#2
Why do you want this done?
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#3
Im a lead guy and I love doin bends and stuff and just shreddin. I know its alot easier doin solos and stuff when there scalloped. I was thinking of doin it only on the 12 -24 frets.
#4
I'm confused. How does this make it easier to solo? I never understood the concept.
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#5
It's not always easier. Have you ever played a guitar with a scalloped neck?

I personally can't stand them... but that's just me.

I'd say... think it through a bit more before deciding. If you REALLY think you need it, then do it, but if not... then don't bother.

Where'd you get this idea?
What guitar are you going to do this to?

I'm confused. How does this make it easier to solo? I never understood concept.

The idea is that you can get more surface area under the string, which makes it easire to bend... apparently. It doesn't help speed.
Plays:
Schecter Hellraiser Solo-6 FR Limited
Parker Mojo Fly
Ibanez SZR 720
Tanglewood Evolution
LaPatrie Etude DEMO
'66 Hagstrom Viking I (customized)
SGR C-7 (defretted)
Agile Intrepid 828

Amp, Pedals:
Laney LV300
BOSS RC-20XL
Last edited by Fryer Mike at Apr 23, 2008,
#6
it'll make it more difficult if anything. Do you really think that Yngwie chose to scallop his frets because it made playing easier? You have to have a much lighter touch to get the notes to be in tune. press the string too hard and you'll go sharp. It means you have to improve your touch and accuracy.

The only reason for scalloping is to make vibrato and bends easier.
Rhythm in Jump. Dancing Close to You.

Quote by element4433
Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#8
Not really sure why you'd do it, or how it would affect your playing. As far as I remember it already has XJ frets already on it, so you shouldn't have the feeling that I get when I play a friend's Telecaster.

If you do it, let us know how it turns out.
Quote by darkstar2466


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#9
Quote by Fryer Mike
It's not always easier. Have you ever played a guitar with a scalloped neck?

I personally can't stand them... but that's just me.

I'd say... think it through a bit more before deciding. If you REALLY think you need it, then do it, but if not... then don't bother.

Where'd you get this idea?
What guitar are you going to do this to?


The idea is that you can get more surface area under the string, which makes it easire to bend... apparently. It doesn't help speed.



untrue. It doesn't help directly. yes it makes vibrato and bends easier, and it forces you to play with a lighter touch. when you play with a lighter touch you expend less energy and time when you play so you are able to improve your speed with more ease
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#10
Quote by Lefty7Stringer
untrue. It doesn't help directly. yes it makes vibrato and bends easier, and it forces you to play with a lighter touch. when you play with a lighter touch you expend less energy and time when you play so you are able to improve your speed with more ease

it requires a finesse that most players don't have. It'd take a while to get to the point where it'd make a difference to your technique.
Rhythm in Jump. Dancing Close to You.

Quote by element4433
Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#11
Quote by Lemoninfluence
it requires a finesse that most players don't have. It'd take a while to get to the point where it'd make a difference to your technique.


it just takes a few days of solid playing on one to get the feel and touch. I would know
Quote by pwninator123
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Quote by death.prog
Ugh...

When I brought up this page, so much fail dumped out of my computer screen and all over my hands, severely damaging my ability as a musician.
#12
Quote by Lefty7Stringer
it just takes a few days of solid playing on one to get the feel and touch. I would know

it wouldn't take too long to get used to playing on a scalloped guitar. but for it to fundamentally impact your overall technique will take a bit longer.

You might get used to the light touch required quite quickly but if you went back to a 'normal' guitar I don't think your touch would be as light and you'd just go back to how you used to play the guitar. And getting up to speed with a deft touch would be harder for the average guitarist.

when most people try to play fast, they lose all finesse and end up flailing their fingers around trying to get them to the next note in time. fair enough if you put the time in to constantly improve your technique then you won't exactly be at a disadvantage but it doesn't mean you'll improve quicker than on a normal guitar. It's just that instead of just wanting to get an accurate touch you'll need to get an accurate touch but if you're motivated to improve that shouldn't be a problem.
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Quote by element4433
Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#13
^LOL, Argument.
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#14
Quote by BMXfreak000
^LOL, Argument.

fantastic contribution to both the 'argument' and the thread.

well done at life.
Rhythm in Jump. Dancing Close to You.

Quote by element4433
Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#15
I don't understand why everyone seems to be kinda freaking out about it. It's not like he's doing the entire neck.

