#1
So I've really been paying attention to the actual notes some of my favorite guitarists are playing in their leads, Hendrix, Clapton, Page, to name a few and they almost always (not always) seem to be playing the notes of the rhythm chord in their leads in some shape or form. One solo I noticed was Badge. Is this something I need to become proficient at? by that I mean playing the notes from the rhythm chord in the leads. And is this a way the greats make their leads so melodic? Thanks
#2
You'll want to play notes that make sense in the key of the song as well as over the chord. Chord tones work well, but that restricts you to 3 notes, so you'll develop the ability to connect those three notes in interesting ways.

Friedman talks about this concept a lot in the "Melodic Control" video in my sig.
#3
^^^Ya I tried to watch that and did see part of it.......but it wouldn't load but about 10 minutes of it
#4
Quote by bangoodcharlote
You'll want to play notes that make sense in the key of the song as well as over the chord. Chord tones work well, but that restricts you to 3 notes, so you'll develop the ability to connect those three notes in interesting ways.

Friedman talks about this concept a lot in the "Melodic Control" video in my sig.


Great video.

Arpeggios are great tools to have, but using them exclusively can get pretty boring.

Yes, it is something that you should at least know to do. You don't need to be a pro at it, but having a working knowledge of it is valuable. Arpeggios allow you to make a solo more melodic and connected to the rhythm.
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#5
Arpeggios and using chord tones are not the same thing.

If I'm playing over a static Am chord and I play E C A, that's an Am arp. If over that same static Am chord I play A C B D C E D B E and hold that last E note, you're still sustaining a consonant chord tone but you didn't play an arpeggio.
#6
well the fun thing is wtih arpeggios you can use different ones than the chord its played over to make cooler chord implying. What i mean is like using a Emin arp over an Amin chord and so the notes of Emin and Amin chords mesh. often it works well, sometimes it dosent sound so good.
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#7
Quote by jimmyslashpage
So I've really been paying attention to the actual notes some of my favorite guitarists are playing in their leads, Hendrix, Clapton, Page, to name a few and they almost always (not always) seem to be playing the notes of the rhythm chord in their leads in some shape or form. One solo I noticed was Badge. Is this something I need to become proficient at? by that I mean playing the notes from the rhythm chord in the leads. And is this a way the greats make their leads so melodic? Thanks

That's because chords are made from scales, and the notes that appear in the chords you're playing over are like your "safe points", notes from the scale that you know you can use in your soloing and sound correct.

For example, if you're playing in the key of Em - the notes of the Em scale are

E F# G A B C D

and the notes of the Em chord are

E G B

so there's quite an overlap

chords and scales are the same thing at the end of the day, notes that fit together, they're just presented differently.
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