#1
hey guys sorry if this has been done before

but i wanna know why some people prefer to improves in minor pentatonic rather than minor scale? its just 2 notes lesser than the natural minor right

isit because of ease?


thanks in advance
#2
Flavor mostly.

It'll be the same as saying why not just play the chromatic instead of the diatonic?
it's just 4 more notes.

For me,
By playing less notes. (Those 2 notes that are dropped arnt just any notes.)
It will allow me to make a smoother transition if I which to change keys in the
middle of the song.

I'll keep it in C. Maybe you can see it easier. Look at the circle of 5th.
The 4th(F )and the 7th(B )....these are the notes that are going shift pitch
when changing keys to the left or right of the key of C.

The first key or center key is C.
On the flat side is the key of F......it has a Bb
On the sharp side is the key of G..it has a F#

Cmaj/Amin penatatonic...dosn't have the note F/F# or B/Bb

Example if you're soloing over Amin in the of C.. it would be aerolian.
It can be the Dorain mode in the key of G.
Basically becuase the F/F# is not being played...
I then can insert the F# a couple of measures after the transition as i play other complete scales/mode.

Then I can go into Amin movement. (The dorain becomes the I chord)..if i wish.

it works in the same way if I want to go to the key of F.

FREEDOM..baby.lmao

I can go back and forth in these 3 keys F,C,G relativly easy without shocking
the listener's ears.
#3
haha wow thats quite difficult for me to understand.. but thanks anyway! appreciate it
#4
Quote by disillusia
haha wow thats quite difficult for me to understand.. but thanks anyway! appreciate it


to keep it simple: it sounds different


think of each scale as being a color in your palette. One may be similar, yet a slightly different shade. All colors and shades of those colors are useful to an artist.
#6
that right, pentatonic sounds different, more straight and rocky to me, and minor has more emotion (i think). another reason someone might use is, seeing as it has less notes, that is easier to stay in tune, so its good for people just starting to improvise.
#7
How difficult can it be ??

In key of C

2,3, 6..these are the minors

when shifting the 6 to the 2...to the key of G...it would be A dorian ommiting the 2 notes
when shifting the 6 to the 3.. to the the key of F..it would be A phygian ommiting the 2 notes.

it's the same idea as plying X5 power chord...
the 5 chord dosn't have a 3rd or a b3rd. It dosn't completly defines a chord.
It's nither minor nor major.

The 2 notes that are dropped to obtain the pentatonic..dosn't define
a complete mode or scale.
Last edited by Ordinary at Apr 25, 2008,
#8
What I found works best for me, is to play minor pent but drop in some notes from the minor and the blues scale. Because the minor pent gives that rock sound, while the minor scale if great for fast shred runs, and the blues scale works great for repetitive hammer ons/pull offs... Just my 2 cents.
#10
Quote by zeppelinfreak51
I thought it was to remove the tritone between the 2nd and 6th?


Yeah. Those are avoid notes, as they are easier to create dissonances with than the other scale degrees. If you really want you can play what you think is minor, but whilst excluding the second and sixth, you get the minor pentatonic. Its not that people don't think the minor scale is good, they just happen not to use the second and sixth, which leads to the minor pentatonic.
#11
especially with improvising minor pentatonic is used because it's the first thing that will come to mind (for me anyways), sometimes it works other times it won't. people will jump to the pentatonic minor instead of the minor scale because they haven't quite figured out what mode would work well, and pentatonic minor is a improv staple.

i personally use the minor pentatonic for massive bends, and then do a fast picking run in the minor scale.
Quote by coolstoryangus
Pffffffft schematics


Although i guess the OP will have to get used to reading them if he's going to buy a bugera..
Quote by gregs1020


along with fire escape routes...

#12
Quote by aradine
especially with improvising minor pentatonic is used because it's the first thing that will come to mind (for me anyways), sometimes it works other times it won't. people will jump to the pentatonic minor instead of the minor scale because they haven't quite figured out what mode would work well, and pentatonic minor is a improv staple.

i personally use the minor pentatonic for massive bends, and then do a fast picking run in the minor scale.


So its pretty much what you can use without having to think too much. I personally have never bothered to familiarize myself with it, the sounds that come from it have just been done too much, I have no inspiration to learn it.
#14
Quote by ouchies
Theres very little dissonance in it


Hence why I find it a very uninspiring scale, and have not bothered to learn it yet.
#16
Quote by ouchies
I wouldn't say it's uninspiring, not learning it is just one less thing you know. If used sparingly it can be a lot of fun and sound real nice


Fair enough, but I'd rather be comfortable with alot of other scales first, as I think they will be more useful.
#17
Isaac, you're making a mistake. Minor pentatonic is vital to rock soloing.


I also rather like using the minor pentatonic scale over chords containing the 2nd and 6th.
#18
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Isaac, you're making a mistake. Minor pentatonic is vital to rock soloing.


I also rather like using the minor pentatonic scale over chords containing the 2nd and 6th.


I have never yet come upon a minor song in which harmonic minor, and natural minor do not work, yet.

I will eventually learn the minor pentatonic, but its not high on my priority list. Just because its what alot of others do, that doesnt mean I must do that.
#19
Santana's "Oye Como Va" does not "allow" natural or harmonic minor. A combination of minor pentatonic, Dorian, and blues would be ideal. The progression is Am7 D7 C.
#20
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Santana's "Oye Como Va" does not "allow" natural or harmonic minor. A combination of minor pentatonic, Dorian, and blues would be ideal. The progression is Am7 D7 C.


Wouldn't that be called a modal piece using A Dorian?

I would rather learn the diatonic modes than the pentatonics.
#21
Quote by isaac_bandits
Wouldn't that be called a modal piece using A Dorian? Yes

I would rather learn the diatonic modes than the pentatonics. You don't have to choose; learn all of them! The minor pentatonic, however, is essential for rock soloing.
#22
Isaac, well I'm guessing if you solo over a standard minor key rock type thing, you will kind of naturally gravitate away from the 2nd and 6th because they don't fit quite as well. Might use them as passing tones, but they're a little harder to hang on in a rockey progression, so you're basically using pentatonics. Assuming I'm wrong, I'd like to hear you solo over said rockey progression with natural or harmonic minor(harmonic especially), might be an interesting new approach to me.