#1
I've got a question for you theory pros lol. I've noticed that groups like Boston often feature harmonized guitar solos in their songs. What is the theory behind these solos? I mean, when you play a harmonized solo, how do you know how far or how close the notes of the solos need to be together to make the harmony? Are there intervals for harmonies? Thanks
#2
Thirds are common, though the notes are often adjusted to be the major or minor third depending on which fits in the key. This is known as diatonic 3rd harmony since you're staying diatonic, within, the scale.

Straight fifths, with no adjustment, are common as well. This is called parallel fifths.

Parallel 4ths are common.

Diatonic 6ths are used a bit, too.

Edit: Fixed.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Apr 24, 2008,
#3
hmm ok that helps some. Thanks. When you say a diatonic 6th, does that mean, 6 notes away from a set note? I.E. the 6th of d major would be c#?
#4
actually i believe a 6th is 11 semitones
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#5
Quote by rockadoodle
hmm ok that helps some. Thanks. When you say a diatonic 6th, does that mean, 6 notes away from a set note? I.E. the 6th of d major would be c#?


6th of D major is B I believe, unless I am understanding this out of context
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#6
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Thirds are common, though the notes are often adjusted to be the major or minor third depending on which fits in the key. This is known as diatonic 6th harmony since you're staying diatonic, within, the scale.

Straight fifths, with no adjustment, are common as well. This is called parallel fifths.

Parallel 4ths are common.

Diatonic 6ths are used a bit, too.



Isn't that diatonic 3rds?
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Jackson RR3
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Quote by madbasslover
What's the big deal with Gibsons, anyway?
I've heard loads of Gibsons being played before
and they don't sound any more special than
any other guitar.

^UG's King Of Fail.
#7
for refference:

• When two notes are 0 half steps apart (you are playing the same note twice) this “interval” is called a Unison.
• When two notes are a half step (one fret) apart, the interval is called a Minor 2nd
• When two notes are 2 half steps (one whole step or 2 frets) the interval is called a Major 2nd
• When two notes are 3 half steps (one and a half whole steps or 3 frets) the interval is called a Minor 3rd
• When two notes are 4 half steps (two whole steps or 4 frets ) the interval is called a Major 3rd
• When two notes are 5 half steps (two and a half whole steps or 5 frets ) the interval is called a Perfect 4th
• When two notes are 6 half steps (3 whole steps or 6 frets ) the interval is called a Tritone
• When two notes are 7 half steps (3 and a half whole steps or 7 frets ) the interval is called a Perfect 5th
• When two notes are 8 half steps (four whole steps or 8 frets ) the interval is called a Minor 6th
• When two notes are 9 half steps (4 and a half whole steps or 9 frets ) the interval is called a Major 6th
• When two notes are 10 half steps (5 whole steps or 10 frets ) the interval is called a Minor 7th
• When two notes are 11 half steps (5 and a half whole steps or 5 frets ) the interval is called a Major 7th
• When two notes are 12 half steps (6 whole steps or 12 frets ) the interval is called an Octave.
#8
hmm ok that helps some. Thanks. When you say a diatonic 6th, does that mean, 6 notes away from a set note? I.E. the 6th of d major would be c#?
No, a simple example in C is probably the best explanation

C major is C D E F G A B C
Say your melody is:
C E G A F D C

To harmonise a diatonic sixth with each note, count up six notes in the key and play that.
Six notes from C is A, so you harmonise C with A. This interval is 4.5 tones, and is called a Major sixth.
For the next note, E, you find that the diatonic sixth is C. The interval from E to C is 4 tones, and is called a minor sixth.

Notice that the interval changed from Major to minor, in order to remain diatonic. If you harmonised a Major sixth with E, you would have C#, which is not in the key.

Repeating for all the notes you get
Original Melody:
C E G A F D C
Harmonised Melody:
A C E F D B A
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