#1
Okay, so i just had a sudden revelation. (This is pretty stupid, i know) Ive known for a while now that scales are notes, and not box shapes. Well lately i have been treating them as box shapes, which i should never have done. I realized that in order to get everything out of the scales, i need to learn EVERY note on the fretboard.....how long does this take??? Because there are 144 notes to memorize, but if i do, ill be able to do anything i want with my playing So any tips to help with this new project of mine, or anything in particular to help me along??

Thanks!

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#3
There are only 12 notes to memorise They just repeat themselves after the 12th fret, so basically you could get away with learning the notes for the first 12 frets of the low E and A strings. Anything past that will be an octave of one of those notes so it's fairly easy to work out.
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#4
Quote by timi_hendrix
There are only 12 notes to memorise They just repeat themselves after the 12th fret, so basically you could get away with learning the notes for the first 12 frets of the low E and A strings. Anything past that will be an octave of one of those notes so it's fairly easy to work out.



nah, i mean where the notes are on the fretboard. What i want is to look at the fretboard and be like "Oh, well theres A, theres B, " etc, etc. You know?

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

#5
to think in pure notes instead of the patterns of the scales takes a loooong time and is hard work if you don't have a music theory background like myself, atleast in my opinion.

I consider it just something to work on, as long as you understand what scale you are using and why it sounds the way it does, I think you are ok. Modes take a little more knowhow so, you can work towards those and build your music theory/note knowledge.
#6
Hey gizzer.

In the same boat as you are!

Did find a website with a interactive fretboard which is www.notesonstrings.com but there are other ones out there too if you google 'interactive fretboard'

Good luck
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#7
Start by learning the positions of all the naturals (as in no sharps) or the notes where the fret markers are located. This will allow you to approximate what note you are on if you don't know it immediately.
#8
it usually takes less than a week, it's all very logical, read the things said and you'll have it down before you even know it.. good thing to come to this revelation, it's one of the most important things you need to know before actually playing the instrument
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#9
Ive known for a while now that scales are notes, and not box shapes
Yes, a scale is a collection of notes. However these notes form a shape on the fretboard. At the very least, there is no harm in learning the shape. It is not learning box shapes that will hold you back, but forgetting that a scale is a collection of notes.
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#10
Another thing is, a scale is a chord and vice versa.

Granted, ABCDE is a pretty weird chord, but we could work it out.

If take those five and break 'em up, we can set it up this way (in thirds)...


A-C-E-B-D
1-3-5-9-4(11)


Thus this five-note A minor "scale" now has a new name - A minor Sus4 add 9



So the more important thing to know is chords.

If you know the open chords (CAGED), then you already have the tools you need to learn the neck.

Soloing, or melodic playing in general is more about moving in and out of complementary chord tones than playing "a scale" or "a mode."

So learn the first five frets backwards and forwards, upside down and sideways, then translate all of that knowledge to the rest of the neck.
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#11
I started by learning all the notes on the low E and A string. Then I learned where the octaves of those notes are found. Knowing that everything repeats every 12 frets made learning the entire neck pretty simple.
#12
^^ It's more helpful to learn across the strings because that is how the guitar is designed.

Still, learning is learning, and it won't hurt ya'.
"Virtually no one who is taught Relativity continues to read the Bible."

#13
Quote by Bubonic Chronic


A-C-E-B-D
1-3-5-9-4(11)


Thus this five-note A minor "scale" now has a new name - A minor Sus4 add 9


Easier just to call it Am11(no 7). It's not really a sus4 because it contains the 3rd.
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#14
it usually takes less than a week, it's all very logical, read the things said and you'll have it down before you even know it.. good thing to come to this revelation, it's one of the most important things you need to know before actually playing the instrument


Dont listen to this guy; he is WRONNG. I'll give anyone a million dollars who can memorize the entire fretboard in a week well enough to actually use it (heavy emphasis on actually, dont lie) in a useful manner. You have to get incredibley comfortable with it in order to use that knowledge on the fly and it takes weeks or months.

