#1
(I got insomnia and am terribly bored)

Here's a few, contribute more or flame on at your own pleasure.

1)Buy a guitar made in the United States
2)Buy an amp made in the United Kingdom
3)If you like single-coils, buy a Fender
4)If you like humbuckers, buy a Gibson
5)If you like metal, buy a Jackson
6)If you heavily distort your tone its perfectilly ok to play on a solid state(no matter your skill level)
7)FR's and EMG's cannot be put onto just any P.O.S.
8)If you need 8, 9, 10 strings buy a harp
9)Signature guitars are bad
10)Amp=80% of your tone, pups=30%, wood=20%, hardware=10%, your fingertips=>5%
Why you reading this?
Quote by 742627000017
I use my thumb and my johnson

Quote by deanexplosion99
idk what the keys are for but the reason i think its for the floyd rose is because its called floyd rose double locking

Quote by niggafolife
i iz hurr tuh spek da troof abowt muzik
#2
Quote by plucky duck
(I got insomnia and am terribly bored)

Here's a few, contribute more or flame on at your own pleasure.

10)Amp=80% of your tone, pups=30%, wood=20%, hardware=10%, your fingertips=>5%


That's 145%....
Keeping it real since '92
#3
I know. It seems to be a unanimous opinion that amp makes 60-80% your tone but i always think its less for those other factors.

PS its only about 145% because fingertips wernt exactlly 5% haha
Why you reading this?
Quote by 742627000017
I use my thumb and my johnson

Quote by deanexplosion99
idk what the keys are for but the reason i think its for the floyd rose is because its called floyd rose double locking

Quote by niggafolife
i iz hurr tuh spek da troof abowt muzik
#4
Signature guitars arent always bad. Like the Troy van Leeuwen sig has some cool extra features you wont find almost anywhere. I would add Ibanez to the "If you like metal" category. Especially since they make the S series with ZR trems and the Iceman.
#5
Wood makes none of your tone whatsoever. Unless you're playing an acoustic.
The DNA results show that Jeremy Kyle is a nob.


Quote by titsmcgee852
I want to look at your sexual naked body.
#6
The wood does actually deal with the tone if you are playing with passive pickups or an acoustic as said before
Quote by thefitz
Interesting. It turns out that there are people on the forum who play an upright bass. I'll make a note of that.

*makes note*

*puts note on wall*

*stares at note for a minute*

*sits back down and resumes doing what I was doing*
#7
The base of your tone on any guitar and most important factor I believe starts with the type of wood and neck/fingerboard your guitar is made out of as well as the quality in which its put together. Your amp makes up a large percentage of that also and thats all great and everything but ultimately your tone comes from your fingers.
2003 Music Man Axis Pacific Blue Burst
#8
I always figgured the density and timbre of the timber that the pick-ups, bridge and neck are mounted to greatly effects your tone cause the whole guitar shakes(viberates) as the strings do. so (in working with my theroy) an ash or maple guitar will be much sharper than a say basswood guitar.

Energy from the strings is dampened and absorbed by the wood, different woods return different amounts of energy back to the strings and therfore make different tones. (or so i reckon)
Why you reading this?
Quote by 742627000017
I use my thumb and my johnson

Quote by deanexplosion99
idk what the keys are for but the reason i think its for the floyd rose is because its called floyd rose double locking

Quote by niggafolife
i iz hurr tuh spek da troof abowt muzik
#9
Quote by plucky duck
I always figgured the density and timbre of the timber that the pick-ups, bridge and neck are mounted to greatly effects your tone cause the whole guitar shakes(viberates) as the strings do. so (in working with my theroy) an ash or maple guitar will be much sharper than a say basswood guitar.

Energy from the strings is dampened and absorbed by the wood, different woods return different amounts of energy back to the strings and therfore make different tones. (or so i reckon)


Yup, like I said the base of your tone. If wood doesn't affect your tone like Ed Hunter claims, then why are there so many different woods out there? This page is a really good reference for your theory http://www.warmoth.com/guitar/options/options_bodywoods.cfm

Pickups bring out the characteristics of the wood that you want, or help you tame an overly bright or warm guitar. I'm talking about passive pickups here of course, actives are hardly affected.
2003 Music Man Axis Pacific Blue Burst
#10
Quote by DSOTM80
Yup, like I said the base of your tone. If wood doesn't affect your tone like Ed Hunter claims, then why are there so many different woods out there? This page is a really good reference for your theory http://www.warmoth.com/guitar/options/options_bodywoods.cfm

Pickups bring out the characteristics of the wood that you want, or help you tame an overly bright or warm guitar. I'm talking about passive pickups here of course, actives are hardly affected.


