#1
OK so if you've come across my threads before then you might remember me saying about a hearing problem I have.


Well now I am having trouble bass wise- I often find myself not being able to hear the basslines on recordings, miss the drumbeats in band practice and I can't hear myself playing, especially if it's my E or A strings.

I can't play by ear for the same reason and seen as I'm in worship band I can't just learn every song we need to know because there are far too many (over 700 that i know about) so muscle memory is no good.

Any suggestions as to what I can do technique and playing-wise to help myself?


PS I use earplugs now....
#3
Quote by Martindecorum
well i have a cool idea but u would need a mixing desk thats connected to acomp
with some sort of recording software do u have these



I can get access to some stuff yeah.......go on
#4
ok also u need to find out what frequencies u cant hear at which is simple with a hearing test

ok i was thinking if at band practice u mic up everyone in the room, and run them to the computer. turn on the monitor and u plug in some head phones so u can hear everything that is going on as a live feed


now on the tracks that are there, give each of them an EQ setting say for example the kick drum is focused around 350-450hertz, and ur hearing loss is in that area causing u not to hear it, EQ that track with a higher hertz level 500-600 hertz causes this to bypass ur hearing loss and u will be able to hear it

Now this could be time consuming the first time this is set up, but after each set up save the preset so u can get in to it straight away
#7
How about using a signal splitter, and sending one output to an octave up effect then a headphone amp?
#8
Quote by Martindecorum
ok also u need to find out what frequencies u cant hear at which is simple with a hearing test


I think you should go see your doctor. Your reduction in hearing is causing you less enjoyment of something which you love, i.e. a reduction in quality of life. Do not feel like you shouldn't go.

There's always the option of in-ear monitors.

Also, there have been exciting studies recently using stem cells to regenerate hair cells in the inner ear. If it works out, and you can hold out another 10 years or so, you'll have another fix.
#9
Quote by Withakay
Oh man, I feel for you. This must be terrible.

MartinDecorum, your idea is not bad. But couldn't you just do this with an in-ear monitor hooked-up to an equalizer?

Here is some info I found:
http://www.westone.com/content/254.html
http://www.sensaphonics.com/
http://www.prosoundweb.com/install/church_talk/iem.php

Hope this helps...



Can you run a set of in-ear monitors from a PA? It's just that at church where I play all the instruments are ran through a huge PA which runs all the audio and visuals from the service.

Also, I play using a seperate bass stack. How would I connect to the system??
#10
yeah u should be able to run an in ear monitor from the PA there is bound to be somewhere
thats states an output,

Also with the bass stack, from the line out of the bass plug it into the PA so it all is coming through the PA
#11
Quote by Fassa Albrecht
Can you run a set of in-ear monitors from a PA?
I don't know the details really, but I'm sure you can jack it into any sound system.
Also, I play using a seperate bass stack. How would I connect to the system??
Maybe you can use a standard microphone as input and equalize that?

Apparently these systems are quite expensive, so if I were you I'd go to a music store and ask for professional advice. I'd hate to make you buy the wrong equipment. This is just an idea, based on what MartinDecorum suggested.
#13
Quote by smb
How about using a signal splitter, and sending one output to an octave up effect then a headphone amp?

My thoughts exactly, You could do both with a Zoom pedal or similar and one of those junction things you can buy in guitar shops for like, £1 or something.
#14
Because increasing it by an octave still may have notes that are in his deaf spots there for still resulting in this problem

For example he may be able to hear to hear the frequency of C1 (261) but creating an octave of it (523) may go back within his deafness

At least with a EQ program, he can Increase the frequency so much that he can place them within his hearing threshhold
#15
Quote by Martindecorum
Because increasing it by an octave still may have notes that are in his deaf spots there for still resulting in this problem

He's a she. And she said it's mainly the E and A strings, therefore the lower octave. It's a simple and quick fix. For better advice she should see a doctor.
#16
well sorry didnt actually explore her sex, lol

yeah but we are also trying to get her able to hear the drum kit and bass

as she cant hear the kick
Last edited by Martindecorum at Apr 28, 2008,
#18
Quote by Fassa Albrecht
I'm also a drummer and can't hear my bass drum when I'm PLAYING,
Just a question, Miss Albrecht, don't you hear it at all? Does it even matter to raise the volume of certain frequencies?

Here's another idea: you could place a frequency monitor in front of you. (I doubt that's the correct term, but I mean the display with the dancing color bands on some Hi-fi equipment). Even though you can't hear certain frequencies, you'd be able to see when the bass drum hits and you'll be able to see what you play.

A third trick is to sit right in front of your bass speaker. You'll feel the vibrations in your lungs ans stomach when you play. Then again, maybe these vibrations will make your guitar resonate. And it won't work for your bass drum.
#19
Quote by Withakay
Just a question, Miss Albrecht, don't you hear it at all? Does it even matter to raise the volume of certain frequencies?

Here's another idea: you could place a frequency monitor in front of you. (I doubt that's the correct term, but I mean the display with the dancing color bands on some Hi-fi equipment). Even though you can't hear certain frequencies, you'd be able to see when the bass drum hits and you'll be able to see what you play.

A third trick is to sit right in front of your bass speaker. You'll feel the vibrations in your lungs ans stomach when you play. Then again, maybe these vibrations will make your guitar resonate. And it won't work for your bass drum.



