#1
what are minors majors 6ths 7ths and all the other stuff in that catogorie
and how do the fit in with the scales
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#4
Those terms refer to the distance from another note. Starting with the same note it goes unison/minor second/major second/minor third/major third-diminished fourth/perfect fourth/augmented fourth-diminished fifth/perfect fifth-augmented fifth/minor sixth/major sixth/minor seventh/major seventh/octave.

a minor key is made out of Unison (Root)/major second/minor third/perfect fourth/perfect fifth/minor sixth/minor seventh.
a major key is made out of Unison/major second/major third/perfect fourth/perfect fifth/major sixth/major seventh.
Last edited by Macabre_Turtle at Apr 27, 2008,
#5
Quote by bandet232
what are minors majors 6ths 7ths and all the other stuff in that catogorie
and how do the fit in with the scales

Ask a specific question. This is like saying "explain the fundamentals of music to me in one post".
#6
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
Those terms refer to the distance from another note. Starting with the same note it goes unison/minor second/major second/minor third/major third-diminished fourth/perfect fourth/augmented fourth-diminished fifth/perfect fifth-augmented fifth/minor sixth/major sixth/minor seventh/major seventh/octave.

a minor key is made out of Unison (Root)/major second/minor third/perfect fourth/perfect fifth/minor sixth/minor seventh.
a major key is made out of Unison/major second/major third/perfect fourth/perfect fifth/major sixth/major seventh.


you mean
Interval |   Name                  | Note.(In C)
-----------------------------------------------
  1      |  Unison (root note)     |  C
 b2      |  Minor Second           |  Db
  2      |  Major Second           |  D
 #2      |  Sharp Second           |  D#
 b3      |  Minor Third            |  Eb
  3      |  Major Third            |  E
  4      |  Perfect Fourth         |  F
 #4      |  Augmented Fourth       |  F#
 b5      |  Diminished Fifth       |  Gb
  5      |  Perfect Fifth          |  G
 #5      |  Augmented Fifth        |  G#
 b6      |  Minor Sixth            |  Ab
  6      |  Major Sixth            |  A
 #6      |  Sharp Sixth            |  A#
bb7      |  Diminished Seventh     |  A
 b7      |  Minor Seventh          |  Bb
  7      |  Major Seventh          |  B
  8      |  Unison (Octave higher) |  C
 b9      |  Minor Ninth            |  Db
  9      |  Major Ninth            |  D
 #9      |  Sharp Ninth            |  D#
------------------------------------------------
#7
i still dont get it. explain because i dont know anything
and how do they relate to scales
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#8
Quote by bandet232
i still dont get it. explain because i dont know anything
and how do they relate to scales

Explain what? Specific questions are needed again.

In terms of scale relationships, they just represent specific distances from the root, but you really need a specific question (repeated for emphasis).
#9
Quote by bandet232
i still dont get it. explain because i dont know anything
and how do they relate to scales

Use them to make scales and chords

major scale: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
major chord : 1 3 5

minor scale : 1 2 b3 4 5 6 7
minor chord : 1 b3 5

min blues scale : 1 #2 4 #4 5 #6

and so on
#10
Quote by bandet232
i still dont get it. explain because i dont know anything
and how do they relate to scales


I'll try it this way...

A minor or a major scale (other scales are pretty much modified versions of these) are made of a root, a second, a third, a fourth, a fifth, a sixth, and a seventh. So, in C major, C is the root, D is the second, E is the third, and so on. In a minor and a major key of the same root, you have the same root, the same second, the same fourth, and the same fifth. The third, sixth, and seventh, are natural (major) in the major scale, and flat (minor) in the minor scale. Make sense?
Last edited by Macabre_Turtle at Apr 27, 2008,
#11
Quote by Smurfreak
min blues scale : 1 #2 4 #4 5 #6

The minor blues scale is based off minor pentatonic (1 b3 4 5 b7), so this is actually incorrect. The minor blues scale would be notated as 1 b3 4 b5 5 b7.
#12
Quote by Smurfreak
Use them to make scales and chords

major scale: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
major chord : 1 3 5

minor scale : 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
minor chord : 1 b3 5

min blues scale : 1 #2 4 #4 5 #6

and so on


Fixed
#13
thank you Macabre_Turtle you explained it best
now how does that transfer to chords
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Last edited by bandet232 at Apr 27, 2008,
#14
Quote by bandet232
thank you Macabre_Turtle you explained it best
now how does that transfer to scales

Each note of a scale is referred to as a degree. In a major scale, for example, the degrees are 1 2 3 4 5 6 7, and in C major you have the notes C D E F G A B. C is the first degree (root) and so on. All you have to do is count numbers to find the intervals - for example, if you go from C G, you're going from 1 to 5 so it is a fifth. Just extend this basic concept until you have a mastery of it for now.

