#1
Yo guys, I've been into a lot of blues and rock lately as well as some funky stuff. I've always been mainly a metal rock player, but after listening to the bluesy rock and roll tunes as well as the fast blues rock stuff, I've been captivated and drawn into it. So what are some good songs to start with, and what are the scales needed to play blues and stuff, apart from the pentatonics. The thing is, I realized that a lot of my improvisation using major and minor scales mainly sounded like fast blues licks so I might have been passively in love with the genre for quite some time.Thanks guys!!
My Gear:
Ibanez SV5470 Prestige
Washburn WG208
Marshall MG15DFX(Practice amp)
Peavey Classic Rocker 30/Vox AC15( Coming soon)
POD X3 Live..xD
Mesa Boogie Lonestar Special(In my dreams...)
#2
12 bar blues, 7 &9 chords, blues scale red house is always good to learn, mixolydian mode isnt bad either
#3
Bultaco Saturno - Paul Gilbert

Good funky song, has some fast bits and has some great feeling in it.

Technical Difficulties - Racer X

Most of it's metal but the solo's very blues based so it should get you familiar with a few licks.
#4
outside woman blues - Cream
rock n roll - led zeppelin
crossroads - cream

these are all pretty good and have a good tempo although the first one is a little slower.
#5
im in the same situation as u. learn the blues scale i guess?
Sincerely,
Shitstirrer
#6
You could give some SRV songs a shot as well like Pride and Joy or Texas Flood
#7
Im assuming listening to robert johnson and buddy guy is still a lil out of your attention zone...

Listening to blues music is gonna be one of the best ways to start out. Blues music is gonna be about feeling or its gonna be about regurgitating old licks. For you i might recommend listening to Led Zeppelin and Cream. Their more blues rock but i think thats what youll need to get started and keep from losing it really quick. If you want a really good song to start learning try Since Iv Been Loving You by LZ.

As for scales, look for the blues scale. Its the same thing as pentatonic but with 2 extra notes. Later on you can add minor and mixolidian flavoring to it. hope this helps
#8
Do you guys have any suggestions of good method books that may come with a CD or DVD that are good for learning blues for a beginner? I am currently working through a rhythm guitar book and hal leonard's guitar method vol1-3. I am looking for a blues and/or rock method book to work through next.
~Nick
#9
Great thread. I'm in the exact same boat. I never really listened to blues until I started playing guitar. I'll have to try some of these suggestions. Thanks for the help!
#10
Learn a couple of bluesscales, like D, E, A and G (the most common) and than download a couple of jam tracks and just jam to those tracks, improvise. Stay in those blues scales and give it a bluesy feel. You learn the most of just improvising, jamming etc.
#11
Just find a no good woman practically forces you into blues :P

Seriously though the more you listen to it the quicker you will pick it up, apart from old stuff John lee hooker et al, newer guys like Joe Bonamassa are good places to start.

As for songs just pick somet from listening you like, most will be 12 bar...

Ive always loved blues, recently joined a blues band and tbh I never really saw the full scope of it and never had so much fun playing guitar.. Singer / guitarist in the band (writes songs too) keeps re-iterating to me its a attitude and a feeling they let me solo and sing a few songs, and prob the biggest advice Ive been given was that "sing it like shes just tore out your heart" works too which is strange

Anyhow nuff rambling just enoy yourselves btw Red House is a good place to start :P
Last edited by johntb at Apr 25, 2008,
#13
Check the Blues and Jazz forum, lot's of helpful advice. All the advice given so far is good advice though, so don't worry.
SRV is a very good start, it's got a very open blues influence, but isn't plain blues, lot's of rock'n'roll influence as well. Clapton is the same, loadsa influences, and lots of styles that are all very approachable with blues in them.
#14
Thanks so much guys!!I'm really rev-ed up and ready to start learning some scales and song. I've been taking everyone's advice and indulging myself in some SRV and LZ goodness as well as some John Mayer on the side...I can't believe I haven't heard these songs before this!!Theres just so much emotion and feeling in blues. Thanks so much guys!
My Gear:
Ibanez SV5470 Prestige
Washburn WG208
Marshall MG15DFX(Practice amp)
Peavey Classic Rocker 30/Vox AC15( Coming soon)
POD X3 Live..xD
Mesa Boogie Lonestar Special(In my dreams...)
#16
If you want some pseudo-blues, try some of Mike McCready's solos with Pearl Jam. I've always found his solos bluesy......ish.
#17
What is you're skill level?

If you are a beginner, try some really easy 12 bar blues songs like Rock and Roll and Sunshine of Your Love(is that 12?) and Johnny B. Goode.

