#1
so...im not a very good piano player but im learning Let It Be, and theres a C/e chord...I know how slashchords work on guitar and stuff like that, and im trying to figure it out with the E as the bass note, but it doesnt sound right...if you guys saw a C/e on a piano music sheet, how would it be fingered?
#5
It's an inversion isn't it? So you could play it E G C with E being the lowest note played.
#6
Quote by st.stephen
It's an inversion isn't it? So you could play it E G C with E being the lowest note played.

It's not an inversion, it's a slash chord, meaning the chord stays the same but there's a note other than the root in the bass.
#7
Quote by :-D
It's not an inversion, it's a slash chord, meaning the chord stays the same but there's a note other than the root in the bass.

You're probably right, but you can notate inversions as slash chords also. It really depends upon where he found the tab. From here, you're probably right it's E C E G because most people on here I know read C/E as E C E G.
#8
Here guys, I play this song on piano all the time, heres how the chords are built.

Your right hand is playing the first inversion of the chord, your left hand is playing the tonic pitch down an octave. Easy as pie.

For instance, the first chord, is voice with just a C note on your left hand, and then E G C on your right. Same for all the other chords in the song, even the minor ones.