#1
Yesterday I walked into class and my physics teacher had this huge spreadsheet up on the projector on our grades and mine still had a few blanks in it. He said that to make up for it, i should make an essay and a presentation on anything I like involving physics principles. He wanted the essay and the presentation on two different things and I decided I wanted to do a presentation on how electric guitars work. I hate physics, but I do want to pass this class and I've always wondered how electric guitars work. I don't play electric so i have no idea how they work so if anyone can tell me or give me some links to websites that might help me, I would greatly appreciate it.
#3
Electromagnets detect the vibration of strings and convert it into an electric signal which the amplifier turns into an audible signal and pumps out the speaker.

Just google it.
#4
You are a girl ( I think). Just wear short skirts all the time and sit on teachers lap. A+
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#5
d(flux)/dt is how pickups work.
Quote by denizenz
I'll logic you right in the thyroid.

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#6
Quote by freedoms_stain
Electromagnets detect the vibration of strings and convert it into an electric signal which the amplifier turns into an audible signal and pumps out the speaker.

Just google it.



Basically the pickup function can be explained using Flemmings right Hand rule. (think its right anyway). Basically the pickups work by the strings moving over the pickups. The pickups are magnetised so it generates electric currents. Kinda like a really weak generator. I'd google it or try it on wikipedia
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#7
Quote by Andy2k64
Basically the pickup function can be explained using Flemmings right Hand rule. (think its right anyway). Basically the pickups work by the strings moving over the pickups. The pickups are magnetised so it generates electric currents. Kinda like a really weak generator. I'd google it or try it on wikipedia


Will the pickups pick up sound from nylon strings then?
Quote by Bubonic Chronic
With boys it's like "here's an incredibly complex sport to learn with sophisticated rules and various interdependent roles to play in a social unit."

For girls it's like "here's Barbie...you're fat!"
#8
Quote by dannyniceboy
Will the pickups pick up sound from nylon strings then?


No. They have to be conductors. That's why the pickups don't pick up the sounds of your hand or your annoying little sister's screams.
Quote by denizenz
I'll logic you right in the thyroid.

Art & Lutherie
#9
Quote by darkstar2466
No. They have to be conductors. That's why the pickups don't pick up the sounds of your hand or your annoying little sister's screams.
They have to be a magnetic metal, Iron, nickel or cobalt, any other metal doesn't exhibit magnetic properties without an electric current.
#10
Quote by freedoms_stain
They have to be a magnetic metal, Iron, nickel or cobalt, any other metal doesn't exhibit magnetic properties without an electric current.


Yeah, they have to be a metal that can be magnetized. Forgot to mention that.
Quote by denizenz
I'll logic you right in the thyroid.

Art & Lutherie
#11
Quote by darkstar2466
No. They have to be conductors. That's why the pickups don't pick up the sounds of your hand or your annoying little sister's screams.


Unless she screams in tune and the strings resonate...
#12
Quote by darkstar2466
d(flux)/dt is how pickups work.
No! NO! NOOOOOOO! BAD MEMORIES!!!

*Ahem* Sorry about that. But he's right. Basically, the magnets in the pickups create a magnetic field. When you pluck the string, the motion of the metal string distorts the magnetic field (per the law darkstar mentioned, which is Lentz's law, I think), and this creates the signal that is sent to the amplifier.
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#13
I did my advanved higher physics investigation on the electric guitar. 'Factors affecting the pitch of a plucked string'. EASIEST. REPORT. EVAR.
#14
physics is very interesting...Pickups are coils which work via electromagnetic induction...look it up!
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#15
Quote by aprescott_27
No! NO! NOOOOOOO! BAD MEMORIES!!!

*Ahem* Sorry about that. But he's right. Basically, the magnets in the pickups create a magnetic field. When you pluck the string, the motion of the metal string distorts the magnetic field (per the law darkstar mentioned, which is Lentz's law, I think), and this creates the signal that is sent to the amplifier.


*sinister laughter*

I love EM.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faraday%27s_law_of_induction
Quote by denizenz
I'll logic you right in the thyroid.

Art & Lutherie
#16
magnet in the pickup magnetizese the string

magnetic field of the magnetized string moves with the vibration of the string

the changing magnetnic field changes the total flux through the pickup coil and via faradays law of induction makes electrons move around -> they go to your amp, get the hell amplied out of them and make a speaker move forwards and backwards
Last edited by seljer at Apr 29, 2008,
#17
There's a hell of a lot more interesting physics to a guitar that just Faraday's law. The modes of vibration of the strings - that's damped oscillations for you (this is the bit that eventually gets *really* interesting, but only in second year of uni). The forces acting on the neck to keep it straight. The stuff going on in the electronics after the pickups. If the guitar has a floating trem, then the balancing of strings and springs is a short diversion.

The easiest of those is the first. Do some reading about standing waves in strings, and how the different modes add up to produce the overall sound.