#3
Quote by EdawMail
scales... scales... scales...



I agree! It's a pain but yeah scales are the way to go
#4
Quote by EdawMail
scales... scales... scales...

No. No. No.

Google Marty Friedman's Melodic Control.
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#5
^ no dont its too long.

you mean the lead melody or a solo? if its powerchord based just play around the minor pentatonic, and add chromatics and a flat 5th for a more bluesy sound.

if you mean lead melody for the vocals that should just come out of you, dont need to put much thought into it.

you dont necesarily need scales to write lead parts by the way
#6
The power chords will outline the type of scale to use.

But if you are writing over just a single power chord, really anything will do. The only thing to pay attention to is leading into the next chord. It's good to approach the next chord with an ascending chromatic.

Sparing that, you might just jump to a different (generally higher) position and "surprise" the listener when a chord changes.

The best way to learn these strategies is to record a few minutes of a riff repeating over and over and just jam over that. Keep trying to get more and more interesting stuff going, and eventually you will find a structure that works.

Some of the solos I've done have been, seriously, the 186th take or whatever.

I've played for three and four hours before I'm happy. I generally get a structure I like, then I keep pushing it up a notch, then another, then another.

Once I settle on a solo, then I just keep trying to up the energy. Play a little harder, a little more passionately.

Eventually it happens. But a well-crafted solo can take a lot of patience.
"Virtually no one who is taught Relativity continues to read the Bible."

#7
Quote by Grouch
^ no dont its too long.

you mean the lead melody or a solo? if its powerchord based just play around the minor pentatonic, and add chromatics and a flat 5th for a more bluesy sound.

if you mean lead melody for the vocals that should just come out of you, dont need to put much thought into it.

you dont necesarily need scales to write lead parts by the way

Okay then...
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#9
Quote by one vision
How is Marty Friedman's Melodic Control different from scales? In the end it's all the same thing, change along with the chords, keep it interesting, ect.

Yeah, in a way you're right, but he focuses more on chord-tones than scales, as the notes of a chord will naturally sound better over that chord. Scales are great of course, but "scales scales scales" isn't the answer. "Scales, arpeggios and phrasing" might be a better one.
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#12
Hahaha, this seems to be a popular argument these days...


I also suggest watching Melodic Control by Marty Friedman. It really changed my perspective on soloing.