Poll: Malcolm X
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View poll results: Malcolm X
Good
41 63%
Bad
24 37%
Voters: 65.
#1
well, he was the spokesperson for the NOI (the black equivilent to the KKK according to Urban Dictionary), and made some pretty rude remaked reguarding the assassination of JFK.

and he was a critic of nonviolence. (look up nonviolence on wiki)

but, he turned on the NOI and all that and was assassinated by them cause of it but whatever.

he influenced Chuck D .
#5
He was a bit militant for my taste but he was fighting for the right thing. MLK was way more my kinda guy.
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#7
Badass.

I think he was good. I'd be fed up if my people were oppressed for hundreds of years.
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#8
He was more active leader of the civil rights movement, while MLK was a more passive. Nonetheless, he was still a brilliant man, and a large influence on the movement
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#9
I find MX more interesting to read about, but MLK had the right message, and went about it the right way. Malcolm X, whilst being a part of the Civil Rights movement - a very good movement - he was a Black Supremacist and if he had more power he would have made life bad for many white people IMHO. Martin wanted equality, not revenge.
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#10
i said yes only because his Autobiography by Alex Haley was so good.
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#11
I read his autobiography for school last marking period. I was pretty angry while reading it up until the part where he leaves for Mecca. Up until that point, he was ignorant to the fact that people of different cultures could live together harmoniously. However, after observing the many different races and heritages all going to pay tribute, his mindset changed. People focus too much on his previous beliefs, and don't acknowledge his change of heart.
Peace.
#12
Overall, good.

After he became a muslim, big change.
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#13
Quote by lateraluspiral
i said yes only because his Autobiography by Alex Haley was so good.



How can an autobiography be by another person?
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#15
Quote by meh!
How can an autobiography be by another person?


It was basically Malcolm X narrating it, but Alex Haley writing it all down.
Peace.
#17
Quote by lateraluspiral
i said yes only because his Autobiography by Alex Haley was so good.


his autobiography would have to be by himself, that's what makes it an autobiography

on topic i think he was good, he did make an impact and it would be interesting to see whether or not MLK would have been as successful without Malcom X's impact.
#18
imo he was good,
after all he didn't go around starting fights or anything,
he just wanted prejudice against black people to end
#20
This response could span books - but I'll try to keep it short. You're summary of Malcom X doesn't even skim the surface of his life's work. People only focus on the "negative" aspects of his life - the violence, etc. And that's understandable, because he said and wrote a lot in support of violence - but as a means of resistance. You have to put Malcolm X in to context. Violence has been, and largely remains, a fact of life for blacks in this country (read: I use the word blacks, instead of politically correct term, because of the way issues of racism center - it isn't about being correct, it is a visceral reaction to the perceived differences between people which are most readily evident through skin colors). Malcolm X's father was murdered (lynched, to use the appropriate term) by the KKK for supporting Marcus Garvey's radicalism

For the Urban Dictionary to compare the Nation of Islam to the Klu Klux Klan is to miss the point entirely. While the KKK used public violence to perpetuate the status quo of racial hierarchy, the NOI talked about responding with violence instead of allowing themselves to be trampled. Think about it - how many lynchings have you heard of? A few? Maybe you know that it was " a lot" - statistics would tell you that roughly 5,000 people were lynched between 1882 and 1965 - roughly 4,000 of whom were black. Numbers veil the fact that these lives were stamped out for the color of their skin.

If you really want to talk about the issue of violence vs. non-violence you have to look at Malcom X before and after his Hajj. Read The Autobiography of Malcolm X if you actually care about this question. Because the end is truly beautiful. Malcolm X spent most of his adult life absolutely pissed off at "white devils" etc. But after his Hajj, in the weeks before his assassination, that changed. The Hajj showed him a number of things, perhaps the most important of which was the fact that the NOI presented a seriously perverted version of Islam - it merely sought to increase the divide between white and black. Maybe the Urban Dictionary is right on this part - both the KKK and the NOI wanted to maintain a division of the races. In any case, what Malcolm X saw in Mecca was that true Islam is about BROTHERHOOD. Its about loving human beings, not hating them because of something as arbitrary as "black" or "white."

So, you want the single-sentence answer? Malcolm X was a brilliant man who was blinded from truth by the hatred that has divided human beings for centuries. He may have learned this too late, but his death can only illuminate the truth in your eyes.

Before you respond questioning what I've posted, let me say this - I'm just someone who sees an enormous amount of confusion, hate and ignorance in the world. I would like to point out that I'm not a religious man. My comments about Islam, etc., should only go to show the connection between it and other world religions - love, not hate, is what this species needs. Perhaps spending the ten minutes writing this response to an aimless post in an online forum was a waste. I can't make that judgment. All that I do know is you indirectly asked a question that consumes me - why do we hate each other?
#21
^ this guy knows whats up.
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#23
He was good for trying to get equal rights, but the way he went about it wasn't quite the best way.

Then again you can't blame him. While MLK grew up with Gandhi in the spotlight, Malcom X grew up with the violence in Kenya.


