#1
this is somthing that's been confusing me a little for a while, when you have a blues/rock riff,and it goes something like (confusing notes in bold) :
A;---------2---2--4--4--2
E;---3/4------0--0--0--0

Is it magor or minor?
#2
"Major" is the correct spelling.

Blues/rock is confusing. Often, you will have an E7 chord which has a major third, but you will use the Em Pentatonic scale over it anyway.

That riff you posted would be considered in the key of E major, but you would usually use the Em pentatonic and blues scale over it.
#3
It's technically major, although blues often incorporates a flattened 3rd, 5th and 7th, thus making the tonality ambiguous.
#4
its blues
I can't really explain it myself, its been mentioned in the past, search might show somethings up
its kind of both/neither at once


its as you can take a blues I IV V chord progression with dominant seventh chords all over then solo over it with the pentatonic minor and have it sound awesome
#5
Quote by bangoodcharlote
"Major" is the correct spelling.

Blues/rock is confusing. Often, you will have an E7 chord which has a major third, but you will use the Em Pentatonic scale over it anyway.

That riff you posted would be considered in the key of E major, but you would usually use the Em pentatonic and blues scale over it.


yeah, I had a feeling it might be something like that, has it got anything to do with the structure of 7th chords? Cos they've got the minor seventh in them.
#6
Quote by jimRH7
yeah, I had a feeling it might be something like that, has it got anything to do with the structure of 7th chords? Cos they've got the minor seventh in them.
It's not because the seventh is "minor." It has nothing to do with the naming being the same.

The 7 chord allows for a lot of chromatic tones to be played over it since it is inherently dissonant.


To make things easy, you just do it.
#7
That isnt neccesarily major nor minor, but seeing as its bluesy then ill go with major, even though the blues scale is based on the minor scale (with the 2nd and 6th degree missing and a flat 5th added) which is a scale used in blues more often than not.
#9
In the tab you posted both the major and minor third of E are present. However, when you play it, the G is usually played as a grace note leading into the G# making it have a more "major" feel. However, one could argue that the song is minor, or neither major nor minor. However, in this case that riff "feels" major to me, so I will say it is major.

Also, you might also find that you can solo over something like that using either the major or the minor scale and it will still sound good (or at least fairly decent).
#10
Blues doesn't quite adhere to conventional theory. That riff, in a blues context, implies an E7 chord, which, despite being built off a major triad, sounds fantastic with an E blues or minor pentatonic scale played over it. A lot of blues is tonally ambiguous; nowhere else does a minor third over a major chord fit so well. IMO it's best not analyzed as being major or minor, although this would be considered a major blues(misleadingly IMO). A minor blues is generally easier to analyze as it is more diatonic, are at least closer to it(i iv v(or V)).
#11
"Major" is the correct spelling.

Magor is cooler.

It's definately Magor
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