Quote by Macabre_Turtle
The third, sixth, and seventh, are sharp (major) in the major scale, and flat (minor) in the minor scale. Make sense?

I wouldn't describe it like this; to be more accurate would be to say that they're natural in the major scale and flattened in the minor scale.

Just saw your edit, though, bandet232. A major triad is built up of 1 3 5, so in C that's C E G. A minor triad contains 1 b3 5, so you'd have to flatten the E and it becomes C Eb G to be a C minor triad. This is the very base of the idea, so does this make sense for now?
#15
Unison, Major, perfect...basislly is saying the samething

Minor, diminish..is saying play that note flat. (1/2 pitch down)


Augment, sharp is saying play it sharp (1/2 pitch up)


All you have to watch out for it the 7th's term, diminish for the 7th = double flat

This clearify the difference between the Gmaj7 and a G7 chord.
The G7 has a minor 7th or a flat 7th
Last edited by Ordinary at Apr 27, 2008,
#16
Quote by Ordinary
Unison, Major, perfect...basislly is saying the samething

Minor, diminish..is saying play that note flat. (1/2 pitch down)


Augment, sharp is saying play it sharp (1/2 pitch up)


All you have to watch out for it the 7th's term, diminish for the 7th = double flat

This clearify the difference between the Gmaj7 and a G7 chord.
The G7 has a minor 7th

You shouldn't generalize like that. "Unison", "major" and "perfect" do not say the same thing.

Nor do "minor" and "diminished".
#17
why ?

Is it a sin if I say a major5th instead of a perfect5th ?....it's still the same pitch.
I guess I might burn in hell if i say natural 5.lol

or the saying 2 chord, instead of II chord

I guess C# and Db has different pitch too ?

or saying the 3 mode instead of saying phrygian ?..or is it Me.lol
#18
Quote by Ordinary
why ?

Is it a sin if I say a major5th instead of a perfect5th ?....it's still the same pitch.

or the saying 2 chord, instead of II chord

I guess C# and Db has different pitch too ?

or saying the 3 mode instead of saying phrygian ?..or is it Me.lol

Yes, it's a sin because a "major fifth" is not a correct term. A fifth can only be perfect, augmented or diminished. The term your using isn't right, sorry.

And in non equally-tempered music, C# and Db are different; once again, though, you've brought in examples that really aren't relevant.

And you'd have to say "third mode of the major scale" to accurate describe Phrygian in such a manner.
#19
thankyou every one i almost get it now if someone could write a paragragh on it or give me a link it would be much apprciated
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#20
Quote by bandet232
thankyou every one i almost get it now if someone could write a paragragh on it or give me a link it would be much apprciated

Theory sticky at the top of this forum.
#21
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#23
well da be ya be doo..

it's common knowlege...that the 7th chord is a minb5...

or is it a diminish ?

so what's the correct term..incase I go to hell ? lol

dose that have any commonsence to ya ?
#24
Quote by Ordinary
well da be ya be doo..

it's common knowlege...that the 7th chord is a minb5...

or is it a diminish ?

so what's the correct term..incase I go to hell ? lol

dose that have any commonsence to ya ?

Nope, that makes no sense, least of all that first line.

And the m7b5 chord is not diminished, it's half-diminished.
#25
Quote by :-D

I wouldn't describe it like this; to be more accurate would be to say that they're natural in the major scale and flattened in the minor scale.


My bad. I fixed it.
#27
Quote by bandet232
thank you Macabre_Turtle you explained it best
now how does that transfer to chords


A chords name is determined by which of these intervals are used

Quote by bandet232


A triad uses a Root, a third, and a fifth. They can be...
Major - R, major third, perfect fifth
Augmented - R, major third, augmented fifth
Minor - R, minor third, perfect fifth
Diminished - R, minor third, diminished fifth
#28
hey..no sweat off my back..I still know what you're saying when you say
natural. If you say unison..I'll know it's been narrowed to the root.
if you say perfect, I know it's narrow to the 4th and 5th.

I won't comdem u to hell.
#29
Quote by Ordinary
hey..no sweat off my back..I still know what you're saying when you say
natural. If you say unison..I'll know it's been narrowed to the root.
if you say perfect, I know it's narrow to the 4th and 5th.

I won't comdem u to hell.

"Perfect" is also used to describe unisons and octaves, though less often. And a unison isn't just on the root, it can be any degree of a scale.
#30
okay..smiley you right...

send me a self address envelope, and i'll sent you a certified perfect pick.lol