#1
Say I played the A minor pent. scale from A (its most common position). When I moved it up, it would be in A# Minor pent.

e|------------------------------5
B|------------------------5--8--
G|-------------------5--7-------
D|--------------5--7------------
A|---------5--7-----------------
E|--5--8------------------------

e|------------------------------6--9
B|------------------------6--9------
G|-------------------6--8-----------
D|--------------6--8----------------
A|---------6--8---------------------
E|--6--9----------------------------


Does that mean if I played all 7 positions of the scales In A, then moved them all up a semitone, all the positions would be in A#? Sorry if this is confusing.
#2
Yep
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#3
Quote by slayer1516
Does that mean if I played all 7 positions of the scales In A, then moved them all up a semitone, all the positions would be in A#?
Yes.

Since you're describing it as "moving up the A scale," A# is the correct name. However, without any context, the scales will usually be called Bb.


This applies to any scale. F minor moved up a half step is F# minor. C Lydian moved up a half-step is C# Lydian etc...
#6
Quote by slayer1516
Thanks alot. This is great. I can learn my scales much quicker now.

Make sure you learn the scales and not just positions ("scales").
#7
Quote by :-D
Make sure you learn the scales and not just positions ("scales").


I know that, I understand scales and the theory behind them
#9
Quote by slayer1516
I know that, I understand scales and the theory behind them
Test:

If I play the following pattern over an A chord, what scale am I playing?


e-----------------------2-5----------------------------------------
B-------------------2-5--------------------------------------------
G--------------2-4-------------------------------------------------
D----------2-4-----------------------------------------------------
A------2-4---------------------------------------------------------
E-2-5--------------------------------------------------------------
#11
Quote by branny1982
F#minor pentatonic.
whats my prize?
I wanted Slayer to answer the question, and only Slayer.


So, Mr. Slayer, do you agree or disagree with Branny? And if you disagree, please propose a new scale.
#14
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I wanted Slayer to answer the question, and only Slayer.


So, Mr. Slayer, do you agree or disagree with Branny? And if you disagree, please propose a new scale.



now i am f'ed up not fed up ol


if A was the tonic how can you be playing an F# scale over it??

Edit i would say your playing Amajor 1 2 3 6 7
song stuck in my head today


Last edited by lbc_sublime at Apr 30, 2008,
#16
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Test:

If I play the following pattern over an A chord, what scale am I playing?


e-----------------------2-5----------------------------------------
B-------------------2-5--------------------------------------------
G--------------2-4-------------------------------------------------
D----------2-4-----------------------------------------------------
A------2-4---------------------------------------------------------
E-2-5--------------------------------------------------------------



Ofcourse if that A is part of an F#minor progression, the answer is different than if it was an A major progression, or just a static A chord. You might want to specify that, because you could be playing over an A chord and still be in F# minor.
#18
Quote by GuitarMunky
You might want to specify that, because you could be playing over an A chord and still be in F# minor.
Fair enough.

Assume it's just a static A chord.
#19
Quote by ouchies
First of all, you're wrong. Secondly, the question was not directed at you. Way to destroy a good lesson that was to be learned.


I gotta say, I hate ambush lessons, especially when they are not set up properly.

There is more than one answer based on how it was set up.
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Fair enough.

Assume it's just a static A chord.


thats cool.

or how about a progression:

A - F#m- Bm - E7

you might want to add the question: " where is the tonic in this scale pattern " if it is in the key of this chord progression: A - F#m- Bm - E7.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Apr 30, 2008,
#20
Quote by GuitarMunky
you might want to add the question: " where is the tonic in this scale pattern " if it is in the key of this chord progression: A - F#m- Bm - E7.
That's important to know as well, but it doesn't show that a scale doesn't depend on the position.

I'd consider that to be in A, but if you make E7 regular E, F#m works as well.
#22
Quote by bangoodcharlote
That's important to know as well, but it doesn't show that a scale doesn't depend on the position.

I'd consider that to be in A, but if you make E7 regular E, F#m works as well.


Na thats in A Major even without the Dominant 7.

Its a typical Major progression, I - vi - ii - V (regardless of having a 7th in V chord)


Quote by bangoodcharlote
, but it doesn't show that a scale doesn't depend on the position..


Yeah it does. thats exactly what it does show. You wouldnt be able to answer that question if you didnt understand the concept. Its just a more focused question with no loose ends.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Apr 30, 2008,
#23
Quote by GuitarMunky
it does. thats exactly what it does show. You wouldnt be able to answer that question if you didnt understand the concept. Its just a more focused question with no loose ends.
I misread what you wrote. You are correct.


I still say that A F#m Bm E can resolve to F#m.
#24
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I misread what you wrote. You are correct.


I still say that A F#m Bm E can resolve to F#m.


it could.... thats whats called a deceptive cadence. V to vi instead of V I
keep in mind the key word there is "deceptive". In general the pattern would normally just start over.... on the I chord (A).

I listed it as a simple basic 4 bar progression for a reason, I specifically put the V7 so there would be no question, and the TS could learn the lesson you were trying to set up.
#25
Quote by ouchies
First of all, you're wrong. Secondly, the question was not directed at you. Way to destroy a good lesson that was to be learned.

please accept my apologies, but if there was a good lesson to be learned there i wouldn't have posted the answer LGC was fishing for.