#1
Do the Epiphone Alpine White LP Customs fade into the antique yellow-ish color like the Gibsons do? It's just a question thats always been in my mind.

I know about the new Antique White Epi Customs they just put out, I was just wondering if the normal ones fade into that color.
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#2
noone knows?
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#3
I'd say no. The yellow colour is what happens to nitrocellulose when it ages. Epiphones are cleared with polyurethane, which doesn't age visually. I think that's a good thing.
#4
even such... it would take about 20 years in tons of UV to yellow
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#5
Will it fade with age? No. Will it fade via other methods? Maybe.


Maybe if you put it in a box, get like 5 packs of cigarettes and other substances, it might fade.
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#7
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The yellowish fade comes with age right?


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The yellow colour is what happens to nitrocellulose when it ages. Epiphones are cleared with polyurethane, which doesn't age visually.



...

No, I don't think so...
#8
A user on MLP has pictures of one of his Elitist series Epi customs in white, the first pic is white as you would see in a store. The most recent one which he pointed out has turned a light yellowish color with a slightly creamier darker white.

I can't really say from personal experiance but if he did manage to age his Elitist it would probably work with the normal lower end Customs. Though it may take longer than a Gibson to age due to the thick finish.
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#9
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even such... it would take about 20 years in tons of UV to yellow


20 years? Randy Rhoads' cream colored LP took 20 years to fade into that?

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Last edited by Slash546 at Apr 25, 2008,
#10
Yeah the guys Elitist I was referring to couldn't have been more than a few years old.
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#11
Yea I'd say a good 20yrs, my Kramer is from '86 and its turned into a nice cream color too, actually looks a bit lighter in this picture cause of the sunlight

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#12
Those guitars you're talking about have the thinner nitro lacquer finish though. Epiphone Customs have a thick plastic-based poly finish.


An Epiphone 'Alpine White' (their 'true' white - tough technically it's 2% blue) guitar will age - but it does take much longer than nitro-finished guitars do (e.g. Gibsons, Fenders).

This is actually part of the appeal of Epiphone's high-end (Elitist) guitars. You can get the same (if not better) quality as Gibson or Fender, but the thick plastic poly finish gives a darker tone (often liked by blues and jazz guitarists - hence why Epi's archtops are the most expensive in the world - and also by dark/gothic metal guitarists), plus the thick finish won't fade as fast, and it's more resilient to dents, chips and scratches.


Generally speaking, a Gibson white Custom that is used a lot and often left out in daylight will start to discolour in about six years, and will be noticeably yellow-tinged by ten to twelve.
An Epiphone on the other hand, will take about that nine years to start discolouring under the same conditions, and will be fully 'vintage white' once it's about sixteen or seventeen years old. It is possible, if you don't use the guitar much and keep it out of sunlight, that it could stretch to twenty years with only minimal discolouration.

Or of course, if you use it in direct sunlight every single day for hours and hours, it will discolour much sooner.

And, if you ever want the creamy vintage tone, Epiphone do of course make a lot of their guitars in an already tinted 'vintage white' finish.