#1
I was listening to some schoenberg and bach recently and found looking at the audio spectrum for the music, the mids in classical are really scooped, theyre not really there as in the real centre mids, theres some low and high mids. so I decided to investigate and looking at violins, violas, pianos, brass instruments they seem to be one extreme or the other.

anyone got any idea about this ? could it to be to do with projection and back then a very detailed mid range would have sounded very muddy in a concert hall so instruments where made for very distinct bassy, or trebly sounds ?

oh and i know mp3 encoding on certain settings can scoop your mids, i was looking at uncompressed files
#2
I always belived they were bass and or treble oriented so that each instruments beuty would shine through and fade together.
If what you say is true i would say it may be because reverberation of midrangeing frequencys can get harsh quite fast when there are several instruments or instruments of different tonal "width" for lack of a better term.
#3
Mid-range tones (generally) don't accentuate notes, they accentuate the power of the notes. The "definition" of a note comes from either end of the spectrum, not from the middle. Most acoustic (orchestral) instruments are built with the emphasis on sounding those notes distinctly rather than sounding those notes powerfully. Too much mid-range kills the tonal definition and will indeed make things muddy, especially in a larger setting with multiple instruments.
#5
Quote by zeppelinfreak51
Ever heard of a french horn? Yea.

Last time i heard someone say French horn they where talking about this time when his girl frie.... Ive said too much
#6
Quote by zeppelinfreak51
Ever heard of a french horn? Yea.


its a middle register instrument, but if u look at the frequency response curve, it more a treble and high mids sound, well, thats what sort of curves i'm seeing

#7
Quote by Def
its a middle register instrument, but if u look at the frequency response curve, it more a treble and high mids sound, well, thats what sort of curves i'm seeing

What are you using to view the audio spectrum? That's characteristic of a lot of brass instruments though. Have you tried viewing the Sound envelope and the harmonic series for particular instruments. If not I recommend doing so, as that can give you a better idea of how each individual instrument should sound. If you then compare that to your recordings then you should get a better idea of how the recordings are being EQed. Might also pay to analyze an unEQed orchestra performing some pieces to get a better idea of how it sounds as a whole naturally as well.

The reason I suggest this is because most engineers when recording an orchestra will
EQ out alot of the mids, due to the overlapping frequency envelopes which makes it alot harder to distinguish each instruments timbre. This is also done alot live as well for the same reason.
Ka pu te ruha ka hao te rangatahi.