#1
im just wondering how can i get a tone similar to his. Im talking about the solo tone. Its weird because it sounds so clean. His soloing is very clean in precice in that album but after that he gets a lot sloppier.
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2)make obvious punk puns, possibly related to food
3)make fun of Rancid and NOFX again
4)??????
5)PROFIT (and an army of internet fanboys)
#2
idk but i would like to know that setting and the setup for fade to blacks intro it sounds like roaring thunder and since your asking about tone i guess this question could be answered

also just a shot in the dark but i hear he uses his tube screamer bit i dont know the setting so im not entirley sure
#4
Kirk Hammett didn't write the solos for Kill 'em All. Nor did he record them. He joined Metallica a month before the albums release. Just thought I'd share some Metallica history with you.
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#5
Quote by Dimebag Dave
Kirk Hammett didn't write the solos for Kill 'em All. Nor did he record them. He joined Metallica a month before the albums release. Just thought I'd share some Metallica history with you.


Kirk Hammet did record them. -_-

Mustaine wrote them.
#6
Quote by Dimebag Dave
Kirk Hammett didn't write the solos for Kill 'em All. Nor did he record them. He joined Metallica a month before the albums release. Just thought I'd share some Metallica history with you.


not quite right.

The Mustaine factor

Metallica's original lineup featured James Hetfield (guitar/vocals), Lars Ulrich (drums), Ron McGovney (bass) and Dave Mustaine (lead guitar/vocals). Due to tensions between McGovney and Mustaine, McGovney left the band. Castro Valley-born bassist Cliff Burton was recruited as a replacement.

Mustaine and Hetfield had personality conflicts, with Mustaine later blaming the rivalry on the fact that "there was too much personality" in the band.[3] These tensions led to a fist-fight that broke out between Mustaine and Hetfield,[4] after Mustaine accused Hetfield of kicking his dog.[5]

Despite their differences, Mustaine's contribution to the early years of Metallica were not completely neglected; he received co-writing credits on four of the songs in Kill 'Em All. One song, "The Four Horsemen" was originally written by Mustaine and titled "The Mechanix". It was performed at many early Metallica shows. Following Mustaine's exit, replacement lead guitarist Kirk Hammett added a mid-paced, melodic middle section. Hetfield also wrote new lyrics and the band renamed it The Four Horsemen. Mustaine kept the faster paced original version of the song, renamed it simply "Mechanix", and included it on the first Megadeth album, Killing Is My Business... And Business Is Good!. Mustaine's other writing credits on Kill 'Em All are for the songs "Jump in the Fire", "Phantom Lord" and "Metal Militia".

Mustaine was fired in early 1983, just prior to the recording of Kill 'Em All. Hetfield and Ulrich stated that they fired Dave because of his alcohol problem. Mustaine initially denied this, but in Metallica's 2004 movie Some Kind of Monster, Mustaine stated that he wished Metallica had told him to go to AA. After Mustaine's departure, Metallica recruited Kirk Hammett, Exodus guitarist and one-time student of guitar legend Joe Satriani. The band started recording Kill 'Em All with Hammett barely a month after his joining. Mustaine went on to form the band Megadeth, who also achieved multi-million selling success.

[edit] Album title
#7
Quote by Tvr
not quite right.

The Mustaine factor

Metallica's original lineup featured James Hetfield (guitar/vocals), Lars Ulrich (drums), Ron McGovney (bass) and Dave Mustaine (lead guitar/vocals). Due to tensions between McGovney and Mustaine, McGovney left the band. Castro Valley-born bassist Cliff Burton was recruited as a replacement.