I think some good things to keep in mind if you're gonna learn the notes arre:

1) there are only 12 * 6 = 72 locations of notes to memorize, because it's identical above the 12th fret (duh)


2) there is a logic to where the notes are, so it's not really as if you are memorizing 72 separate things, because they are all heavily related.

3) there are only actually 4 versions of each note (4 octaves) except for e, which has an extra 5th octave version (if you have a 24 fret guitar). Try to pay attention to which version of which note you are playing, it will really help to understand the fretboard more. Learning to sightread for guitar is very good for reinforcing this, since it helps you to make a very concrete association with the location of multiple places on the fretboard, say bstring 1st fret gstring 5th fret d string 10th fret a string 15th fret and Estring 20th fret, with one single location on the treble staff, in this case all of those locations would be "middle c".
This helped me get better at sight reading: http://johncomino.tripod.com/sight.htm

4) Like someone said, learn where CDEFGABC are first, which will allow you to play fairly easy anywhere on the fretboard in the key of C.

5) guitar is special in the uniform way the fretboard is laid out, so you can learn scale shapes and play in any key, as long as you know where the root is, even if you can't moniter where the actual notes themselves are fast enough. When I'm playing in keys that I am sort of uncomfortable with on guitar, say Db major and B major I generally play mostly patterns, and try to use note locations to sort of fill in the gaps, if a run takes me to a spot where I lose track of what pattern, or box shape I'm in.
If you know the notes in the key of C, it's really easy to separate the 7, 3 note per string box shapes that make up the major system (to get them play the notes in the key of C with 3 notes per string starting on C, then on D, and E, and so on. I would recommend learning all 7 of those box shapes and then the 5 pentatonic box shapes.

6) If you have a solid understanding of where the notes are in addition to knowing these box shapes you'll be playing like a pro in no time.

well anyway shoot me a PM if you have any questions...
#15
As for placement of where the natural notes are on the fret board.
(All of the white keys on the piano)
1/2 step between E/F and C/B
Everything else in between are either going to be flat or sharp,
so i don't focus too much on those...it's just commonsence

It would be only 60..after you chop the fret board in half
The Top and bottom string being the same as E.

If you Bar your finger at the 7th fret. it'll be as if your playing
a 7string guitar at the nut posistion if you added a lower string and tune it to B.

Anyway, on a six string it's as if your playing it as open or at the nut.
Just shuffle everything down one string.
The notes shift up one fret at the small B and E string.

After a while you'll start to recognize it in other places, depending what
you use as your reference piont.

Example, if you bar your finger at the 5th fret , it's as if everything moved up
one string as open posistion (5th fret E string is the A note.)
Last edited by Ordinary at May 4, 2008,
#16
Quote by valennic

nah, i mean where the notes are on the fretboard. What i want is to look at the fretboard and be like "Oh, well theres A, theres B, " etc, etc. You know?

There's still only 12 "things" to learn though - the names of the notes themselves and the pattern they follow.

1 - learn the open strings...E, A, D, G, B, E
2 - familiarise yourself with the pattern of notes along the low E string, you don't even need to learn it by heart yet, just have it for reference.

E F F# G G# A Bb B C D Eb

3 - realise that the 12 fret is the octave of the open string, and therefore the same note.
4 - realise that the pattern of intervals is constant, so 12 th fret onwards is identical to open string onwards.

... as far as working out notes goes you are currently never more than 6 frets away from a reference note. However, counting along 6 frets is kind of clunky and not particularly easy, but it's a start.

5 - learn the notes that correspond to the next open string, so 5th fret on the E, A, D and B strings, 4th fret on the G

...all of a sudden you're never more than 3 frets way from a known reference note. All of a sudden working out the notes you don't know became a lot easier...almost twice as easy, in fact.

6 - locate the other octaves of the open notes, first the ones on the next string... 7th fret on the A, D, G and high E strings, 8th fret on the B string. Then the octaves two strings away so 2nd fret on the D and G strings, 3rd fret on the B and top E.

7 - in the same way, locate the octaves of the notes you learned in step 5

...all of a sudden you're now never more than 1 fret away from a known reference note, which basically means you know them all!
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