Different weights, different durability. The whole point of a solid body guitar is so that the wood doesn't vibrate and mess with the tone given to your pickups. I know full well that no one on UG will believe me on this because they generally listen to other UGers who claim to have an idea of how guitars/amps work but evidently don't. For example, a hybrid amp made to a high standard will sound perfectly good as a full tube.
The DNA results show that Jeremy Kyle is a nob.


Quote by titsmcgee852
I want to look at your sexual naked body.
#11
you're a UGer too
Why you reading this?
Quote by 742627000017
I use my thumb and my johnson

Quote by deanexplosion99
idk what the keys are for but the reason i think its for the floyd rose is because its called floyd rose double locking

Quote by niggafolife
i iz hurr tuh spek da troof abowt muzik
#12
Quote by Ed Hunter
Wood makes none of your tone whatsoever. Unless you're playing an acoustic.


#13
Quote by Ed Hunter
Different weights, different durability. The whole point of a solid body guitar is so that the wood doesn't vibrate and mess with the tone given to your pickups. I know full well that no one on UG will believe me on this because they generally listen to other UGers who claim to have an idea of how guitars/amps work but evidently don't. For example, a hybrid amp made to a high standard will sound perfectly good as a full tube.


Pick up your electric, have it unplugged and pluck some strings then place your palm on the body and feel the wood vibrate

Besides like I said before, if wood doesn't affect the tone then why are there so many different types of wood used? And its not about durability. Besides, take the same pickup and place it into a Les Paul that has a mahogany body then put it into a Strat with an alder body. If your theory that pickups give the tone then why will it sound completely different in each guitar?
2003 Music Man Axis Pacific Blue Burst
#14
Quote by DSOTM80
Pick up your electric, have it unplugged and pluck some strings then place your palm on the body and feel the wood vibrate

Besides like I said before, if wood doesn't affect the tone then why are there so many different types of wood used? And its not about durability. Besides, take the same pickup and place it into a Les Paul that has a mahogany body then put it into a Strat with an alder body. If your theory that pickups give the tone then why will it sound completely different in each guitar?



I picked up my electric unplugged, plucked some strings, placed my palm on the body and felt nothing. The tone changes due to the different amounts of vibration in the string caused by a different bridge, intonation, string height etc.

I seem to have caused a stir in this thread.
The DNA results show that Jeremy Kyle is a nob.


Quote by titsmcgee852
I want to look at your sexual naked body.
#15
Quote by Ed Hunter
I seem to have caused a stir in this thread.
yep. and thank you for that. civil disagreements and debate are fun.

as for not feeling vibration in your guitar, i dont know how thats possible.
do you have a floating trem? minor nerve damage?
Why you reading this?
Quote by 742627000017
I use my thumb and my johnson

Quote by deanexplosion99
idk what the keys are for but the reason i think its for the floyd rose is because its called floyd rose double locking

Quote by niggafolife
i iz hurr tuh spek da troof abowt muzik
#16
I have one with a floating trem and one with a stop tail. The strings don't touch the body in either so that could be why.
The DNA results show that Jeremy Kyle is a nob.


Quote by titsmcgee852
I want to look at your sexual naked body.
#17
Quote by Ed Hunter
I picked up my electric unplugged, plucked some strings, placed my palm on the body and felt nothing. The tone changes due to the different amounts of vibration in the string caused by a different bridge, intonation, string height etc.

I seem to have caused a stir in this thread.


Tone changes due to intonation? Yea if your intonation isn't set properly it'll sound out of tune the further you go down the fretboard. Higher action gives you a cleaner sound and possibly longer sustain due to the fact that you'll have zero fret buzz but will be more difficult to play but thats it, and yes different type bridges give off different tones. Now think about it, if a different type bridge gives off different tones but wood doesn't? That makes no sense. The bridge is attached to the body of the guitar I dunno why I'm still trying to explain this to you. The link I posted from Warmoth is more then anyone needs. Gotta love those "UG" theories huh

Edit:

...and if you didn't feel your electric's body vibrate then thats a pretty cheap guitar then
2003 Music Man Axis Pacific Blue Burst
#18
Why doesn't it make any sense?

Edit: I wouldn't say an EC-1000 was a cheap guitar myself. Just mahogany is quite a dense wood and therefore there would be very little vibration through it.
The DNA results show that Jeremy Kyle is a nob.


