#1
ok, so i decided to take my very old squier and mod it up, and the first step was a paintjob. Being unexperienced at this stuff, I took advice from my dad who used to be a carpenter but never a guitar player. After sanding, I applied 3 coats of white primer, then white lacquer, then clear lacquer. I'm getting the feeling that finishing a guitar is much more of a process than this. Do I need to do more to get the glossy finish that you see on most guitars, including strats? Thanks to anybody that can help me.
#3
well all im really doing is all new electronics, so i guess it's not THAT much different. I can't see how the order would matter.
#5
only one, should i be really stacking them to give it a thick look? I just looked into it and found that a lot of finishes are topped with acrylic, so does anybody know about that?
#6
Quote by luuuuuuukee
ok, so i decided to take my very old squier and mod it up, and the first step was a paintjob. Being unexperienced at this stuff, I took advice from my dad who used to be a carpenter but never a guitar player. After sanding, I applied 3 coats of white primer, then white lacquer, then clear lacquer. I'm getting the feeling that finishing a guitar is much more of a process than this. Do I need to do more to get the glossy finish that you see on most guitars, including strats? Thanks to anybody that can help me.
Quote by luuuuuuukee
only one, should i be really stacking them to give it a thick look? I just looked into it and found that a lot of finishes are topped with acrylic, so does anybody know about that?

Kudos for calling it very old Squier instead of sh!tty or FL!CKED up Squier! If you check out the ReRanch 101 Tutorial, which applies to Nitro finishes, it talks about the Rule of 3s. This also applies to Acrylic lacquers, at least from what I've read from more experienced modders. I've used this on my very 1st documented mod and it works extremely well. [shameless plug]See my sig[/shameless plug]

Check out http://home.flash.net/~guitars/ReRanch101.html

For the first wet coat (after wiping with the tack cloth) make three passes and stop. The surface will probably not appear very shiny as it dries to touch. (If it does the coats may be too heavy). Now let this first coat dry at least three hours. Tack cloth the finish and make three more passes. As you proceed, wetter passes become safer to make so you may want to slow down the guns movement as you spray. These passes will appear wetter as the finish gets deeper. Let this coat dry at least three hours. For the last coat of the day, tack cloth, spray three passes and let dry until morning.

Before spraying the next coat, wet sand the finish to remove any runs or particles that may have settled onto the finish. Start lightly with #400, #600 and end with #800. Let the surface dry and repeat yesterdays schedule. I.e., three passes, let dry three hours then repeat and then repeat. Let to the finish dry overnight and sand as you did the first day.

The third days spraying is a "re-repeat". Summing up this spray technique, spray three passes to make a coat, allow each coat to dry at least three hours and spray no more than three coats a day for at least three days. Hence, "The Rule of Threes".


Tip: When wetsanding, make sure to wet your fine grit sandpaper overnight. This ensures that the paper backing is soft and doesn't gouge the relatively soft finish.

After the final wetsanding and removal of any orange peel, you're supposed to let the acrylic cure for 3-6 weeks. It's up to you. I've disregarded this piece but YMMV.

To give it that factory, glassy and glossy finish, you'll need to buff/polish it after 3-6 weeks. I use 3M's Finesse It II products, incredible shininess, makes the surface look wet!

Glad you're having a blast with your dad. Although we obviously know more than them, they usually know some obscure stuff we don't know, so listen. It makes them feel useful.

Good Luck!

#7
ippon, thanks alot. i was hoping to make this a week thing starting last sunday and ending today (im leaving for a cruise soon), but i see this is a pretty long process. I'll just start over when I get back. can I use a layer of clear lacquer as base, or do I need to sand the whole thing down to bare wood again and THEN start from the beginning?