Mustaine and Hetfield had personality conflicts, with Mustaine later blaming the rivalry on the fact that "there was too much personality" in the band.[3] These tensions led to a fist-fight that broke out between Mustaine and Hetfield,[4] after Mustaine accused Hetfield of kicking his dog.[5]

Despite their differences, Mustaine's contribution to the early years of Metallica were not completely neglected; he received co-writing credits on four of the songs in Kill 'Em All. One song, "The Four Horsemen" was originally written by Mustaine and titled "The Mechanix". It was performed at many early Metallica shows. Following Mustaine's exit, replacement lead guitarist Kirk Hammett added a mid-paced, melodic middle section. Hetfield also wrote new lyrics and the band renamed it The Four Horsemen. Mustaine kept the faster paced original version of the song, renamed it simply "Mechanix", and included it on the first Megadeth album, Killing Is My Business... And Business Is Good!. Mustaine's other writing credits on Kill 'Em All are for the songs "Jump in the Fire", "Phantom Lord" and "Metal Militia".

Mustaine was fired in early 1983, just prior to the recording of Kill 'Em All. Hetfield and Ulrich stated that they fired Dave because of his alcohol problem. Mustaine initially denied this, but in Metallica's 2004 movie Some Kind of Monster, Mustaine stated that he wished Metallica had told him to go to AA. After Mustaine's departure, Metallica recruited Kirk Hammett, Exodus guitarist and one-time student of guitar legend Joe Satriani. The band started recording Kill 'Em All with Hammett barely a month after his joining. Mustaine went on to form the band Megadeth, who also achieved multi-million selling success.

[edit] Album title



If you just depend on wiki then that is just sad, seriously.
#8
when did i say that he wrote the solos??? i never said that at all. He used mustaines solos as a guideline (he copied them but he threw some of his own stuff in there) you can hear there are differences if you go on youtube and compare the demos to Killemall. He recorded them and he played them very cleanly and precisely which he didnt really do for the rest of his career. Im just wondering what was going on when he recorded them that made them sound so damn good. you can tell hes using some sort of effect when he solos because it sounds very different than when hes riffing.
The Mitch Clem formula
1)make jokes about rancid and NOFX (as if they dont already make fun of themselves)
2)make obvious punk puns, possibly related to food
3)make fun of Rancid and NOFX again
4)??????
5)PROFIT (and an army of internet fanboys)
#9
JCM800

Treble: 7
Gain: 6
Bass: 3
Mids: 6

TS-9

I think it was something like eveerything put at 2 o'clock.

That's just overall tone for KeA and some of RtL
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#10
Quote by The Minorthreat
If you just depend on wiki then that is just sad, seriously.


that really isn't much of an argument.
#11
I think the answer were looking for is WAH, WAH, and even more WAH.
Last edited by metalman89 at Apr 25, 2008,
#12
Quote by The Minorthreat
If you just depend on wiki then that is just sad, seriously.


Most of that was pretty much a paraphrase of a recent Kirk Hammett interview so don't just assume people get all of their facts from wikipedia.


TS, to answer your question. Kill 'Em All was done with boosted Marshall superleads so if you have a Marshally amplifier and an overdrive, you pretty much have the tone.

A ProCo Rat would help too.
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#13
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Most of that was pretty much a paraphrase of a recent Kirk Hammett interview so don't just assume people get all of their facts from wikipedia.


TS, to answer your question. Kill 'Em All was done with boosted Marshall superleads so if you have a Marshally amplifier and an overdrive, you pretty much have the tone.

A ProCo Rat would help too.



Mustaine and Hetfield had personality conflicts, with Mustaine later blaming the rivalry on the fact that "there was too much personality" in the band.[3] These tensions led to a fist-fight that broke out between Mustaine and Hetfield,[4] after Mustaine accused Hetfield of kicking his dog.[5]


Yeah, I'm sure Kirk said that in the interview and I'm %100 sure that kirk was there when Metallica started too.


I really want to see the interview that shows that he said most of that in the comment the guy gave cause most of it was about what happened before Kirk came into Metallica.


The only people that know what happen with the starting of Metallica is James,Lars,Dave, and the other bassist.BTW, that was all copied and pasted from wiki.
Last edited by The Minorthreat at Apr 24, 2008,
#14
Quote by metalman89
I think thr answer were looking for is WAH, WAH, and even more WAH.

Hammet didnt use the wah as much in the early days.

