#1
Ok this might be weird but when i use the major scale i always use a three note per string patern.

Ive looked on the net and all i can find are the box patterns.

So does anyone have a three note per string pattern for minor pentatonic/harmonic minor scales?

#2
Pentatonics, being well...pentatonic(having five notes and thus "missing" two from the diatonic), are much more practical to play in the traditional 2-per string "box" patterns because there would be quite a bit of shifting involved in a 3-per string pattern, which essentially defeats the purpose of the pattern thing. Harmonic minor, for say A minor, is as follows:
--------------------------------7-8-10-
-------------------------6-9-10--------
-------------------5-7-9---------------
-------------6-7-9---------------------
-------5-7-8---------------------------
-5-7-8---------------------------------


However, as just about everyone here will tell you, scales are a collection of notes, not patterns(man, that should be like the MT creed or something). C major is the notes C D E F G A B, which can be played anywhere on the neck, not an 8-10-12 8-10-12 9-10-12 etc. pattern. What the box patterns do is give you a convenient way to not sound like crap in any given key. However, there is only so much you can do within the context of a box. Thinking of a scale as notes opens up so many more possibilities. Of course, DO be familiar with a few patterns as it's not always easy to think of a blistering run note by note, but don't base your phrases off them too much.
#3
i found something like that in guitar world

he was talking about 3 note patterns in the major scale he was saying there are 3 patterns

whole whole ie 1 3 5 these are frets

whole half ie 1 3 4

half whole ei 1 2 4

those would all be in different keys but those are the patterns for the shapes
song stuck in my head today


Last edited by lbc_sublime at Apr 26, 2008,
#4
here's a C Major Scale

Notice that it's all over the fretboard? That's right scales are notes, not shapes. If you knew that already, you can pick out some interesting patterns for yourself.
#5
Quote by grampastumpy
Pentatonics, being well...pentatonic(having five notes and thus "missing" two from the diatonic), are much more practical to play in the traditional 2-per string "box" patterns because there would be quite a bit of shifting involved in a 3-per string pattern, which essentially defeats the purpose of the pattern thing. Harmonic minor, for say A minor, is as follows:
--------------------------------7-8-10-
-------------------------6-9-10--------
-------------------5-7-9---------------
-------------6-7-9---------------------
-------5-7-8---------------------------
-5-7-8---------------------------------


However, as just about everyone here will tell you, scales are a collection of notes, not patterns(man, that should be like the MT creed or something). C major is the notes C D E F G A B, which can be played anywhere on the neck, not an 8-10-12 8-10-12 9-10-12 etc. pattern. What the box patterns do is give you a convenient way to not sound like crap in any given key. However, there is only so much you can do within the context of a box. Thinking of a scale as notes opens up so many more possibilities. Of course, DO be familiar with a few patterns as it's not always easy to think of a blistering run note by note, but don't base your phrases off them too much.


Awesone that wasalot of help thanks.
#6
Just tie 5 boxes pattern together and get one big pattern.

it just one big pattern to me. So i can slide or tap it wherever
and however.

I notice the arppgios of the chord.

The single box pattern just gives me a quick reference piont.
Once I notice the root, it's all down hill from there.
Or more open up, then i notice the b3 then the 5th and so on and forth.
#7
You can check out my 3 note per string primer here:

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=595483

It has all the patterns for major, harmonic and melodic minor as well as
pentatonics. YES, you can do pentatonics this way! It's a bit different than
the others, but it allows you to do some cool stuff. Although a warning: the
fingering is VERY difficult.

There's also diminished scale 3 NPS patterns which I didn't put there.
#8
Quote by Avedas
Notice that it's all over the fretboard? That's right scales are notes, not shapes. If you knew that already, you can pick out some interesting patterns for yourself.
All true, but the standard patterns are good to know.