Most people that scallop their necks generally only do the 12-24th fret anyway. I know it takes a lighter touch, and it's a very different feeling to me (yes, I had some fun trying out Malmsteen's sig.), but how else are you going to get used to it if you don't try it. Sure, you can try practicing with a light touch, but personally I don't think it's the same.

Just as long as the TS realizes that once it's done though, it's done. No going back unless you decide to get a replacement neck or a replacement guitar. Or you can always get it done on a lesser expensive guitar until you know for sure that you like it and decide to put it on your custom.

I've actually considered doing the same thing to my tele-copy. It's one of those mods on my future "to-do" list.
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#16
Quote by Hakael
I don't understand why everyone seems to be kinda freaking out about it. It's not like he's doing the entire neck.

Most people that scallop their necks generally only do the 12-24th fret anyway. I know it takes a lighter touch, and it's a very different feeling to me (yes, I had some fun trying out Malmsteen's sig.), but how else are you going to get used to it if you don't try it. Sure, you can try practicing with a light touch, but personally I don't think it's the same.

Just as long as the TS realizes that once it's done though, it's done. No going back unless you decide to get a replacement neck or a replacement guitar. Or you can always get it done on a lesser expensive guitar until you know for sure that you like it and decide to put it on your custom.

I've actually considered doing the same thing to my tele-copy. It's one of those mods on my future "to-do" list.

well when I posted he hadn't told us that he'd tried it and I wanted to let him know all the facts. The way he worded his post made me think that he thought it was a shortcut to speed up his playing.
Rhythm in Jump. Dancing Close to You.

Quote by element4433
Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#17
Quote by Lemoninfluence
well when I posted he hadn't told us that he'd tried it and I wanted to let him know all the facts. The way he worded his post made me think that he thought it was a shortcut to speed up his playing.


Understandable. That's why I put that little "warning" about not being able to go back once you've done it.

You do it, even just on those frets, find out you hate it, and you're kinda screwed really. That's why I'm planning on doing it on my tele-copy. Wouldn't dream of doing it to my Hellraiser or Blackjack unless I knew that's the way I would play from then on.
~We Rock Out With Our Cocks Out!: UG Naked Club.~
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#18
Trying it on a Tele or Strat seems a lot more understandable as from my own personal experience their Medium frets don't give you a lot of space between the top of the fret and the fingerboard.

If he's looking at doing it to his LTD it already has XJ frets, and whether scalloping would give you the same effect as on a guitar with meduim frets is questionable.

I agree with the warning about trying it, it's irreversable and wouldn't recommend it if he's not certain about that's what he wants.
Quote by darkstar2466


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#19
First of all: don't believe for a second it'll make you play better or faster, but it's still something I'm surprised more players don't use. All down to player preference, really. The only well-known players I know of who bother with neck scalloping are Ritchie B and that pretentious Sweidsh tit, Mr Malmsteen.

Anyway here's my advice - find yourself a secondhand cheapo strat copy (rosewood fingerboard), remove the neck and use a round file to scallop frets 12-22. Takes some time and patience but overall, not at all challenging to do. Once you've got the scallops filed to a suitable depth you simply clean up and smooth the edges with sandpaper/000 steel wool. Job done, you're now the proud owner of a scalloped-fretboard guitar.

Using a crappy fleamarket guitar as a guinea-pig is the best way to try major mods; you can spend as long as you like playing it afterwards to find out whether it's worth doing on your main axe. Everyone has their own opinion and though both Lemoninfluence and Hakael have made good points it's always better to find out things for yourself.
Personally, I'm pretty indifferent - out of 11 or 12 guitars I think I have one fully scalloped, one with just frets twelve and upwards, and also one with only the top three. I haven't bothered on my main gigging guitar, simply because I'm quite happy with the way it plays anyway and it has very thin vintage frets. Can't say it really has that huge an effect on playability, so don't go doing it just for the novelty now, will ya?
#20
Exactly. That is what im doing. I dont know if I would ever do it to my main guitar. Im thinking about putting it on my modded guitar because To me its another way of playing, style, whatever. What im Basically saying is Im thinking of doing it and its just for fun, not to make me better or all that other mumbo jumbo crap.
#21
i think i played a steve vai sig (can't remember which one, but it was white :p) where the last few 20-24 frets were scalloped. it felt just like super bigass jumbo frets, and im not gonna lie, its a lot more comfortable in those hard to reach areas.

I wouldnt scallop the whole neck, and if you did it just on the last few, totally go for it.
get it professionally done though if your gonna do it on one of your own quality guitars, not a flea market one.
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