Quote by titsmcgee852
I want to look at your sexual naked body.
#19
the strings touch the body by proxy through the bridge(said for any non-string-through) you'd feel the vibes from a stop-tail just as strong as a fixed bridge string through.
i had a guitar with a stop peice and a TOM and i could feel the vibe throughout.
strange.
Why you reading this?
Quote by 742627000017
I use my thumb and my johnson

Quote by deanexplosion99
idk what the keys are for but the reason i think its for the floyd rose is because its called floyd rose double locking

Quote by niggafolife
i iz hurr tuh spek da troof abowt muzik
#20
Quote by plucky duck
the strings touch the body by proxy through the bridge(said for any non-string-through) you'd feel the vibes from a stop-tail just as strong as a fixed bridge string through.
i had a guitar with a stop peice and a TOM and i could feel the vibe throughout.
strange.


Read above post.
The DNA results show that Jeremy Kyle is a nob.


Quote by titsmcgee852
I want to look at your sexual naked body.
#21
Well I guess you know it all and everyone is wrong, especially guitar manufacturers and builders. What do they know right
(source:http://www.warmoth.com/guitar/options/options_bodywoods.cfm)


Mahogany (Khaya ivorensis):
We use African Mahogany in our body production. It is a medium to heavy weight wood with a Strat® body averaging 5 lbs. or more. Mahogany is a fine grained wood with great musical properties. The tone is warm and full with good sustain. The favorite tone wood of the Gibson® brand name; associated with some of the most famous rock music of our time. The grain is easy to fill. Looks good with clear or transparent red finish.

Maple
(Acer saccharum-Hard Maple):
We offer two types of Maple: Eastern Hard Maple (hard rock maple) and Western Soft Maple (big leaf maple).

Hard Maple is a very hard, heavy and dense wood. This is the same wood that we use on our necks. The grain is closed and very easy to finish. The tone is very bright with long sustain and a lot of bite. This wood cannot be dyed. It looks great with clear or transparent color finishes.
2003 Music Man Axis Pacific Blue Burst
#22
well denser body wood viberates better/more/stronger. the harder the bodywood the less energy the guitar body will absorb, so it'll transmit more energy(viberate more).

eg.hit a steel post with a baseball bat(louisville sluggers are made of white ash, great for teles) the bat will send most of the energy you put out back at you and it'll feel like you broke your wrist. hit the same post with a chunk of pine and you feel alot less. ash is harder than the pine so the ash conducts the energy better, absorbing less viberation.

did i make sense? sometimes i dont
Why you reading this?
Quote by 742627000017
I use my thumb and my johnson

Quote by deanexplosion99
idk what the keys are for but the reason i think its for the floyd rose is because its called floyd rose double locking

Quote by niggafolife
i iz hurr tuh spek da troof abowt muzik
#23
Quote by DSOTM80
Well I guess you know it all and everyone is wrong, especially guitar manufacturers and builders. What do they know right
(source:http://www.warmoth.com/guitar/options/options_bodywoods.cfm)


Mahogany (Khaya ivorensis):
We use African Mahogany in our body production. It is a medium to heavy weight wood with a Strat® body averaging 5 lbs. or more. Mahogany is a fine grained wood with great musical properties. The tone is warm and full with good sustain. The favorite tone wood of the Gibson® brand name; associated with some of the most famous rock music of our time. The grain is easy to fill. Looks good with clear or transparent red finish.

Maple
(Acer saccharum-Hard Maple):
We offer two types of Maple: Eastern Hard Maple (hard rock maple) and Western Soft Maple (big leaf maple).

Hard Maple is a very hard, heavy and dense wood. This is the same wood that we use on our necks. The grain is closed and very easy to finish. The tone is very bright with long sustain and a lot of bite. This wood cannot be dyed. It looks great with clear or transparent color finishes.



The tone is 'warm'. What the hell is a 'warm' tone? That site uses adjectives that can't really be associated to music to describe what 'tone' it gives. However, I agree that certain woods will give good sustain whereas others not so good. To be honest, I don't really care what this website says, they're not going to say 'oh this wood makes bugger all difference'. They say it changes it in order to sell it. You make me two guitars with identical specifications but out of two different woods and see if it makes any noticeable difference.
The DNA results show that Jeremy Kyle is a nob.


Quote by titsmcgee852
I want to look at your sexual naked body.
#24
warm tone means soft(sorta) think les paul.
Why you reading this?
Quote by 742627000017
I use my thumb and my johnson

Quote by deanexplosion99
idk what the keys are for but the reason i think its for the floyd rose is because its called floyd rose double locking

Quote by niggafolife
i iz hurr tuh spek da troof abowt muzik
#25
Quote by Ed Hunter
The tone is 'warm'. What the hell is a 'warm' tone? That site uses adjectives that can't really be associated to music to describe what 'tone' it gives. However, I agree that certain woods will give good sustain whereas others not so good. To be honest, I don't really care what this website says, they're not going to say 'oh this wood makes bugger all difference'. They say it changes it in order to sell it. You make me two guitars with identical specifications but out of two different woods and see if it makes any noticeable difference.


