#1
Alright, well, in regards to my previous post about fret buzzing, turns out top-wrapping the strings not only fixed pretty much all the buzzing, but gave the strings a much slinkier feel to them, which I really like.

However, now I'm trying to increase sustain. It's an Epi LP Custom with the stock pickups (I don't have money for new pickups at the moment, so that's not an option).

I know you're supposed to play it acoustically first to see if there's something else hindering sustain. From what I can tell, the sustain acoustically is fine (can't necessarily hear it forever, but if I pluck the high e string open as well as fretted and let it run its course, if I mute it I can feel slight vibrations before it goes still).

So now I'm wondering what the best plan of action is short of (a) taping quarters to my headstock, and (b) buying new pickups. I'm playing through a Crate GTD-15 (it's a solid-state 15w practice amp, I don't need a gig amp right now :P), so I tried turning the volume up on that to about 3/4ths of the way, and the volume on my guitar down, which helps a bit, but I'm not really sure if that's the proper way to do it. I also messed around with pickup height, as they were far too low (almost a quarter of an inch, I think), so I brought them up to about an 8th of an inch, and I'll try messing around with them some more tomorrow when my roommate's not sleeping, at least for the sake of tone if not sustain.

I don't really have much of a gauge for what the sustain should be. Actually, on my bass strings it's pretty darn good, can go for a while. On the treble side it's not as good, the high e string sort of peters out after maybe 10 seconds at best, and that's the one I'd really like to have ring.

Any and all suggestions appreciated. Thanks guys.
#3
I have a set of .10's on my Gibson LP and I get great sustain.

Never tried top-wrapping the strings though. Might try it one time to give it a feel.
I hate my username, it all happened in a rush


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#5
Uhhh, top-wrapping cannot be done on a through-bodied guitar.
I hate my username, it all happened in a rush


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#8
Stop top-wrapping. It decreases string tension, and thus sustain. Try heavier strings as well.
#9
this is top wrapping
Gear
Gibson Les Paul std faded, Godin LG
Marshall jcm900
Keeley ds1, maxon od808, boston tu500, RMC Wizard
#10
1 - sustain is always less on the thinner strings because they have less mass, you can't fight physics. The string will continue to vibrate but the sound won't be audible.

2 - don't worry about amplified sustain with a 15 watt practice amp, just be thankful that it makes a bearable noise. The noise petering out like that could well be down to the crappiness of the amp.

In short, it doesn't sound like there's a problem at all, other than the fact that you're looking for your amp to do something its simply not capable of.
Actually called Mark!

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#11
Quote by espm200
what do u mean by through bodied?

Where the strings go THROUGH the body.

Refer to above picture.
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#12
ah. i was confused there for a bit when he said through body. im not an expert but i dont think a guitar with a floyd rose bridge is the same thing as a string through bodied guitar.
#13
Quote by steven seagull
1 - sustain is always less on the thinner strings because they have less mass, you can't fight physics. The string will continue to vibrate but the sound won't be audible.

2 - don't worry about amplified sustain with a 15 watt practice amp, just be thankful that it makes a bearable noise. The noise petering out like that could well be down to the crappiness of the amp.

In short, it doesn't sound like there's a problem at all, other than the fact that you're looking for your amp to do something its simply not capable of.


Ah, thank you for putting that to rest for me. I guess I was a little too influenced by videos of guys with seemingly endless sustain. I'm pretty happy with the amp, although I guess I'll mess around today and see what else I can do.

By the way, I highly recommend any LP owners try top-wrapping, at least for the purposes of experimentation. I like it so much better, since I can have my action as low as I want it and still be able to bend.

Thanks for everyone's responses.
#14
Quote by samling
Ah, thank you for putting that to rest for me. I guess I was a little too influenced by videos of guys with seemingly endless sustain. I'm pretty happy with the amp, although I guess I'll mess around today and see what else I can do.

By the way, I highly recommend any LP owners try top-wrapping, at least for the purposes of experimentation. I like it so much better, since I can have my action as low as I want it and still be able to bend.

Thanks for everyone's responses.

Seriously, you'll be so much happier with a decent one - even something like a Vox Valvetronix would be a massive improvement. However if you really want to hear your guitar at it's best you want to be running it through a cranked tube amp so you can get some controlled feedback...something like a Peavey Classic 30 will sound amazing compared to your current amp.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#16
Quote by steven seagull
Seriously, you'll be so much happier with a decent one - even something like a Vox Valvetronix would be a massive improvement. However if you really want to hear your guitar at it's best you want to be running it through a cranked tube amp so you can get some controlled feedback...something like a Peavey Classic 30 will sound amazing compared to your current amp.