Unfortunately space and time restrict me in what I can do equipment-wise. I have just 15 minutes to set-up each band practice and so if I have masses of computer equipment and pieces of technology to set up and get running not only will it cut into set-up time it also increases the amount of things that could potentially. We also have a small stage and I have probably 4 1/2 square feet to myself.

As for moving closer to the speaker, I can't move any closer as I get terrible migraines from the sound otherwise. I only discovered this when I did my first gig. Bear in mind I'm playing a 500w stack.
#20
Quote by Withakay
Here's another idea: you could place a frequency monitor in front of you. (I doubt that's the correct term, but I mean the display with the dancing color bands on some Hi-fi equipment). Even though you can't hear certain frequencies, you'd be able to see when the bass drum hits and you'll be able to see what you play.


do you mean an oscilloscope?
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I'm not sure why, though.

Me too!
We should start a support group.
#21
Bear in mind I'm playing a 500w stack.


I believe we may have found the root cause of the hearing loss in those frequencies. :P

But definitely see a doctor-there's not much which even the most complex technology is likely to be able to do if it keeps getting worse, which it *will* if the level at the moment caused the harm.
It might just be me, as well, but I don't think boosting the notes an octave is really a good idea, it'll sound different to how it's sounding to the people listening to it, and I've yet to hear a pitch shifter that can make notes sound like a bass an octave or whatever up-they tend to sound a bit odd.
#22
Quote by Samzawadi
I believe we may have found the root cause of the hearing loss in those frequencies. :P

But definitely see a doctor-there's not much which even the most complex technology is likely to be able to do if it keeps getting worse, which it *will* if the level at the moment caused the harm.
It might just be me, as well, but I don't think boosting the notes an octave is really a good idea, it'll sound different to how it's sounding to the people listening to it, and I've yet to hear a pitch shifter that can make notes sound like a bass an octave or whatever up-they tend to sound a bit odd.



If the stack is the problem then why have 4 other bassists used the stack without issue on a regular basis?
#23
You can get these things that you stand on whilst playing and they vibrate your signal (cant remember the name )underneath you effectively letting you feel the music instead of hearing it. Similar to the movie "its all gone Pete Tong" when he straps flip-flops onto 2 great big speaker cabinets to feel the music.
#24
Quote by kaptink
You can get these things that you stand on whilst playing and they vibrate your signal (cant remember the name )underneath you effectively letting you feel the music instead of hearing it. Similar to the movie "its all gone Pete Tong" when he straps flip-flops onto 2 great big speaker cabinets to feel the music.



I'm convinced I've seen those before..........I might see if I can find one.....
#25
Quote by Fassa Albrecht
If the stack is the problem then why have 4 other bassists used the stack without issue on a regular basis?


I was being mildly sarcastic, but hearing loss is a very individual thing. I worked for an ENT specialist for a few months last summer, and got to see the different range of hearing loss-and very often the same level of noise (in a factory or whatever) caused very different harm. I doubt it's *just* the stack, but 500w is pretty damn big and potentially harmful.

Earplugs are your friends when working at high volumes.
#27
Quote by frusciante.ve
you should really go to the doctor.



Already been...they couldn't find any issue, and the doctor didn't really understand about a lot of the music issues I've had
#28
Quote by Fassa Albrecht
Already been...they couldn't find any issue, and the doctor didn't really understand about a lot of the music issues I've had



what a dumb doctor to be honest, they should give u a SIMPLE hearing test which EVERY doctor should be able to give u. and this should diagnose what hearing loss u have
#29
You need to see an audiologist and not a GP for this.

A very good friend of mine is a guitarist who has severe hearing loss from playing in clubs for over 30 years. He has tinnitus and his audiologist has been working wonders with a treatment program. He is now able to play with in ear monitors and has seen some significant improvement.

Its vital you get to a good audiologist as soon as you can to get treatment and avoid additional loss.
#30
^ I totally agree.

I even think you should have a general hearing aid. It seems you are missing quite a part of the spectrum. This could be dangerous, in traffic for instance. Maybe your health insurance covers that?
Quote by bass dude nick
do you mean an oscilloscope?
No, nothing that sophisticated. Just the little bar display on a common hifi rack. The MP3 tool in the UG profile shows a fake one. I mean the dancing yellow bars. I really don't know what they're called.
#31
Quote by Withakay
^ I totally agree.

I even think you should have a general hearing aid. It seems you are missing quite a part of the spectrum. This could be dangerous, in traffic for instance. Maybe your health insurance covers that?
No, nothing that sophisticated. Just the little bar display on a common hifi rack. The MP3 tool in the UG profile shows a fake one. I mean the dancing yellow bars. I really don't know what they're called.



I might be able to have some sort of treatment through my university if I ask the student health people....

As for the display thing, I'm going to pay a visit to this PA and audio equipment shop near me and see whether they have any idea what piece of equipment I'lll need.
#33
i dont know if this is going to be possible but how about drums that light up when you hit them?

im sure you could link up a drum trigger to a light if you wanted.

so maybe then you'll be able to see and feel the bass drum instead of hearing it.

xx
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#34
Quote by shinhoman
i dont know if this is going to be possible but how about drums that light up when you hit them?

im sure you could link up a drum trigger to a light if you wanted.

so maybe then you'll be able to see and feel the bass drum instead of hearing it.

xx



That has to be the best answer yet! It'd also look pretty damned cool on stage!