#1
I'm really new to music theory and I really want to learn a lot about it. But my biggest issue, that none of the lessons on this site (or any site) really addresses is, what the hell do i do with the scales and chords, when put together. So my question is, when I create a Chord Progression say, Cmaj-->Fm7-->Dm-->G7 (just picking random chords), would my bassline and/or riff follow the scale modes that fit those chords. So for example, would the riff go from Ionian to Dorian to Aeolian to Mixolydian? Or would it stay based in one scale. And if I'm totally wrong please point me in the right direction. Thanks a lot!
#2
If you have a chord progression, you could just try and follow the chord progression with your bass line. By that I mean just doing something as playing the root and fifth of the chord or playing full arpeggios of the chords as your bass line.
12 fret fury
#3
Quote by Punk Poser
If you have a chord progression, you could just try and follow the chord progression with your bass line. By that I mean just doing something as playing the root and fifth of the chord or playing full arpeggios of the chords as your bass line.


so if i were to be doing a Cmaj Chord (EADGBe 032010) I would do that same thing on the bass minus the B and e strings? or would I play C and then E with some other stuff in between that would be based on the scale of that note?
#4
Whatever sounds good. And there's lots of things that sound good. Basically, it's a good idea to stay in the key and follow the chord tones.

would my bassline and/or riff follow the scale modes that fit those chords
If you want. It could sound quite good.
would the riff go from Ionian to Dorian to Aeolian to Mixolydian? Or would it stay based in one scale
You could do either, or some combination of those two methods.
I would do that same thing on the bass minus the B and e strings?
Sure
or would I play C and then E with some other stuff in between that would be based on the scale of that note?
Yeah sounds good to me.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#5
you could do scales or arpeggios, whatever you want. its best though to play chord tones (C Major: C E G) and transition them into the next chords chord tones. For example, if you were playing E of the C major chord, and the next chord is G Major (G B D), you could go down to B, or up to D, your choice. Or if you wanted to jump around a little more, you could go up to G. Thats a very affective way of creating bass lines. Then once you get those down, you could throw in some leading tones, or walking up to the next note by playing the scale.
#6
Just do whatever the hell you feel like. There are no exact set rules for what to play. But yes, if you want something consonant for the chord-progression and bass, follow Punk Poser's advice.

As for switching off scales to fit the chord progression, that's little drastic if your writing a score. Let's say you have the lead riff C Ionian scale (or actually, the whole song), just notate the accidental notes instead changing scale. But idk the whole context of what your doing, so all this is probably just pointless dribble.
#7
Quote by mattj2192
I'm really new to music theory and I really want to learn a lot about it. But my biggest issue, that none of the lessons on this site (or any site) really addresses is, what the hell do i do with the scales and chords, when put together. So my question is, when I create a Chord Progression say, Cmaj-->Fm7-->Dm-->G7 (just picking random chords), would my bassline and/or riff follow the scale modes that fit those chords. So for example, would the riff go from Ionian to Dorian to Aeolian to Mixolydian? Or would it stay based in one scale. And if I'm totally wrong please point me in the right direction. Thanks a lot!

Well, if you're new to music theory don't dive into modes just yet.

That's not a modal progression, so just go based on chord tones.
#9
Quote by mattj2192
well im not that new i know everything up to modes and then i get lost.

It's still not a modal progression, so don't treat it as such.
#10
Quote by Punk Poser
If you have a chord progression, you could just try and follow the chord progression with your bass line. By that I mean just doing something as playing the root and fifth of the chord or playing full arpeggios of the chords as your bass line.


Going from the root to the fifth with notes leading up to the fifth works pretty well.
#11
Quote by mattj2192
I'm really new to music theory and I really want to learn a lot about it. But my biggest issue, that none of the lessons on this site (or any site) really addresses is, what the hell do i do with the scales and chords, when put together. So my question is, when I create a Chord Progression say, Cmaj-->Fm7-->Dm-->G7 (just picking random chords), would my bassline and/or riff follow the scale modes that fit those chords. So for example, would the riff go from Ionian to Dorian to Aeolian to Mixolydian? Or would it stay based in one scale. And if I'm totally wrong please point me in the right direction. Thanks a lot!


ok, one way to compose the bassline would be using arpeggios(or playing a chord note by note instead of simultaneously) and approach tones. so for example, if your chord progression was G-C-E-D, (i made this up previously) your bassline would go like this G-B-D-B-C-E-G- then then an aproach tone for E. this is a technique used to get a walking bassline.
as for the relation of chords to scales or vice versa. certain chords go well with certain scales. for example, if the chord is major, then you would make a bassline from the Ionian scale (the major scale). if the chord is diminished, then you would make the bassline from the locrian scale. if you google the relation between chords and scales you'll hopefully find a chart. good luck
#12
sorry if some of that doesnt make sense to you, i was typing that in school and then all of a sudden one of the teachers made everyone get off the computers...
#13
Quote by Urban1ninja
if the chord is diminished, then you would make the bassline from the locrian scale. if you google the relation between chords and scales you'll hopefully find a chart. good luck

No, the Locrian mode is characterized by a half-diminished seventh chord (m7b5). The Locrian scale and diminished scales are not the same thing.