What do you mean, even a Vox Valvetronix?
#17
As the other guys have hinted...

Since you have an OK guitar, you need to spend some money on a good amp.

Please note that I did NOT say "an expensive amp"! If money is an issue, check around for a used tube amp of maybe 20 to 30 watts. (Less is ok/better too!). That should move you into an area where your amp will be working with you rather than against you and you'll know the difference right away.

I bought both of my larger amps used and got em cheap. (Less than $100 each.) and after a pro check-out, I'm set for the next few years. Unfortunately, 60 to 100 watt amps are cheaper than the low power ones. but you can allways drive the larger amps with a distortion pedal if necessary.

If you have some money to spend, you might consider a Gilmore Jr 1/2 watt amp kit. SUPER little amp that is botique quality at about $285. A 1/2 watt tube amp is plenty loud enough for any house or apt and the Gilmore is truly a world class amp. The last suggestion I'll make is the new Blackheart "Killer Ant" but it won't be in stores for a little while. Even though I don't need one I'll probably buy it.... It sounds bitchin and it's sooo cute! Yep... I'm definately gonna get one of those!

Sorry if some of think that my suggestions go against the grain but I just hate to see people spend money at the guitar stores, when theres so much great used equipment out there, that just as good (Or better!) at HUGE savings.

You may not end up with the latest brand but who gives a s***? You'll be rockin with your cash in your pocket!

Mymindsok
Last edited by mymindsok at Apr 25, 2008,
#18
Quote by Pikka Bird
Huh?


I've heard that one way to increase sustain is to add weight to the neck. Correct me if I'm wrong, that's just what I read somewhere in passing, and taping quarters to the headstock was mentioned as a very crude way to accomplish this. I said it more as a joke though. :P

Mymindsok, Steven, thank you both for the great insight into amps. I'm going to look at some used ones either at the local guitar shop or on Craigslist when I get a chance; I'm at college in CA right now, and there aren't many guitar stores around here, but when I'm home in NH for the summer I'll take a look at the places around there too. Good to know I don't have to shell out hundreds of bucks for a quality amp.
#19
Quote by samling
I've heard that one way to increase sustain is to add weight to the neck. Correct me if I'm wrong, that's just what I read somewhere in passing, and taping quarters to the headstock was mentioned as a very crude way to accomplish this. I said it more as a joke though. :P
Weight has nothing to do with sustain. Apply your high school physics- how could it possibly have any effect? What matters with sustain is the rigidity of the fastenings and the connection between them. The reason the myth of weight was started is that generally, the heavier the wood is, the harder and more rigid it will be. If you were to weld a guitar bridge, a nut and a set of tuners to an I-beam, it'll sustain for ages, but not because of the weight.
#20
By-the-way...

I made a mistake in my post....

Blackheart is making a new small amp called the "Killer Ant". Check out the demos on You tube. It's a KILLER little amp and it's selling really cheap. (Like just over $100.00!!) Add in a homebuilt speaker cab with a 12" used/pre-owned guitar speaker and youre set!

By-the-way again.... A couple days ago I was cruising Craigslist and snagged two 12" Mojo Tone 60 watt speakers for $75.00 (For the pair stupid!). Theyre in perfect shape. One went into my Pignose V-60 (and really woke that sucker up!) and the other I have for a spare/trade item.

Like I keep telling guys... The deals are out there and theres no real reason not to try to get the biggest bang for your buck.

Out,

Mymindsok

PS: Pikka is dead right about sustain. In fact, if you screw down your bridge with longer SS screws and add a heavier tone block you get lots better sustain. Thjink about this too... By adding weight to the tuning head, youre actually making it harder for the vibrating strings to set in it motion. That'll KILL tone! Loll!! If you talk to Bill Nash at Nash Guitars (Who builds wonderfull axes!), he'll advise you to use the lightest tuners that you can find. You want the guitar to VIBRATE! Works for Bill, works for Eric, works for me till theyre proven wrong!
Last edited by mymindsok at Apr 25, 2008,
#21
Quote by Pikka Bird
Weight has nothing to do with sustain. Apply your high school physics- how could it possibly have any effect? What matters with sustain is the rigidity of the fastenings and the connection between them. The reason the myth of weight was started is that generally, the heavier the wood is, the harder and more rigid it will be. If you were to weld a guitar bridge, a nut and a set of tuners to an I-beam, it'll sustain for ages, but not because of the weight.


Man, I learn something new every time I check this forum. Glad to have that laid to rest. Like I said, I never had any intent of actually testing that myth out, it was only something I heard in passing.

Mymindsok: I'll check out that amp. Also, sounds like you got a pretty good deal on Craigslist. The more money I save, the better.

Thanks guys, you're really helping a lot.