#1
hey, i am looking to replace my Edge III, with an Edge pro. I am willing to route it out, and i would really appreciate it if someone could give me some measurements, so i could make sure the studs will be correct, and how long and wide it is. Thanks
Gear:

Ibanez RGT42DX
Boss MT-2
#3
I have your same question....I have a JS100 with a edge III (i think...cos i dont know which year my guitar is, and earlier versions had the II) and it is kinda "broken" so i NEED the edge pro.
#4
Why not a OFR. I did it myself. No route was necessary, but i did have to sand one side a milimeter, but the finish looks good since the sanding is hiddeng by the bridge.
#5
Quote by nyandres
Why not a OFR. I did it myself. No route was necessary, but i did have to sand one side a milimeter, but the finish looks good since the sanding is hiddeng by the bridge.


How does that costed to you?, also, which guitar do you have? It would be useful for both me and the thread starter..thanks !
#6
An OFR is supposedly a drop in exchange for an Edge III. It'll cost you up to $200 for the trem depending on the color you want, hehe.

An Edge Pro is likely going to cost you more anyway.

www.warmoth.com
Last edited by ketiov at Apr 28, 2008,
#7
Well the sanding was a bitch. It took me like 4 hours of pure sanding, but then again i wanted it to look perfect. It lookes as if the OFR was done at the factory. The OFR cost me 200 dollars, the sandpaper 10 bucks. I got a really rough one. If you dont do the sanding the ofr will be tight, and the pull up may crack the paint. If you do sand it, it will work like a dream. Mine works like a dream. By the way other than the sanding everything else is really easy.
#8
Quote by nyandres
Well the sanding was a bitch. It took me like 4 hours of pure sanding, but then again i wanted it to look perfect. It lookes as if the OFR was done at the factory. The OFR cost me 200 dollars, the sandpaper 10 bucks. I got a really rough one. If you dont do the sanding the ofr will be tight, and the pull up may crack the paint. If you do sand it, it will work like a dream. Mine works like a dream. By the way other than the sanding everything else is really easy.


I dont really understand the "sanding" concept, english is my second language, but then is not really hard to change it? and is actually the original floyd rose better than edge III ??? thanks in advance!
#9
Quote by RFer
I dont really understand the "sanding" concept, english is my second language, but then is not really hard to change it? and is actually the original floyd rose better than edge III ??? thanks in advance!

Do you know what sand paper is? It is the paper with a very rough surface usually rubbed on wood to make it smooth. He is saying the original Floyd Rose is a little bit bigger than the hole in the wood for the Edge III, and it needs to be made smaller by sanding the edges.

The Edge III is considered to be a horrible tremolo system. The original Floyd Rose is the original (whoa) and is superior by far to the Edge III.
#10
Well im gonna explain it clearly

Here is the guitar. THis is an rgt42dx. In my opinion the best woodwork ibanez has to offer, and the only weakness the pickups, and edge III (which i dont think its all that bad).






Well as you can see in the second picture there is space on all the sides around the floyd rose. Well, before the amount of space was too little on one side, which is the side im pointing to. I had to use a 100 sand paper to sandout the wood on that side to have enough space, and a finer sand paper to smoothen the surface. If you dont leave enough space around the floyd a pull using the whammy bar may cause the floyd to hit the wood around it, cracking the finish.

In other words, sand out enough wood if you guitar fits the floyd rose too tight. Trust me... there should be at least 2.5 millimeters of space all around the floyd. So when you install it, try it out, and if you see the floyd hitting the wood on a dive or pull, take it back out and with sand paper get rid of the extra wood. There are faster ways to do it, but the sand paper will make it look smooth and professional.

The other thing to keep in mind is you will have to modify the back plate cover too. Well you dont have to, but it will give you more range for dives and pulls. The floyd rose has a bigger sustain bar, (the metal block where the springs attach to). This means that when you pull, the sustain bar will hit the back cover. So I made a hole on the back cover, as you can see in the two upcoming images.

This one shows why modifying the cover is necessary. That hole is the modification.


And here is a top view of it


Its all really really really easy, but a lot of work. It took me like 15 hours to do it. It can be done quicker but it wont look as good if you don't work with quality. As you can see in the pictures, it looks as if done at the factory. I love my guitar, so I to all the measures to keep it safe.

One last thing, but im too lazy to open the back plate, to show you a pick is the other modification. When you do a dive, the bigger sustain block will again give problems. The modification for the back plate was for pulls, this one is for dives. It will give you a lot more range for dives. This modification is to sand the wood stopping the sustain block when you do a dive.


Once all the sanding is done just paint over the wood. Makes sure you never sand the top of the guitar. That will not look good. Only sand on the whole.
Last edited by nyandres at Apr 30, 2008,