#1
As I take my guitar playing more seriously lately, I notice that I fret a bit too hard and pull out of tune. This happens especially with the low notes in first position chords such as G and C. Even though I know I'm pressing too hard, I really don't feel like I'm placing that much pressure on the strings and I'm finding it difficult to get the right balance.

It's a new guitar, and the intonation is pretty damned good. If I tune the string just right, I can take a tuner and go up each string and get the right note all they way to the 12th fret. But it's a lot easier to get a single note perfect when you're watching a tuner than it is to get a chord perfect when you're playing a song.

I've been Googling and searching here to find tips, lessons, techniques, etc. on proper fretting to get a better quality intonation out of each chord/note, but can't really find anything on this.

Can anyone offer some suggestions or links? Is there anything I can do in terms of placement of my fingers relative to the fret itself? (*shrugs* just grasping here)

I know I'm nitpicking here and most likely nobody else can tell when I'm on stage, but I can tell and it's buggin' me. Especially when I'm trying to record and feel like it's never perfect.
#2
try fretting closer to the fret
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#3
How accurate is your tuner? Aim for 1 cent accuracy.

And your problem is really weird. How out of tune are you talking about? Do you just have superhuman hearing?
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#4
Quote by icon_player_5
try fretting closer to the fret


Yeah, I did try that (which is why I mentioned fret placement), but it doesn't seem to help much.
    #5
    Quote by SLD.Potato
    How accurate is your tuner? Aim for 1 cent accuracy.

    And your problem is really weird. How out of tune are you talking about? Do you just have superhuman hearing?


    I couldn't tell you how accurate my tuner is, but I'm sure it's nothing compared to a good strobe tuner. It's just the built in one (acoustic/electric with pre-amp and tuner).

    And I my ear isn't fantastic, which is probably why it's buggin' me so much. I figure if it's buggin' me, it's gotta be considerable.

    Even without a perfect tuner, I can tell and (to my ear) it's pretty obvious. But like I said, I might just be nitpicking, it's just I'm trying to get the best sound I can as I try to get better in general.
      #6
      this kind of confuses me. The amount of pressure should have nothing to do with the tonality of the chord or note, atleast from what I know .

      One thing you might want to watch, I use to try and pull of this chord whilst over stretching my fingers, and because it was too long of a stretch I would pull one of the strings up (I would bend the string unintentionally) and the chord sounded awful.

      Are you bending any strings on accident, or maybe playing the open chords on the wrong fret?
      #7
      Quote by phillyguitar
      this kind of confuses me. The amount of pressure should have nothing to do with the tonality of the chord or note, atleast from what I know .


      Oh it definitely does. You can test it yourself. Grab your guitar and hit the 6th string at th 3rd fret (Low G). Keep hitting the note with a pick and vary the pressure at which you're fretting and you will see as you press harder, the pitch will pull sharp.

      Check out pages like this: http://www.wikihow.com/Set-Your-Guitar's-Intonation

      "Even with a standard un-scalloped fretboard it is possible (especially on guitar) to bend the string sharp several cents by fretting too hard. "


      Quote by phillyguitar

      Are you bending any strings on accident, or maybe playing the open chords on the wrong fret?


      Nope, not bending the strings.
        #8
        one thing you can do is switch to thicker strings. it wont eliminate all your intonation problems completely, but the thicker strings will be harder to pull out of tune than lighter strings. i'm using mediums right now and it's amost perfect. i only had this problem when barring chords mainly.

        the only other solution is to practice using the right amount of pressure. most people press a lot harder than they really need to. use as little force as possible to get the string down.

        that's the only things i can think of right now... so... good luck.
        #9
        Quote by captivate
        one thing you can do is switch to thicker strings. it wont eliminate all your intonation problems completely, but the thicker strings will be harder to pull out of tune than lighter strings. i'm using mediums right now and it's amost perfect. i only had this problem when barring chords mainly.

        the only other solution is to practice using the right amount of pressure. most people press a lot harder than they really need to. use as little force as possible to get the string down.

        that's the only things i can think of right now... so... good luck.


        Thicker strings makes sense, but I think I'm just going to have to practice proper pressure. From what I've been told (and I realize it can be another nitpick), you want to use the string gauge recommended for your particular guitar to avoid neck problems.

        Granted, it's not like I'm playing a custom $10,000 Beard guitar or anything (check out this one ), but I wanna take care of what I got the best I can.
          #10
          Moat acoustic guitars can handle medium gauge strings, you probably dont have to worry about putting on some mediums