#1
hi im luke and ive been playing guitar for about a year, but am very new to music theroy. i was wondering what kind of key signatures or sclaes you like to use in solos or improvising. my style is kind of bluesy, but i also have a huge liking for rock and metal. thanks for your contribution
#2
Blues and Blues/Rock is going to be based on the blues progression, I I I I IV IV I I V IV I V, likely all 7th chords. The typical scale used over this is the minor pentatonic or minor blues.

Metal is going to be based more on the Natural Minor, Phrygian, Harmonic Minor, and Phrygian Dominant scales, but learn the blues stuff first.

Anyw questions, please ask, but read the theory link in my sig.
#3
It all depends on the key of the song/track you're soloing over. Just solo in the corresponding key. I guess if you were going to do a blues solo, it would help to use the blues scale (1, 3, 4, b5, 5, 7). Once you start understanding chords and different harmonies, you can use modes, but if you're just getting into theory I'd advise staying away from those for now.
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#5
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Fixed. Those flats are important.

I don't think of it that way. I think of minor as it's own scale, not just flatting notes in the major scale. I seem to be the only one who thinks that way.
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#6
Quote by AbstractDeth7X
I seem to be the only one who thinks that way.
That's because you're wrong or explaining it in such a way that it appears you're wrong even though you're actually right.

Most any note works over a dom7 chord, but the nat7 is (generally) not one of them as your scale suggests.
#7
Quote by AbstractDeth7X
I don't think of it that way. I think of minor as it's own scale, not just flatting notes in the major scale. I seem to be the only one who thinks that way.

It's convention to refer to everything as it relates to the major scale.
#8
Quote by AbstractDeth7X
I don't think of it that way. I think of minor as it's own scale, not just flatting notes in the major scale. I seem to be the only one who thinks that way.



you can think that way but describing intervals that way doesn't really work you would need to use tones

you need 1 constant to describe something like that

if i were to describe ever diatonic scale like that there would be no difference between them respectfullly.

but we all kbnow there are
song stuck in my head today


#9
Quote by :-D
It's convention to refer to everything as it relates to the major scale.
Oh, I get it.

Mr. AbstractDeth7X, your line of thinking does not follow the standard conventions of musical communication. If you want to confuse your fellow musicians and not communicate with them, continue using that. If you want anyone to know what the hell you're talking about, learn the language of music.

Don't be a rebel or a badass. Learn music.