If you got a little more skill, get a slide, tune to open G, and just play. Some good songs in Open G are Stack Shot Billy by the Black Keys, Louisiana Blues by Muddy Waters, and In My Time of Dying(the Zeppelin version, which is in Open A, but can be played in Open G).


EDIT: There is very little theory in blues. There are several accidentals that occur, and if they sound good, they are good.

Good chords to know are Dominant 9th chords and Major add9 chords/Minor 7 #5 chords(in a few Jimi Hendrix and SRV songs). Dominant 9th chords are really good for turnarounds.
Last edited by imgooley at Apr 25, 2008,
#18
Quote by cloud_x_13
As for scales, look for the blues scale. Its the same thing as pentatonic but with 2 extra notes.
One extra note. The 'second' is that same note, the next octave up. Yeah, I made the 'two notes more' mistake at first too, it's quite common to get it wrong it seems.


Also, just because it's called the 'blues' scale doesn't mean it's all that perfect for blues playing, nor is it only for blues. Generally speaking, the blues scales are a little bit too limited on their own for good blues improv.



I think the key to learning how to play blues well, is get your expressive tools down correctly - bends, vibrato, slides, harmonics, and so on. The difference between good blues playing and bad blues playing can sometimes just be knowing when to slide instead of bend, or being able to apply proper vibrato.
Everything else in blues basically just comes from a basic "play what you feel" ideology - you shouldn't throw theory out the window completely, but generally if you think something will sound good, you play it even if it contradicts one of the many 'rules' about guitar playing. BB King and Clapton didn't get to where they are today by sticking to the rules like law.
#19
Quote by bokuho
One extra note. The 'second' is that same note, the next octave up. Yeah, I made the 'two notes more' mistake at first too, it's quite common to get it wrong it seems.


Also, just because it's called the 'blues' scale doesn't mean it's all that perfect for blues playing, nor is it only for blues. Generally speaking, the blues scales are a little bit too limited on their own for good blues improv.



I think the key to learning how to play blues well, is get your expressive tools down correctly - bends, vibrato, slides, harmonics, and so on. The difference between good blues playing and bad blues playing can sometimes just be knowing when to slide instead of bend, or being able to apply proper vibrato.
Everything else in blues basically just comes from a basic "play what you feel" ideology - you shouldn't throw theory out the window completely, but generally if you think something will sound good, you play it even if it contradicts one of the many 'rules' about guitar playing. BB King and Clapton didn't get to where they are today by sticking to the rules like law.

Every single statement made in this post are 100% correct.

Dynamics and slurs are very important in blues. Harmony and rhythm are also integral, more so than melody. The goal of a blues guitarist is to make his guitar "sing".
#20
Quote by bokuho
One extra note. The 'second' is that same note, the next octave up. Yeah, I made the 'two notes more' mistake at first too, it's quite common to get it wrong it seems.


Also, just because it's called the 'blues' scale doesn't mean it's all that perfect for blues playing, nor is it only for blues. Generally speaking, the blues scales are a little bit too limited on their own for good blues improv.



I think the key to learning how to play blues well, is get your expressive tools down correctly - bends, vibrato, slides, harmonics, and so on. The difference between good blues playing and bad blues playing can sometimes just be knowing when to slide instead of bend, or being able to apply proper vibrato.
Everything else in blues basically just comes from a basic "play what you feel" ideology - you shouldn't throw theory out the window completely, but generally if you think something will sound good, you play it even if it contradicts one of the many 'rules' about guitar playing. BB King and Clapton didn't get to where they are today by sticking to the rules like law.


i knew someone would get picky. I know its the same thing but really, im pretty sure guy isnt all that interested in the note nor the theory behind it. (its a augmented fourth or a diminished 5th - both are the same thing...). Simply that there are 2 more fret locations to push down on.

why do people have to be such narcs?
#21
SRV and Jimi Hendrix!

When I started off, I just solo'd to a backing track using a blues scale, and trying to imitate the tempo/sounds which qualified Blues guitarists use.
#22
I would just say learn and practice a lot of different scales and then base chords off of the scales you play most.
#23
Quote by cloud_x_13
i knew someone would get picky. I know its the same thing but really, im pretty sure guy isnt all that interested in the note nor the theory behind it. (its a augmented fourth or a diminished 5th - both are the same thing...). Simply that there are 2 more fret locations to push down on.

why do people have to be such narcs?

What's so difficult about providing the correct information in the first place? Telling peope the wrong thing isn't going to help them much.
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#24
1.learn blues scale
2.f*ck with it for hours on end
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#25
Blues you can use, by john ganapes.

15 bucks
SRV R.I.P.