#1
I see myself progressing as a musician and guitarist but I wanted to know what you guys think I should know eg what scales, what knowledge etc etc?
#2
Theory. Lots of it.

But start out with learning the names of the notes and the semitones and tones between them (if you don't know them already). Then learn the major scale and how it's formed, then the minor scales (all types) and how they're formed. Then do pentatonics (though you can do them first as they're really useful in rock).

When you know all that do time sigs, keys, modes, learn to read standard notation ect.
#3
^This is what I'd suggest as well, although I'd say learn how to read notation first, it makes everything easier. Even if that's all you learn, learn standard notation.
Ka pu te ruha ka hao te rangatahi.
#4
Yeah, learning standard notation helps you to understand intervals much better and is very useful in ear training.

But as for what you should know, that's really up to you. What do you currently know and what sort of music are you into?
#5
I'm not sure what level you're at now, but I'll do my best.

Learn the major scale in all keys on all areas of the fretboard. When I say learn it, I mean play it on each individual string, on each set of two strings, on each set of three strings, and so on until you can freely improvise with it on all 6 strings. Learn what chords come from it, and why. Learn the structure of and nomenclature of as many chords as you can get your head around. Make it a goal to learn at least 5 different voicings of each of the most-used chords: major, minor, diminished, augmented, major 7th, minor 7th, dominant 7, and diminished 7.

Follow the same process that you did with the major scale to learn harmonic minor, melodic minor, the whole-tone scale, the diminished scales, and the pentatonic scales.

Learn about rhythm. First learn about time signatures and the differrences between simple and compound time. From there, I would start making a notebook of rhythmic ideas. Know how to play a certain number of notes over a certain number of beats at will. The easiest way to do this is systematically. Start with the possible number of notes to play over 1 beat, then move on to 2 beats, 3 beats, 4 beats, and 5 beats. I don't know if you'll ever need to know anything beyond that. Always use a metronome when you're working on this. Not all of your work has to be based on the systematic way of doing things. Sit down some days and figure out interesting rhythms by slapping your hands on your knees, then translate those rhythms to the guitar, and WRITE THEM DOWN.
#6
Quote by titopuente
I'm not sure what level you're at now, but I'll do my best.

Learn the major scale in all keys on all areas of the fretboard. When I say learn it, I mean play it on each individual string, on each set of two strings, on each set of three strings, and so on until you can freely improvise with it on all 6 strings. Learn what chords come from it, and why. Learn the structure of and nomenclature of as many chords as you can get your head around. Make it a goal to learn at least 5 different voicings of each of the most-used chords: major, minor, diminished, augmented, major 7th, minor 7th, dominant 7, and diminished 7.

Follow the same process that you did with the major scale to learn harmonic minor, melodic minor, the whole-tone scale, the diminished scales, and the pentatonic scales.

Learn about rhythm. First learn about time signatures and the differrences between simple and compound time. From there, I would start making a notebook of rhythmic ideas. Know how to play a certain number of notes over a certain number of beats at will. The easiest way to do this is systematically. Start with the possible number of notes to play over 1 beat, then move on to 2 beats, 3 beats, 4 beats, and 5 beats. I don't know if you'll ever need to know anything beyond that. Always use a metronome when you're working on this. Not all of your work has to be based on the systematic way of doing things. Sit down some days and figure out interesting rhythms by slapping your hands on your knees, then translate those rhythms to the guitar, and WRITE THEM DOWN.


This is the most helpful reply I've had. Does anyone have any links.
Btw I already know most of this stuff I just wanted to know what you guys thought I should know. Also I can read music but I can only convert it to guitar using the first 4(5 on e string), so does anyone have any tips or links?
#7
Quote by Darkmessiahnz
This is the most helpful reply I've had. Does anyone have any links.
Btw I already know most of this stuff I just wanted to know what you guys thought I should know. Also I can read music but I can only convert it to guitar using the first 4(5 on e string), so does anyone have any tips or links?

I'd buy a theory book personally; as always, I recommend The Complete Idiot's Guide to Music Theory. As for reading music and "converting on the first 4", I don't know what you mean - could you please clarify this?

I'll be happy to help; I'm up late reliving my younger days through Final Fantasy 3.
#9
^Get yourself this book:http://www.amazon.com/Modern-Method-Guitar-Volumes-Complete/dp/0876390114/ref=pd_bbs_sr_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1209865462&sr=8-3

It will teach you all the common scales and the different positions in which you play them so that you can see how the position relates to your sight reading. After you're done with that, I'd suggest Melodic Rhythms For Guitar for some more advanced sight reading exercises.