#1
i didn't know which forum to put this in... this one kinda seemed to fit

i'm 16 years old and i want to give basic guitar lessons to make some money... it will basically be for people who have never picked up a guitar before... my question is what age group i should start at? what equipment should i provide and ask them to provide? Should i start them on an acoustic? and... how experienced should i be to be able to give beginning guitar lessons? any advice on this business venture is much appreciated.
#2
16 is when i started, and you generally give lessons to people younger than you who really havn't played that much before. They should be able to provide their own stuff, or atleast thats what i told my kids. I have a kids i teach who are 7, 10, and 13. Just teach them some basic stuff, chords, fretboard stuff, scales, and some simple songs.

And the best thing i've found to help teaching kids is teach them a song first, like "back in black" good starting song. Teach them the song without saying a word about chords, but just say your fingers go here, and then once they get the song down, you go back and say, now look this thing you've been playing is an A major chord, and they understand it b/c they already know it.

that might work might not, just a little something i've picked up from my kids i teach.
#3
It would be great if you knew your music theory well enough to answer some questions they may have, maybe even know some sheet music. Always get a lot of info on what types of music and bands they're into, so you can start them on an easy song they like. Perhaps even have a basic guitar book you can bring along (or they can buy) so they can study when you're not teaching. Good luck!

Edit: It's also important not to overwhelm them with information. Like the guy above me said, just give it to them then teach. Seeing eye-to-eye is kinda the toughest thing to do.
#4
wow, im glad you posted this, cause im going through the same thing man,
#6
Im wondering the same thing, i have a quick question if you'll allow me to hijack this real quick, ive been playing for about 9/10 months now, i was thinking about giving some very basic lessons for some money, which i really need, I can sweep, i know scales, some arpeggios, play everything from blues to black metal, and i was wondering if i should, or if i should wait a while.

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

#7
Quote by valennic
Im wondering the same thing, i have a quick question if you'll allow me to hijack this real quick, ive been playing for about 9/10 months now, i was thinking about giving some very basic lessons for some money, which i really need, I can sweep, i know scales, some arpeggios, play everything from blues to black metal, and i was wondering if i should, or if i should wait a while.


Whether or not you can sweep is not important. Do you know what you're sweeping? Do you know the notes? Not to slap you down, but it's important to be able to explain things to the student. If you have the accuracy, know the notes, have the patience, and can explain it, go for it!
#8
Quote by valennic
Im wondering the same thing, i have a quick question if you'll allow me to hijack this real quick, ive been playing for about 9/10 months now, i was thinking about giving some very basic lessons for some money, which i really need, I can sweep, i know scales, some arpeggios, play everything from blues to black metal, and i was wondering if i should, or if i should wait a while.


wait man, at least for a couple of years, and seriously, if at all possible, take a course on music theory, and learn your stuff, then give lessons, that way you know exactly what your talkin about
#9
Ok, thank you. I guess ill wait a while before i start. Thanks for the help

oh and btw, i do know what im sweeping.

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

#10
Yeah, don't over whelm them with informations.
And don't throw outageous terms or therory at them.

I know it should be a Dmin7..when he saids D chord.
Him being able identify it as a D chord is plenty at the moment.

The trick is to be able to translate the theory to how they can comprehend it and
use it.

Teach them a couple of songs that they want to play...not what you want.
So they will stay interest. Don't make it harder or complicated for them.

I'm teaching my nephew to play at the moment.
Already, he understands basic chord make up...becuase it's just every other notes.lol
He knows all of the natural notes from the nut to 5th frets...obviously he know the
name of the strings too.

Instead of playing random exercise to develope his finger's strenght.
I went over the notes with him and had him call it out as he's playing it.
Havn't got him to humm the scales as he plays...yet of course.

He knows where the 1/2 steps are at. He also knows it's between the E/F and B/C.
He also memorizes the first Amin pentatonic too.

For some reasons he wanted to learned Dust in the wind.
He's learnding PMI and can play most of the songs already.
That's his goal and it's my job to help him achive that goal


It's only been a week.
I havn't throw 2,4,6 as minors at him yet.
Maybe I'll teach him to tune next week.
#11
You strum 3 bars of E student picks the E string on bar 4 , then do the same with The A chord ,
if you are in tune you will be in key and making music together
Damien Redmond - "Grade 8 electric guitar" -"Grade 5 theory "
"Licentiate Diploma of the London college of music "
#12
Quote by 06CardsChamps
what age group i should start at?...and... how experienced should i be to be able to give beginning guitar lessons?


You need to be of an age yourself and a level of playing where your students will take you seriously. At 16, that probably does mean people in the 8-13/14 range. I've never accepted students under the age of 8. Generally speaking, the muscles and bone structures in the hand aren't really developed enough to play guitar yet. Nobody who is 25 will take lessons from a 16 year old guitar teacher. In any case, students will want to know the capabilities of their instructor. You either need to impress them with your experiences and credentials and reputation, or at least to impress them with your playing.

Quote by 06CardsChamps

what equipment should i provide and ask them to provide?


They provide guitar, strings, and a duotang or binder to keep stuff in, and any recordings they might want for reference. You provide your own guitar, etc., maybe staff paper, chord charts, song handouts, and a tuner and metronome for use at your studio. Yes... your studio. You need a proper environment to teach in. Don't take them to your bedroom with your Trivium posters. Know-wad-eye-meen?

Quote by 06CardsChamps

Should i start them on an acoustic?


Start them on whatever they have. If they don't yet have a guitar, I recommend starting on classical. The strings are pliable enough that they don't hurt your fingers too badly, but will allow them to toughen up for steel strings later, whether those steel strings be on an acoustic or an electric guitar. Also, a classical guitar has the strings a bit further apart, which makes it a little more forgiving of sloppy hand position in the beginning. Also the frets are a bit wider, which though it makes it harder to reach, when they go to electric or acoustic, it will be like learning to walk with ski boots on, and then taking them off. You can sure fly!

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#13
Quote by axemanchris
You need to be of an age yourself and a level of playing where your students will take you seriously. At 16, that probably does mean people in the 8-13/14 range. I've never accepted students under the age of 8. Generally speaking, the muscles and bone structures in the hand aren't really developed enough to play guitar yet. Nobody who is 25 will take lessons from a 16 year old guitar teacher. In any case, students will want to know the capabilities of their instructor. You either need to impress them with your experiences and credentials and reputation, or at least to impress them with your playing.


They provide guitar, strings, and a duotang or binder to keep stuff in, and any recordings they might want for reference. You provide your own guitar, etc., maybe staff paper, chord charts, song handouts, and a tuner and metronome for use at your studio. Yes... your studio. You need a proper environment to teach in. Don't take them to your bedroom with your Trivium posters. Know-wad-eye-meen?


Start them on whatever they have. If they don't yet have a guitar, I recommend starting on classical. The strings are pliable enough that they don't hurt your fingers too badly, but will allow them to toughen up for steel strings later, whether those steel strings be on an acoustic or an electric guitar. Also, a classical guitar has the strings a bit further apart, which makes it a little more forgiving of sloppy hand position in the beginning. Also the frets are a bit wider, which though it makes it harder to reach, when they go to electric or acoustic, it will be like learning to walk with ski boots on, and then taking them off. You can sure fly!

CT


axeman, two thumbs up for all the helpful info
#14
my pleasure....

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.