#1
So I am trying to memorize the fretboard, does anyone know a good way to memorize it? What I am doing right now it just looking at a poster I have with the notes and playing them while saying the note name. Is there a better way or is what I am doing good enough?
#2
Well there are only 12 notes on the guitar, but they simply repeat themselves. I'm in the same boat as you, but I'm trying to memorize the notes up to the 11th fret, because everything repeats itself at and after the 12th fret, only one octave higher.
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#3
just remember every fret is a half step. the major scale is whole whole half whole whole whole half.
#4
all I can say is good luck. I don't have the patience for that, I just memorize notes with time b playing them all the time.
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#5
lol, just play and you will remember
thats how i remember, i just played enough
just give me a fender and let me rip
#6
Noticing the patterns that are on the fretboard can really help.

Ever notice that the 5th fret on the E string is an A note, 5th on the A string is a D note, 5th on the D string is a G note? This pattern stops here because the 4th on the G string is a B note.

Similarly, the 7th fret A string is an E note, 7th on the D string is an A note, 7th on the G string is a D note. Again, the pattern changes here, the 6th fret on the B string is a G note and finally, the 7th fret E string is a B note.

Hope that helps.
#8
There's only 12 notes on the guitar, they just keep repeating...it's only difficult if you don't take the time to break it down.

1 - learn the open strings...E, A, D, G, B, E
2 - familiarise yourself with the pattern of notes along the low E string, you don't even need to learn it by heart yet, just have it for reference.

E F F# G G# A Bb B C D Eb E

3 - realise that the 12 fret is the octave of the open string, and therefore the same note.
4 - realise that the pattern of intervals is constant, so 12 th fret onwards is identical to open string onwards.

... as far as working out notes goes you are currently never more than 6 frets away from a reference note. However, counting along 6 frets is kind of clunky and not particularly easy, but it's a start.

5 - learn the notes that correspond to the next open string, so 5th fret on the E, A, D and B strings, 4th fret on the G

...all of a sudden you're never more than 3 frets way from a known reference note. All of a sudden working out the notes you don't know became a lot easier...almost twice as easy, in fact.

6 - locate the other octaves of the open notes, first the ones on the next string... 7th fret on the A, D, G and high E strings, 8th fret on the B string. Then the octaves two strings away so 2nd fret on the D and G strings, 3rd fret on the B and top E.

7 - in the same way, locate the octaves of the notes you learned in step 5

...all of a sudden you're now never more than 1 fret away from a known reference note, which basically means you know them all!
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#9
Quote by steven seagull
There's only 12 notes on the guitar, they just keep repeating...it's only difficult if you don't take the time to break it down.

1 - learn the open strings...E, A, D, G, B, E
2 - familiarise yourself with the pattern of notes along the low E string, you don't even need to learn it by heart yet, just have it for reference.

E F F# G G# A Bb B C D Eb E

3 - realise that the 12 fret is the octave of the open string, and therefore the same note.
4 - realise that the pattern of intervals is constant, so 12 th fret onwards is identical to open string onwards.

... as far as working out notes goes you are currently never more than 6 frets away from a reference note. However, counting along 6 frets is kind of clunky and not particularly easy, but it's a start.

5 - learn the notes that correspond to the next open string, so 5th fret on the E, A, D and B strings, 4th fret on the G

...all of a sudden you're never more than 3 frets way from a known reference note. All of a sudden working out the notes you don't know became a lot easier...almost twice as easy, in fact.

6 - locate the other octaves of the open notes, first the ones on the next string... 7th fret on the A, D, G and high E strings, 8th fret on the B string. Then the octaves two strings away so 2nd fret on the D and G strings, 3rd fret on the B and top E.

7 - in the same way, locate the octaves of the notes you learned in step 5

...all of a sudden you're now never more than 1 fret away from a known reference note, which basically means you know them all!


Thank you very much Steven!
#10
I'm currently trying to do the same thing, and was able to lock up 3 strings pretty fast, and sort-of a 4th which just leaves 2 to sort out

To start don't worry about sharps/flats. Once you know where C is finding C# is easy anyways.

For me since I started playing power chords I've automatically learned a bunch of notes on the E and A strings, so I just had to get used to filling in a few blanks et voila, 2/6 done.

Since you know the low E string, you already know the high E string too - 3/6

The D and G strings I'm still getting used to but again power chords will help. When you play a power chord on the E string, the note you fret on the D string is the same as the E (just one octave difference). Same thing applies for A and G. This can help get your bearings as being on 5th fret D is same as 3rd fret E - i.e. a G note. 5th fret G = 3rd fret A = C note

That does leave the B string without any easy reference point, so that one you've kinda got to learn on its own I guess (while there are probably similar relationships you could figure out, I find the others easier just because I actually use power chords all the time so visualizing the shape is a piece of cake).

Beyond that I've tried learning one note at a time, so far tho I've just practiced finding all the C's on the fret board. I tried adding G to the mix but that got confusing as they fall on the same frets just different strings (3rd, 5th, 8th, etc).

As mentioned above, don't sweat going past the 12th fret either. It's just a repetition of the first frets so once you know the first 12 you already know everything past 12!
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#11
I'm currently working on this myself. I've started with the E strings as they are the same. But you if take it one string at a time and say the name of the note as you play it. It makes a difference. Also, if you familiarize yourself with the A BC D EF G pattern of naturals it'll make finding the notes that much easier.
#12
i bought those fret stickers that name the note under the string and with enough messing around your bound to pick it up
#13
So would an F# on the low E string (2 fret) be the same as a G flat?
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#14
Quote by Ryan14
So would an F# on the low E string (2 fret) be the same as a G flat?


Yep.

Same sound, yes.