#1
Well, I'm doing an essay for history on Christianity's effect on Rome, (Grade 10, Canada) I have read quite a bit of information, but I don't know which way I should steer the paper; did Christianity have a positive or negitive effect on the Roman Empire? It sort of contributed to the downfall, but more just kind of "pre-occupided" them.
Any other suggestions to "steer" the paper in would also be helpful.

Thanks


PS. It said the religion thread was closed but correct me if I'm wrong.
#4
It paved the way for the social/economic systems of Medieval Europe.
''Technological advancements are like an axe in the hands of a pathological criminal.'' - Albert Einstein
#6
People became more devoted to Christianity than their Roman government (Christianity promised hope for everybody, including the poor).

I had to do something like this a few months ago. And I'm in gr.8 >=O
#7
It goes both ways.

In a way it was good, if your a christian as it was evangelism to the enth degree, and with the conversion of Constantine in i think 378 many people in the roman empire became converts to the religion. It also led to christianity being the sole religion of the worlds largest empire, and if not for it then we would not be having this discussion here today. Christianity would have died like all the other random sects at the time if not for it.

On the other hand, the resulting phenomenon (sp?) called Constantinianism is simply a horrible association as it leads to a symbiotic relationship between church and state, which gives secular powers way too much authority over spiritual matters. This leads to many problems including nationalism of the 1500's and the crusades in the 11th Century.

Yeah I go to a christian highschool, and I had to write an essay on this about a month ago. Personally, I said it was a bit of both, and failed to directly take a side.

Hope that helps, and if you need more help on this I can give you more info!
#8
Yeah, we are studying the first few centuries CE (AD), until about the fall of the Roman Empire (410?) so very early Christianity. My knowledge of the subject is limited... so sorry if I am unclear.
#9
Quote by rickyy
It paved the way for the social/economic systems of Medieval Europe.


ahahaha.

corruption to be short.

it put a spilt in, and eventually brought down, the empire. go check out byzantium.
#10
Quote by hawk5211
It goes both ways.

In a way it was good, if your a christian as it was evangelism to the enth degree, and with the conversion of Constantine in i think 378 many people in the roman empire became converts to the religion. It also led to christianity being the sole religion of the worlds largest empire, and if not for it then we would not be having this discussion here today. Christianity would have died like all the other random sects at the time if not for it.

On the other hand, the resulting phenomenon (sp?) called Constantinianism is simply a horrible association as it leads to a symbiotic relationship between church and state, which gives secular powers way too much authority over spiritual matters. This leads to many problems including nationalism of the 1500's and the crusades in the 11th Century.

Yeah I go to a christian highschool, and I had to write an essay on this about a month ago. Personally, I said it was a bit of both, and failed to directly take a side.

Hope that helps, and if you need more help on this I can give you more info!


So bad and worse.
#11
It was bad, the edict of milan was issued in 312, only 150ish years later the Roman Empire fell. It was re-erected again in later as the Holy Roman Empire.
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#12
Quote by *NappyJ*
So bad and worse.


well no actually, from a christian perspective its good actually, but if you chose to be black and white about it you could come to that.

Either way, without it there would be no established christianity, or any of the institutes founded on its teachings, like ohh say, the United states of America.

Just chucking that out there.
#13
Thanks Hawk, that helps... as long as I'm convincing it should go well... I'll probably lean it towards negitive, just because the empire fell so shortly after.

Edit: Ahh, just read your last message, now I almost wanna go the other way... thanks though.
Last edited by mulletboy14 at Apr 27, 2008,
#14
Quote by hawk5211
well no actually, from a christian perspective its good actually, but if you chose to be black and white about it you could come to that.

Either way, without it there would be no established christianity, or any of the institutes founded on its teachings, like ohh say, the United states of America.

Just chucking that out there.

so bad, too worse, too terrible?

the fanatically christian colonists from Europe killed off pretty much all the indigenous people in america. the worst, most amoral criminals from europe made helped and worked with the indigenous people in australia. so much though that they're still living pretty similar to the way they did then, now, and in large groups.

says something doesn't it.
#15
Quote by hawk5211
well no actually, from a christian perspective its good actually, but if you chose to be black and white about it you could come to that.

Either way, without it there would be no established christianity, or any of the institutes founded on its teachings, like ohh say, the United states of America.

Just chucking that out there.


No. A country would have been founded here sooner or later. And even then the USA was only made up of Christian people, the American Revolution was inspired mainly by Enlightenment philosophy and English tyranny. Not to mention the Founding Fathers were mostly Deists.

"I do not find in orthodox Christianity one redeeming feature." Thomas Jefferson
#16
Quote by mulletboy14
Thanks Hawk, that helps... as long as I'm convincing it should go well... I'll probably lean it towards negitive, just because the empire fell so shortly after.

Edit: Ahh, just read your last message, now I almost wanna go the other way... thanks though.


lol thats the sad part of it. Its a hard subject to pick a side on.

My teacher for the subject has his Ph.D in theology, and his opinion is that it was the worst thing ever, for the christian religion, ambivilant to the romans prespective, which is what your wanting.
#17
^ Yeah, it would have effected the Roman Empire negitively.
But in "the end", (which I don't have to talk about) it helped/hurt many other civilizations.
Thanks for all the help guys.
#18
Christianity did have a negative effect on the empire. As emperors alternated between christian and pagan, there were various purges, destruction of temples, etc. in the cases of less moderate emperors. It had other negative effects. But there were many other far more significant factors at work in the fall of (western) Rome. If anything, the effect on the eastern provinces was positive. Thanks to christianity, it took almost another thousand years for the empire to crumble away - the orthodox church went a long way towards holding the court at Constantinople together. Try to look beyond the typical view of christianity's effect on rome as negative, and view its effects in the light of the great number of similar cults that sprang up throughout the eastern provinces within the same couple of centuries (The cults of Mithras and Sol Invictus are good examples, but there were many more), and the effects on the empire as a whole, not just the western power center. And remember, the city of Rome may have fallen in 476, but the Empire actually remained until 1453, as the so called 'Byzantine' empire was in fact the roman empire - even if it was completely different.
#19
Thanks Mad Bob and Hawk, those have helped me.
I have next-to no knowledge of Rome/Byzantine after about the 4th century CE, but I think I understand what you are saying.