#1
how would i solve this?...
(calculus)
A company knows that unit cost C and unit revenue R from the production and sale of x units are related by C= (R^2 / 182,000)+ 8033. Find the rate of change of revenue per unit when the cost per unit is changing by $11 and the revenue is $4000.
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#2
i'm taking 10th grade advanced geometry, can't help you, sorry....

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#4
Can't remember what it's called, opposite of integration

dC/dr = r/364,000

Then do something from there.


Probably... It's been a while since I've done maths.

EDIT: Ok never mind, that's just the rate of change of the cost...

EDIT2: Re-arrange it so 'r' is the subject of the equation, then differentiate it to find an equation for the rate of change of 'C'. After that just plug in some numbers...
Last edited by dangorironhide at Apr 30, 2008,
#6
pie....

everything = pie
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#8
Quote by ludachris0606
how would i solve this?...
(calculus)
A company knows that unit cost C and unit revenue R from the production and sale of x units are related by C= (R^2 / 182,000)+ 8033. Find the rate of change of revenue per unit when the cost per unit is changing by $11 and the revenue is $4000.



I cant help but think you have missed something out

Like where does x exist in the equation?
#9
i think if u differentiate both sides with respect to x...u get

dc/dx=(r/91000)dr/dx

and according to what u wrote (dc/dx)=11 and r=4000..
u do the rest
#10
Quote by spl3001
dR = (91000*11)/4000 = 250.25, I believe.

where do you get 91000?
Later in the evenin, as you lie awake in bed, hear the echoes of the amplifiers ringin' in your head, smoke the days last cigarette rememberin' what she said...
#11
182,000/2, because if you are taking the derivative with respect to R, the R^2/182,000 becomes 2R/182,000, or R/91,000
#12
Why is it only ever high school math the pit is stuck at?

Does no one on here have an education?
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#13
Quote by darthteet
Why is it only ever high school math the pit is stuck at?

Does no one on here have an education?


nope....
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I pull out, I hear this noise. It sounded like a trumpet, kazoo, and a fart. It felt like one of those dryers used in restrooms, on my dick. It was the largest queef known to man. I proceeded to say "Someone needs a queef muffler"
#14
Quote by darthteet
Why is it only ever high school math the pit is stuck at?

Does no one on here have an education?

Nah, we have British college Maths too. Any further and people can't help out

Gawd sakes, call it maths, it's like calling physics physic.
#16
Quote by ludachris0606
how would i solve this?...
(calculus)
A company knows that unit cost C and unit revenue R from the production and sale of x units are related by C= (R^2 / 182,000)+ 8033. Find the rate of change of revenue per unit when the cost per unit is changing by $11 and the revenue is $4000.


ok so dc/dx = $11 dc/dr = 91000r

therefore dx/dr = 11/91000r

then dr/dx = 91000r/11 dr/dx being therate of change of the revenue in respec to x(the number of units)

therefore for each individual unit it is 91000r/11/x = 8272.73r/x

im prob full of crap but is that the answer????