#1
So i've got another problem with music theory. Are chords based of off the scale thats the root note of the chord or are they based on the scale that you're using them in, Say I wanted to play a C Chord (EADGBe 032010) in the key of E....would I have to change anything about the chord? And say i use power chords but the fifth isn't in key, can i still use the pwr chord?
#3
Power chords are an exception. As long as the root note's in the scale, it fits.
#4
Quote by pwrmax
Power chords are an exception. As long as the root note's in the scale, it fits.
Nope. The fifth is important, though it often sounds fine to play an F#5 chord in the key of Em.
#5
The name of the chord depends on it's own scale. And a powerchord will sound fine if the fifth is out of key.
#6
So would i have to change a B chord if I were to play something in the key of E
#7
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
The name of the chord depends on it's own scale. And a powerchord will sound fine if the fifth is out of key.
Please elaborate.

Quote by mattj2192
So would i have to change a B chord if I were to play something in the key of E
No. B fits in the key of E. Do you mean Em?
#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote


No. B fits in the key of E. Do you mean Em?



Yeaaa my bad
#10
Is there any full explanations, lessons or such things anywhere on the internet that could help me out with selecting chords for keys and embellishing them to fit in that key?
#11
Quote by mattj2192
Is there any full explanations, lessons or such things anywhere on the internet that could help me out with selecting chords for keys and embellishing them to fit in that key?
As always, the theory link in my sig is a good place to look.
#12
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Please elaborate.


It means that a B chord is simply the root (B), it's major third (D#), and it's fifth (F#). The naming has nothing to do with the key that you are playing in.
#13
Quote by mattj2192
So i've got another problem with music theory. Are chords based of off the scale thats the root note of the chord or are they based on the scale that you're using them in, Say I wanted to play a C Chord (EADGBe 032010) in the key of E....would I have to change anything about the chord? And say i use power chords but the fifth isn't in key, can i still use the pwr chord?



the key of Emaj has a C# thers is no C in that key

second the Csharp is the 6th degree of the scale and that sixth degree is a minor chords to stay in key with a major key

so you would have to play C# minor to stay in key

general rule for staying in major key

1MAJ 2min 3min 4MAJ 5MAJ 6min 7diminished
song stuck in my head today


#15
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
It means that a B chord is simply the root (B), it's major third (D#), and it's fifth (F#). The naming has nothing to do with the key that you are playing in.
Oh, that is true. You don't adjust the notes of a chord to fit the notes of the key.
#16
^ oo lol

well than no you wouldn't have to change anything about the C chord
song stuck in my head today


#18
Quote by mattj2192
If i were to do Cm I would base it one the Cm scale right?


Yes. Cm is always, C, Eb, G. No matter what key you're in.
#20
Well naturally chords that are in key(every note!) are the ones that sound "normal" and pretty. Feel free to experiment with altered tones or borrowed chords or whatever for different sounds. You'll pick up new ways to use them to change keys or throw a wrench in the listener's ear after a while.
#21
I think Cmin has b3...so I'd pick a scale at least with a b3 in it, before
i yank on the wammi