^
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#16
Hammett and Hetfield used Marshall (JMP I believe) each, Hetfield used a ProCo to boost and add gain while Hammett used a Boss Super Distortion. For guitars, I believe they just used Hetfield's Flying V and Hammett's Flying V, with EMG if I remember. Hammett also used a wah. Not other guitars or equipment (they were basically broke when recording!).

btw, this is all in the February 08 issue of Guitar World, for those that want to hear about the whole recording process...it's actually quite interesting, and i'm no metallica fanboy (even though they do kick major ass).
#17
Quote by metalman89
I think thr answer were looking for is WAH, WAH, and even more WAH.


not funny man... he seldom used wah in his solos... only small gigs where he had his own solo part he used the wah, and he does not abuse it.
#18
Quote by huaj
not funny man... he seldom used wah in his solos... only small gigs where he had his own solo part he used the wah, and he does not abuse it.



Trust me, Kirk abuses wah pedals so much he could have life in prison.
#19
Quote by The Minorthreat
Trust me, Kirk abuses wah pedals so much he could have life in prison.



Back in the day, Kill em All stuff, the wah was almost non-existant, then Puppets rolled around, and then wah hell erupted.
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#20
Quote by by_guitar11
Back in the day, Kill em All stuff, the wah was almost non-existant, then Puppets rolled around, and then wah hell erupted.


Because Dave Mustaine doesn't use wah pedal and doesn't use thing for his sopos (BTW thats why there was no wah abuse).
#21
It is in GuitarWorld Feb and just because someone uses a Wah doesn't mean they are constantly pushing the pedal up and down. Some people use a Wah just for the tone or disto alone and never touch it. i do...so there.

;
#22
Quote by Tvr
not quite right.

The Mustaine factor

Metallica's original lineup featured James Hetfield (guitar/vocals), Lars Ulrich (drums), Ron McGovney (bass) and Dave Mustaine (lead guitar/vocals). Due to tensions between McGovney and Mustaine, McGovney left the band. Castro Valley-born bassist Cliff Burton was recruited as a replacement.

Mustaine and Hetfield had personality conflicts, with Mustaine later blaming the rivalry on the fact that "there was too much personality" in the band.[3] These tensions led to a fist-fight that broke out between Mustaine and Hetfield,[4] after Mustaine accused Hetfield of kicking his dog.[5]

Despite their differences, Mustaine's contribution to the early years of Metallica were not completely neglected; he received co-writing credits on four of the songs in Kill 'Em All. One song, "The Four Horsemen" was originally written by Mustaine and titled "The Mechanix". It was performed at many early Metallica shows. Following Mustaine's exit, replacement lead guitarist Kirk Hammett added a mid-paced, melodic middle section. Hetfield also wrote new lyrics and the band renamed it The Four Horsemen. Mustaine kept the faster paced original version of the song, renamed it simply "Mechanix", and included it on the first Megadeth album, Killing Is My Business... And Business Is Good!. Mustaine's other writing credits on Kill 'Em All are for the songs "Jump in the Fire", "Phantom Lord" and "Metal Militia".

Mustaine was fired in early 1983, just prior to the recording of Kill 'Em All. Hetfield and Ulrich stated that they fired Dave because of his alcohol problem. Mustaine initially denied this, but in Metallica's 2004 movie Some Kind of Monster, Mustaine stated that he wished Metallica had told him to go to AA. After Mustaine's departure, Metallica recruited Kirk Hammett, Exodus guitarist and one-time student of guitar legend Joe Satriani. The band started recording Kill 'Em All with Hammett barely a month after his joining. Mustaine went on to form the band Megadeth, who also achieved multi-million selling success.

[edit] Album title


you could've just posted the bolded bit

edit: wasn't there a another lead guitarist before mustaine?
Last edited by myearshurt at Apr 25, 2008,
#23
If you guys watched the Behind the music featuring Metallica, thier old manager (Or somone else. I forgot) said Mustaine never recorded an album with Metallica.

