#1
I just got Speed Mechs. for Lead Guitar yesterday, and I'm doing the first few legato and alt. picking excercises. Do I really need to be able to play the 1234, or 8765 fret patterns? I'm only at about 70 bpm with them right now, and I hate them. So if I don't think I'll be doing much chromatic shredding in the future, do I need them? Or are they really important? Thanks.
Quote by darkstar2466
Bigfoot.... The Abominable Snowman.... Chinese Democracy.... all stories, nothing more.


#2
^ they're important for training your hands to do one finger for fret. i personally would say they're pretty important. you want to be able to accurately fly over the strings with no impedence. these exercises help you do this.
#4
Quote by edg
No. But, you may want to ask yourself why you hate them.
You can always come back to them. I don't think you have to go in
any particular order in that book.


i can't speak for him but he might not like them because they're not inherently musical. you can always come back to them though, i didn't start doing those until i had been playing for 6 or 7 years.
#5
Quote by mydogpoops
I just got Speed Mechs. for Lead Guitar yesterday, and I'm doing the first few legato and alt. picking excercises. Do I really need to be able to play the 1234, or 8765 fret patterns? I'm only at about 70 bpm with them right now, and I hate them. So if I don't think I'll be doing much chromatic shredding in the future, do I need them? Or are they really important? Thanks.



No you don't need them. I would recommend avoiding the quasi-chromatic thing altogether and work on more musically applicable exercises.

Quote by z4twenny
they're not inherently musical.


exactly. the result of practicing something non-musical will be...... non-musical.

there are so many other things you could work on that would achieve the same thing technically, yet not leave out the musicality aspect.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at May 2, 2008,
#6
Quote by GuitarMunky


there are so many other things you could work on that would achieve the same thing technically, yet not leave out the musicality aspect.


yes this is true. but you know what i always say

yup thats right....

better to have it and not need it, than to need it and not have it.
#7
Quote by z4twenny
i can't speak for him but he might not like them because they're not inherently musical.


It was more a question to get him to think about it.

As I recall, I didn't like them either when I opened that book. But rather than
leaving it at that and avoiding them, I asked myself why I didn't like them. Then
I evaluated how much I use legato, how much these were likely to help,
and finally if it was worth putting in the time to *learn* to like them.

FWIW, I picked Exercise 7, which was the hardest and most interesting challenge
and stuck with it for a while. Doing a lot of chromatic purmutations has diminishing
returns and actually doesn't prepare you all that well for doing things like pulloffs
over 2 whole steps which involves bigger stretches.
#8
Quote by z4twenny

better to have it and not need it, than to need it and not have it.


I've heard that before, and I have to say I've never agreed with it.


I pick and choose what tools to put in the tool box. When I open up the tool box, I want to be able to find the tool I need and use it. I dont want to have to search through the clutter to find it. I want the right tools for the right job.

I would say its better to have what you need and USE it. Having something and not needing it is useless.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at May 2, 2008,