#1
ok this is it plain and simple. we cant figure out where to start in our recordings. its so goddamn hard. because our bassist cant play along to just a metronome and our rythem guitarist cant ethir. i cant solo over nothing, and the drummer claims that he needs something to listen to for "insperation". we have practiced these songs a million times and we play them live all the time with no problam. what can we do? i was wondering if we all played the song on our own instriments but only had one of them recording at a time (we use direct in). so would it work if we only plugged the bass in, then the rythem, then the drummer has something to listen to, and we can do vocals, then i can solo. would that work? and if it wont can someone give us advise, we need it. thank you to anyone who helps and i dont like it when people read it and dont contribute, if you read this, say something.
#2
have everybody play at once and use a direct line from bass player amp to recording thing then repeat with rythem guitarist then do drum track and so on
#3
well, my old band had this going on, too.

you kinda have the idea, but it would be easier if you plugged a guitar into something which would output as headphones and have your drummer listen to you/your guitarist play.
#4
record everyone at the same time on first track. then record one at the time with the first track playing in background... and when everyone is recorded individually delete the first track with everyone on it... you should have a good result
#5
what my band alway did was record a reallly crappy quality recording of the whole band playing together. Convert that to an mp3 and put it on ure drummers ipod
have him listen to that while recording his parts
Quote by pengiunman
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#6
ok thanks, another thing is how do you get rid of some of the computerized sound you get from direct in?
#7
find someone who has better equipment, mic the guitar amp, the bass amp, mic the bass drum, snare drum, and put two overhead mics over the drums. run that all into a mixer and with whatever program your using, have the guitar, bass, and drums all recording into seperate tracks. then just play the song live. make sure to record the drums at a low input volume so you level the bass and snare hits the right way.

i dont know if that made any sense to you, but trying to track record by yourself like your doing usually sounds worse than a taperecorder in the middle of the room. my band has tryed it for hours upon end and it never sounds like your playing as a band.

the mic on the macbook actually picks up sound good.... ive recorded jams with people on a macbook, if you have the instruments at the right volume, have the computer at a good distance, and can play it perfectly live, those recordings could work for you at the moment
gear

Fender Standard Tele (with kill-switch)
PRS SE Custom
Fender Hot Rod Deville
Boss DD-3 Delay
Boss GE-7 Eq
Boss DS-1 distortion
Electro-Harmonix Big Muff
Boss CS-3 Compression
Digitech Whammy
Dunlop ZW-45 Zakk Wylde Signature wah
#8
were a serious band that wants a good sounding EP. weve been around for a while and now we want to try our luck at a record so i want something that will sound good, not just "work"
#9
Quote by surge666
were a serious band that wants a good sounding EP. weve been around for a while and now we want to try our luck at a record so i want something that will sound good, not just "work"


then your best off finding a local studio (there are probably more than you think, check myspace) and paying for professional recordings.

not gonna lie, recording blows dude haha
gear

Fender Standard Tele (with kill-switch)
PRS SE Custom
Fender Hot Rod Deville
Boss DD-3 Delay
Boss GE-7 Eq
Boss DS-1 distortion
Electro-Harmonix Big Muff
Boss CS-3 Compression
Digitech Whammy
Dunlop ZW-45 Zakk Wylde Signature wah
#10
so should i record the ****ty jam all in one then make it an mp3 and put it on our ipods. then hit the studio? because this stuff is by the hour so we should come prepared no?
#11
My band uses SM58's, SM57's, a full drum mic set, condenser mics, Pro Tools, and an 8 track mixer. And our recordings still don't sound anywhere near professional quality. What we're missing is an audio engineer. Even though we have fairly decent equipment, we don't have the experience of an audio engineer. That's the true benefit of going to a studio.

so should i record the ****ty jam all in one then make it an mp3 and put it on our ipods. then hit the studio? because this stuff is by the hour so we should come prepared no?

Ya, that's a good idea. My band uses our home equipment to record demos and we're going to be heading to a real studio for the "final" versions. So just record your rough versions with whatever you have now.
#12
Quote by surge666
so should i record the ****ty jam all in one then make it an mp3 and put it on our ipods. then hit the studio? because this stuff is by the hour so we should come prepared no?


no, a studio setting is probably going to be way different than how your set up now. you could possibly record the way i described earlier, or you guys will play live over and over again and isolate parts and record track by track.

definitly browse around if your gonna end up going to a studio, some places are cheaper than others, some places actually charge a flat rate. if your gonna be selling cds and you think you'll make the money back, then doing studio recordings is definitly worth it.
gear

Fender Standard Tele (with kill-switch)
PRS SE Custom
Fender Hot Rod Deville
Boss DD-3 Delay
Boss GE-7 Eq
Boss DS-1 distortion
Electro-Harmonix Big Muff
Boss CS-3 Compression
Digitech Whammy
Dunlop ZW-45 Zakk Wylde Signature wah
#13
i meant, record the jam so we can have something for the timing in the studio, would that work?
#14
As someone who has other bands to come into record, HERE is some of the advice I give them. And a bit more....

I like to have a rehearsal recording or something in advance, if possible - no matter how crappy. It gives me an idea of what I'm working with in terms of style of music, general musical competence, basic song arrangement, and considering all that, I can best plan out how I think the finished product could sound. I discuss the goals with the client, and hearing the material really helps to set a direction from there.

Think of recording like learning any other instrument. You start off with some cheap gear and no skill and turn out crap for the first year. As you continue to invest both money in your gear, and time into learning how to use it, and developing your chops practicing, you get better. Would you join a band, as a guitarist, with three months playing experience? Obviously not. In that light, it sounds funny to hear people talking about how they're just going to go out this weekend, buy some gear, and start making their band's CD right away.

My focus for the past ten years has been on a lot of things other than guitar - learning to record being one of them. My guitar playing has suffered because of it, but something has to give somewhere.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Apr 26, 2008,
#15
Plenty of bands just record everything at once. I like it better, the parts just seem to groove better.
#16
Hmmm.... sort of. They'll record what is called the 'bed tracks' live off the floor. That is, drums, bass, and rhythm guitar parts, essentially. Now, just because they are recording them all at once doesn't mean the old 1950's approach of 'two mics in a room and go.' Everything is carefully set up for the best possible isolation, so if you want to tweak the EQ on the bass drum, add reverb to the snare, compress the bass, and put a bit of chorus on the guitars, you can, because they're all on their own separate track.

That takes a pretty sophisticated setup and a bit of cash to do it - supported by some sometimes creative use of the physical space you're recording in.

From there, more guitar parts are overdubbed, mistakes in the bass are punched in, solos and vocals overdubbed, etc.

Yeah, rarely is a whole song recorded one track at a time.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#17
My band recorded 3 songs in the space of about 4 hours, it wasn't the best idea, but we went to the recording studio and they basically said, spend all your money laying the tracks down one by one or spend a fraction of the price and record it all at once, with seperate tracks for every instrument. Saved us money, and if it wasn't for shoddy mastering, we would have some good sounding tracks.
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