Its somewhere around youtube.
This is my Signature.
#24
LOL guys ts wants 2 know how to get a the kea tone. now its all becoming a big arugment

and yes there was a black guy who was tthe lead guitarist before dave, forgot his name!!

and for kirsk tone

he used a stock flying v back in the day (possibly PAF humbucker) but later on replaced them with emg's.

they used marshall' but im not sure what model...
#26
Kirk used James' Marshall Plexi (modded by Jose Arredondo with an extra gain stage), then ran a Tubescreamer in front of it. He used his black Gibson V, and his red Fernandes V.

James used an Epiphone Flying V with a Seymour Duncan Invader in the bridge, and a ProCo Rat (I think).

Nice, choice, BTW. Kill 'Em All is my favorite Metallica album, and the greatest thrash album of all time.
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#27
Quote by huaj
there was a black guy who was tthe lead guitarist before dave, forgot his name!!


That was Ron McGovney
#28
Quote by The Minorthreat
If you just depend on wiki then that is just sad, seriously.

If you just state stuff and don't back it up then that's just sad,seriously.
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#30
Quote by Horlicks
Didn't he use a Mesa Mark IIC+?


not in the EARLY EARLY days they started using mesas around master of puppets i believe... atleast it sounds like a mesa

it was a mark III btw
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#31
Lot of mids, basically. Less gain than you'd think, as early thrash relied on Marshalls cranked hard, rather than the mega-gain machines we have today.

Really, it's more about playing style. He very rarely goes below the twelfth fret on KEA, and most likely uses the neck pickup. This gives that smooth, clear tone most easily. Most of the notes in the solos are slightly palm muted, too.

You won't duplicate it totally without buying a vintage JCM800, lol, but give it a shot by backing off on the gain, increasing treble and mids. Carefull you don't damn yourself to forever sound like early Kirk Hammett, though, like me
Last edited by Vermintide at Apr 25, 2008,
#32
Quote by ChrisBelfast
That was Ron McGovney


He was the bassist before cliff, and he wasn't black

Hammet is phillipino so he's quite dark, maybie you saw him and didn't recognise him

Anyway on subject, hammet used Jaymz's modded marshall, and no wah atall and basiccally the same settings. Probly less bass and more mid.
#33
Quote by Simonwalker
If you just state stuff and don't back it up then that's just sad,seriously.


I did, I guess you just don't know how to read?


pretty sad don't you think.
#34
Don't triple post.

The lead guitar before Mustaine was Llyod Grant and they did like one demo with him.

I think it was the first Hit the Lights demo.
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#35
The Minorthreat,

You are officially THE biggest douche bag on the UG forums.

As far as what Kirk recorded with, "We used the only guitars we had, which were James' white Flying V and my black Gibson Flying V... I just used a wah pedal and a Boss Super Distortion." He doesn't mention anything about the amps that were used but I know that back in the day they played through Marshalls (not exactly sure of the model though)
#36
Quote by i_am_metalhead
The Minorthreat,

You are officially THE biggest douche bag on the UG forums.

As far as what Kirk recorded with, "We used the only guitars we had, which were James' white Flying V and my black Gibson Flying V... I just used a wah pedal and a Boss Super Distortion." He doesn't mention anything about the amps that were used but I know that back in the day they played through Marshalls (not exactly sure of the model though)


Thank you.


I can just smell the senior maturity.
#37
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
Don't triple post.

The lead guitar before Mustaine was Llyod Grant and they did like one demo with him.

I think it was the first Hit the Lights demo.

I don't think he was before Mustaine. Mustaine left once before, which was when they hired Lloyd but then Mustaine came back shortly after, before getting kicked out again just before they went into the studio to record KEA.
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#38
Quote by i_am_metalhead
The Minorthreat,

You are officially THE biggest douche bag on the UG forums.


after reading minorthreat's post I have to agree
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#39
Quote by The Minorthreat
I did, I guess you just don't know how to read?


pretty sad don't you think.

where exactly did you back up your claim that the album was recorded with Mustaine?

every source I've ever seen has stated that Mustaine wrote the solos and Hammett played them almost note for note on the record.
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