#1
As I research a way to add more distortion to my blues junior, I notice that there are three options. The best is of course adding yet another tube (or using the spare tube stage), but two other ways seems simpler and easier

Method 1: Just use a metal muff in front of blues junior
Method 2: Insert a diode clipping circuit, ala JCM900 2500. I would either use diode bridge, or use three diodes for a simple assymetric clipping.

What is the sound difference, and which one is suitable for what style? Furthermore, which one will be more tube like, and which one will have better gain?
Ibanez SA-120 (ed.2006)
BluesJr 1996-B + cathode follower + texas Heat
Crate CPB150
Homemade 4 x 10 cab Bass closeback
Metal Muff
#2
I would imagine the metal muff is the easier, i'm not particularly diode-savvy, but i imagine putting an extra tube in would sound better
lol@u
#3
Quote by Jestersage
As I research a way to add more distortion to my blues junior, I notice that there are three options. The best is of course adding yet another tube (or using the spare tube stage), but two other ways seems simpler and easier

Method 1: Just use a metal muff in front of blues junior
Method 2: Insert a diode clipping circuit, ala JCM900 2500. I would either use diode bridge, or use three diodes for a simple assymetric clipping.\
Use one diode for asymmetric clipping, two for symmetric.

Quote by Jestersage
What is the sound difference, and which one is suitable for what style?
The metal muff uses diode clipping. Same principle. The pedal has a 3 band eq, etc. You have more options for tone-shaping.

Quote by Jestersage
Furthermore, which one will be more tube like,
Neither.
This is strictly solid state distortion.

Quote by Jestersage

and which one will have better gain?
Gain is amplification. You're adding amplification with the pedal, but not when simply adding diodes. Do the math.
Meadows
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#4
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
Use one diode for asymmetric clipping, two for symmetric.

The metal muff uses diode clipping. Same principle. The pedal has a 3 band eq, etc. You have more options for tone-shaping.

Neither.
This is strictly solid state distortion.

Gain is amplification. You're adding amplification with the pedal, but not when simply adding diodes. Do the math.


I always thought Gain and Distortion were the same thing.
I got some good guitars, yo.
#5
Quote by Leat
I always thought Gain and Distortion were the same thing.
Then you were always wrong.

Too much gain can cause distortion, if it makes the signal to large for later stages to handle without going into non-linear regions of operation. But gain is definitely not the same thing as distortion.
Meadows
Quote by Jackal58
I release my inner liberal every morning when I take a shit.
Quote by SK8RDUDE411
I wont be like those jerks who dedicate their beliefs to logic and reaosn.
#6
Okay, when I said "gain" I meant "high gain sound", which is typically accomp-lished by distortion.

At first my theory is that using three diodes (demonstrated in an instrutable) or a diode bridge (4+1, ala JCM900) would provide a more tube-like high gain distortion (since it will be inserted within the tube signal path itself) than using a Metal Muff, but someone say it doesn't make a difference. is that true?
Ibanez SA-120 (ed.2006)
BluesJr 1996-B + cathode follower + texas Heat
Crate CPB150
Homemade 4 x 10 cab Bass closeback
Metal Muff
Last edited by Jestersage at May 2, 2008,
#7
Just wondering... does doing the diode clipping distortion in the tube signal better (between v1a and v1b) or is metal muff better? I am not concern about the price, but the sound quality.
Ibanez SA-120 (ed.2006)
BluesJr 1996-B + cathode follower + texas Heat
Crate CPB150
Homemade 4 x 10 cab Bass closeback
Metal Muff