#1
After having songwriters block for the past couple of months, I think I've finally realized what's been inhibiting me creatively, and that is that I play the same rhythms and strumming patterns all the time. There's one in particular that I always pull out when someone lays down a chord progression in jam sessions, and it's really frustrating now knowing that I'm really just playing the same rhythm over and over again.

Lately I've been really into the Mars Volta, and I love how the guitar parts are so unique rhythmically, but fit together so well with the drums. Are there any strumming exercises or books on rhythm guitar that could break me out of this rut? Or if anyone else has had this predicament, is this even the right way to go about correcting it?

Thanks in advance.
#2
Just listen to a lot of different styles of music, that should help you out.
Paul Gilbert
Steve Vai
Joe Satriani
John Petrucci
#3
Before you just start strumming away, think about what you want to do. Think of a rhythm that works with the music, then do that.
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Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#4
Quote by rhcpfan27
Just listen to a lot of different styles of music, that should help you out.


+1

Quote by Ænimus Prime
Before you just start strumming away, think about what you want to do. Think of a rhythm that works with the music, then do that.


+1


good advice. Id look into both ^
#5
I listen to everything from psytrance to free jazz to mathcore, so I don't think different styles of music is an issue, everything influences me. But I can see what you mean, I've always just looked at chord progressions and riffs in songs, but never the rhythms. I'll give that a try right now, thanks.
#6
Get a percussion book, I can't remember the one casualty use to say he used with his students, but that looked pretty good. I recommend everyone wanting to work on rhythm and developing new rhythms look at Podemski's snare book though. Tap the rhythms out of that, understand how they work, apply to melody or chords.
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#7
The problem may be that you're not putting anymore actual thought into your writing/improvisation and are just letting your hands take the generic route.

Try playing but only in a way that deviates from your usual style. Try going really slow, if it helps at first.
#8
write combos of d&u on a sheet of paper, no more than three in a row. don't touch the guitar until 15 random combos go down, then play the rhythm without any notes( d=downstroke, u= upstroke) then add chords. this should help break your rut if you keep at it a few days finding all sorts of variation of strumming. do this slow, fast, ragged, rubato... whatever, just dont play the same exercise twice.
ex: dudduduu ududududuu ududduddu udduududu
___c ___________a minor ____d________g


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Last edited by foo_diddles at Apr 25, 2008,
#9
You can also get a drum machine or some type of percussion software.
The more style of percussions the better.

Get a recorder..You can get a 8track digital recorder 40gig for $200.
A song takes on a life of it's own somtimes. Sometimes it just
starts off with a simple excerize or just from messing around.

Sometimes , I might not be in the mood to play certain type of music
or it dosn't sound right to me...when the muse comes..she comes.
i get some meldoy , riffs running in my head, but not really in the mood
to play. But i can quickly laid down a track of it.

Then a week later, the stuff that i though wasn't good. just takes
on a life of it's own. It's nice to have it recorded.
Last edited by Ordinary at Apr 25, 2008,