#1
what is a dominant seventh chord such as A7, B7 or E7 etc?
apparently its not the same as Amaj7,Bmaj& or Emaj 7 like i thought it was

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#2
Amaj7 576655

A7 575655
Proud member of r0k 4 Chr15t club, PM T3hRav3n/christianbassis to join.

The Rig:
Dean Icon
Cimar strat-copy
Ibanez GRX-40
Dean Edge-1 Bass
Digitech RpX400
Peavey Rage 158


Creater of Tuba players united, pm to join.
#3
It's a 7th chord built from the 5th note of a key.
Call me Batman.
#4
it contains the mixolydian 7th instead of the major scale seventh degree, thus the less positive ring to it.
#7
Or to simplify that post:

A dominant 7th chord is a major triad with a minor 7th. It is primarily used on the fifth chord in rhythm, because it leads well into the tonic chord.

A M7 is a major triad with a major 7th, different stuff.
To be the last one
who will sing you to sleep...



christie.FRONT.drive
#8
Quote by CMJPEC
Or to simplify that post:

A dominant 7th chord is a major triad with a minor 7th. It is primarily used on the fifth chord in rhythm, because it leads well into the tonic chord.

A M7 is a major triad with a major 7th, different stuff.


Or to simply even more.

A dominant 7th is a b7th.
#9
Quote by zeppelinfreak51
Or to simply even more.

A dominant 7th is a b7th.

well no, because that isn't true.

In chord/scale terms "dominant" means a major 3rd and a minor 7th. Anything else can go, but those 2 things must be true for something to be dominant.
#11
thanks guys

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#17
Quote by ouchies
Really? I was taught that I could leave the root out if it clashes with the band. And alas, sometimes that has been the case and I omit the root and it sounds less cluttered.
It depends on what else is going on. If another guitar/bass or piano is playing the root, then it's fine to leave out. I would consider a rootless, fifthless chord to just be a tritone, but in the context of the rest of the band, that may be exactly what you want.

Satch does with with a Cm6 chord in "Cool #9." The guitar plays the b3 and 6 tritone while the bass plays the root. The effect is cool.