...Good and bad I say.
#24
Quote by aguacateojos
This response could span books - but I'll try to keep it short. You're summary of Malcom X doesn't even skim the surface of his life's work. People only focus on the "negative" aspects of his life - the violence, etc. And that's understandable, because he said and wrote a lot in support of violence - but as a means of resistance. You have to put Malcolm X in to context. Violence has been, and largely remains, a fact of life for blacks in this country (read: I use the word blacks, instead of politically correct term, because of the way issues of racism center - it isn't about being correct, it is a visceral reaction to the perceived differences between people which are most readily evident through skin colors). Malcolm X's father was murdered (lynched, to use the appropriate term) by the KKK for supporting Marcus Garvey's radicalism

For the Urban Dictionary to compare the Nation of Islam to the Klu Klux Klan is to miss the point entirely. While the KKK used public violence to perpetuate the status quo of racial hierarchy, the NOI talked about responding with violence instead of allowing themselves to be trampled. Think about it - how many lynchings have you heard of? A few? Maybe you know that it was " a lot" - statistics would tell you that roughly 5,000 people were lynched between 1882 and 1965 - roughly 4,000 of whom were black. Numbers veil the fact that these lives were stamped out for the color of their skin.

If you really want to talk about the issue of violence vs. non-violence you have to look at Malcom X before and after his Hajj. Read The Autobiography of Malcolm X if you actually care about this question. Because the end is truly beautiful. Malcolm X spent most of his adult life absolutely pissed off at "white devils" etc. But after his Hajj, in the weeks before his assassination, that changed. The Hajj showed him a number of things, perhaps the most important of which was the fact that the NOI presented a seriously perverted version of Islam - it merely sought to increase the divide between white and black. Maybe the Urban Dictionary is right on this part - both the KKK and the NOI wanted to maintain a division of the races. In any case, what Malcolm X saw in Mecca was that true Islam is about BROTHERHOOD. Its about loving human beings, not hating them because of something as arbitrary as "black" or "white."

So, you want the single-sentence answer? Malcolm X was a brilliant man who was blinded from truth by the hatred that has divided human beings for centuries. He may have learned this too late, but his death can only illuminate the truth in your eyes.

Before you respond questioning what I've posted, let me say this - I'm just someone who sees an enormous amount of confusion, hate and ignorance in the world. I would like to point out that I'm not a religious man. My comments about Islam, etc., should only go to show the connection between it and other world religions - love, not hate, is what this species needs. Perhaps spending the ten minutes writing this response to an aimless post in an online forum was a waste. I can't make that judgment. All that I do know is you indirectly asked a question that consumes me - why do we hate each other?

Damn, you nailed it.
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OMGWTFBBQ
#26
I would say that the Blank Panthers were the black equivalent to the KKK, but really you could make a strong argument either way.


My mind is going. I can feel it.
#27
Quote by MTVget0FFtheAIR
I would say that the Blank Panthers were the black equivalent to the KKK, but really you could make a strong argument either way.


Whoever told you that is very uneducated. How dare you say the Black Panthers were terrorists.

The KKK and the Black Panthers are totally and completely different in nearly every respect, apart from the racial flush of the members. The KKK oppressed the blacks because they believed themselves better than the blacks, white supremacist southerners and supporters of the old confederacy. The Black Panthers fought with violence against the whites who oppressed and held them down for so long.

It pisses me off when people make statements like that. Until the black panthers, blacks always took Martin Luther King's approach to protesting; completely non-violent... break the rules, sit in the white section of the bus, but take the punishment.

The Black Panthers did the same thing, they also sat in the white section of the bus when they wanted to make a stand. But the difference is that when they were told to leave, they kicked major ass.

The KKK were terrorists. The Black Panthers were not terrorists. They were rights activists.

I respect Malcom X more than any other living person of this century. He was an amazing man.
"The future's uncertain, and The End is always near."
-Jim Morrison
#28
Quote by SlinkyBlue
Whoever told you that is very uneducated. How dare you say the Black Panthers were terrorists.

The KKK and the Black Panthers are totally and completely different in nearly every respect, apart from the racial flush of the members. The KKK oppressed the blacks because they believed themselves better than the blacks, white supremacist southerners and supporters of the old confederacy. The Black Panthers fought with violence against the whites who oppressed and held them down for so long.

It pisses me off when people make statements like that. Until the black panthers, blacks always took Martin Luther King's approach to protesting; completely non-violent... break the rules, sit in the white section of the bus, but take the punishment.

The Black Panthers did the same thing, they also sat in the white section of the bus when they wanted to make a stand. But the difference is that when they were told to leave, they kicked major ass.

The KKK were terrorists. The Black Panthers were not terrorists. They were rights activists.

I respect Malcom X more than any other living person of this century. He was an amazing man.



+1

I don't support the Black Panthers, as I'm against violence, but there is no way in Hell you can call them the "Black KKK."
#30
Quote by crazygluedmybut
It was basically Malcolm X narrating it, but Alex Haley writing it all down.


That means it's an autobiography by Malcolm X, with Haley as a ghost writer. Duh.
Quote by DrewsGotTheLife
yea man, who ever doesnt like pantera or think they suck doesnt like metal, end of discussion, they changed the freakin world n made history, so don't be sayin they suck, have respect, same goes for machine head n lamb of god cuz their good too
#31
While I respect their militant stance I can't support them for their position on gender inequality. It seems so ludicrous that they would defy one type of oppression while maintaining and even increasing another. But, admittedly, that is only from the little bit I've heard about them. I met Elaine Brown, one of the founders and the only woman to lead the party, a few months ago. She was an impressive speaker and presented this disparity to which I refer.