Go play a mahogany Strat and an Ash Strat and you'll notice the difference. Everything else being equal. Oh and 'warm' is used quite a lot in describing tone Everyone from reviewers in magazines to musicians use it
2003 Music Man Axis Pacific Blue Burst
#26
where'd Ed go??? is the debate over?
Why you reading this?
Quote by 742627000017
I use my thumb and my johnson

Quote by deanexplosion99
idk what the keys are for but the reason i think its for the floyd rose is because its called floyd rose double locking

Quote by niggafolife
i iz hurr tuh spek da troof abowt muzik
#27
Of course the wood affects tone. Every part of your guitar that has some mass will contribute to the forces damping the vibrations of the strings (a very 'hand wavey' way of looking at it, but it works, and is much easier than trying to consider all the boundary conditions on such a complicated equation). Damping forces do not have a constant effect across the entire frequency spectrum, and how much of an effect it will have at different frequencies will depend on the natural frequencies of the various parts of the guitar. Thus, different woods will have different frequency responses, as will bridges, nuts, strings, etc. Of course, what is really up for debate, is the size of the effect each component has. Only way you can figure that out is with some very accurate and time consuming approximations, or by very detailed and time consuming experiment.
#28
Quote by plucky duck

Amp=80% of your tone, pups=30%, wood=20%, hardware=10%, your fingertips=>5%

or you could make up some bull sh*t numbers
Why you reading this?
Quote by 742627000017
I use my thumb and my johnson

Quote by deanexplosion99
idk what the keys are for but the reason i think its for the floyd rose is because its called floyd rose double locking

Quote by niggafolife
i iz hurr tuh spek da troof abowt muzik
#29
Quote by Ed Hunter
Wood makes none of your tone whatsoever. Unless you're playing an acoustic.

wow just leave right now
#30
Quote by Ed Hunter
Different weights, different durability. The whole point of a solid body guitar is so that the wood doesn't vibrate and mess with the tone given to your pickups. I know full well that no one on UG will believe me on this because they generally listen to other UGers who claim to have an idea of how guitars/amps work but evidently don't. For example, a hybrid amp made to a high standard will sound perfectly good as a full tube.



I think back in January someone started a thread about wood not making a differecne in tone when PLUGGED in. Proved it with computer stuff. MAybe we should find that thread?
#31
Quote by Steel8909
I think back in January someone started a thread about wood not making a differecne in tone when PLUGGED in. Proved it with computer stuff. MAybe we should find that thread?


I would possibly agree to that, with active pickups but not passive
2003 Music Man Axis Pacific Blue Burst
#33
Quote by ++BuCkEtHeAd++
my damien FR body vibrates


Both my Kramers do, the Focus much more cause of the Floyd sitting on the body. Also why are vintage guitars sought after? One of the reasons is the older wood. Guitars, both acoustic or electric, age like fine wine and get better over time
2003 Music Man Axis Pacific Blue Burst
#34
Quote by Toolfan11
That's 145%....


Obviously you aren't playing loud enough.

Skeet UK is awesome, he can get WD Music parts discounted.
#35
Quote by Ed Hunter
Wood makes none of your tone whatsoever. Unless you're playing an acoustic.

bull... play a les pal then pick up a jakson or ibanez its a whole different tone...
#36
Quote by gothic_freak
bull... play a les pal then pick up a jakson or ibanez its a whole different tone...



They don't have different pickups at all do they....

And even if they did, you'd have realised why they don't sound the same if you'd read my other posts.
The DNA results show that Jeremy Kyle is a nob.


Quote by titsmcgee852
I want to look at your sexual naked body.
#37
Quote by Steel8909
I think back in January someone started a thread about wood not making a differecne in tone when PLUGGED in. Proved it with computer stuff. MAybe we should find that thread?



Which is what I was talking about from the start yet no one seems to have picked up on it. Yes, that thread would be appreciated.

I apologise for the double post this may have caused.

Edit: I'll concede that passives may have their tone altered slightly by different woods what with the minimal disturbance of the magnetic field it might cause.
The DNA results show that Jeremy Kyle is a nob.


Quote by titsmcgee852
I want to look at your sexual naked body.
Last edited by Ed Hunter at Apr 26, 2008,