#1
What arpeggios are these 2:

Arpeggio 1

e----------11-15
b--------13------13
g------12----------12
d---13---------------13
a-15-------------------15
e-


Arpeggio 2


e-----------8-12
b---------10----10
g--------9---------9
d----10------------10
a-12-----------------12
e-


Sorry i suck at tabbing but this is the best I could do of the 2 arpeggios. What are they?
#2
If I'm correct, the first is just a Cm arpeggio, the second is a C Major (or rather Am, since it starts on the A).
#4
So its C minor and A minor. Thats what I thought they were. I knew they were minor arpeggios and thought they were A minor and C minor but wasnt exactly sure.

What are some other arpeggio shapes i can play sorta like these. I already know the major pattern of just moving the 11 on the high E to the 12th in the Cm and 8th to the 9th in Am. What are other shapes u can use?
#5
Quote by ravenrage07
So its C minor and A minor. Thats what I thought they were. I knew they were minor arpeggios and thought they were A minor and C minor but wasnt exactly sure.

What are some other arpeggio shapes i can play sorta like these. I already know the major pattern of just moving the 11 on the high E to the 12th in the Cm and 8th to the 9th in Am. What are other shapes u can use?

It's easier to do it yourself. Just pick a key, lay it on the fretboard, and see what sweeping patterns you can pick out.
#6
Quote by Archaon
the second is a C Major
No! There is no A note in a C chord. I suppose you could call it a C6 arpeggio, but Am is probably the better name. While the 5th is omitted from the C6 arp, the 5th is not very important. However, given that Am is a stronger (for lack of a better term, someone can give a better word) sound than C6, it should be called Am.

It has nothing to do with where it starts. -12-5-8-5- on the high E string is an Am arp, even though it starts on E.

Quote by Archaon
see what sweeping patterns you can pick out.

It is commonly, but incorrectly, thought that arpeggios and sweeps are the same thing. Sweep picking is usually used to play an arp, but arps are usually played with a technique other than sweeping (tapping, alternate picking, fingerstyle...).

For making shapes, there is an arpeggio finder under basics on wholenote.com, but you can just pick a chord, determine the notes used, and play those notes anywhere to form an arp.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Apr 25, 2008,
#7
Quote by bangoodcharlote
No! There is no A note in a C chord. I suppose you could call it a C6 arpeggio, but Am is probably the better name. While the 5th is omitted from the C6 arp, the 5th is not very important. However, given that Am is a stronger (for lack of a better term, someone can give a better word) sound than C6, it should be called Am.

It has nothing to do with where it starts. -12-5-8-5- on the high E string is an Am arp, even though it starts on E.


I corrected my mistake in that post (somewhat)


Quote by bangoodcharlote
It is commonly, but incorrectly, thought that arpeggios and sweeps are the same thing. Sweep picking is usually used to play an arp, but arps are usually played with a technique other than sweeping (tapping, alternate picking, fingerstyle...).

For making shapes, there is an arpeggio finder under basics on wholenote.com, but you can just pick a chord, determine the notes used, and play those notes anywhere to form an arp.

I have no excuse for this, I know I'm wrong, it was just an error on reading. I assumed he wanted sweeping patterns.

But thanks for the lessons.
#10
Quote by bangoodcharlote


It has nothing to do with where it starts. -12-5-8-5- on the high E string is an Am arp, even though it starts on E.





I believe the word you're looking for is called inversion. An A minor arpeggio that starts on E would be a Am (64) inversion.
#12
Quote by acoustic_guy7
I believe the word you're looking for is called inversion. An A minor arpeggio that starts on E would be a Am (64) inversion.
I fail to see how it's an inversion; the root is the lowest note!
#13
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I fail to see how it's an inversion; the root is the lowest note!


Right on! I don't know what I was thinking last night when I wrote that. For some reason I was thinking that arpeggio started on an E.