#2
Loads of manufacturers use AWG 42, so I'd guess that 43 should be okay too. The world shouldn't end because of the difference in winds you can get with the two.. it can't be big.

Edit: 131,500 ft.. that's 25 miles. JESUS CHRIST, boy.
#3
well, i have 42awg heavy formvar and was told i wont get the output i'm looking for because it's too thick and i wont get enough winds on the bobbin (i wanted to shoot for 8-9k neck and 12k bridge) and i've seen 43awg being used for higher output with less winds im just curious if the insulation is correct for pup winding... i'm a complete newbie when it comes to anything related to guitar electronics I think i had to resolder a wire once... that's the extent of it
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#5
Quote by nuthinbuttrubl8
(i wanted to shoot for 8-9k neck and 12k bridge) and i've seen 43awg being used for higher output with less winds
You have this all confused. The resistance has little to do with the output. More turns gives you higher output. With the same size wire you will get more resistance per turn.


BUT

When you change to a smaller size, resistance will be misleading. You can have fewer turns with 43 gauge, yet still have higher resistance than a pick wound with 42 gauge.
The 43 gauge/fewer turns pickup will have lower output. Go by turns, not resistance.


Quote by nuthinbuttrubl8
im just curious if the insulation is correct for pup winding...
Who knows? I don't see anything about the type of insulation or the thickness. Both will affect the capacitance between the winding and the tone. That wire might be really good, or sorta crappy for winding a pickup.
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#6
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
You have this all confused. The resistance has little to do with the output. More turns gives you higher output. With the same size wire you will get more resistance per turn.


BUT

When you change to a smaller size, resistance will be misleading. You can have fewer turns with 43 gauge, yet still have higher resistance than a pick wound with 42 gauge.
The 43 gauge/fewer turns pickup will have lower output. Go by turns, not resistance.


Who knows? I don't see anything about the type of insulation or the thickness. Both will affect the capacitance between the winding and the tone. That wire might be really good, or sorta crappy for winding a pickup.


^ sure is a lot to stomach in one sitting

All I know is stewmac said:

"A 1/2-pound roll with over 25,000 feet of poly-coated pickup wire, sufficient for winding 5-6 single-coil pickups, or 2-3 humbuckers. 42-AWG (American Wire Gauge) is the standard wire used in humbuckers, Strat® pickups, and Tele® bridge pickups. 43-AWG is used at the Tele® neck position and in Rickenbacker pickups. 43-gauge wire requires fewer windings to attain a desired coil resistance"

so now i'm looking for the "right" type of wire to get the 12k output I want on my bridge pup...
Support your local luthier!

Timpson Guitars and TDM Pickups rock ;D

I make guitars and pickups. I also make sh*t that'll blow you the f*k up as well as things that will rebuild you - I have the technology
#7
Basically a smaller gauge wire has a higher resistance per the same number of feet as a wire of higher gauge. Basically at 43 awg i believe you will need about 5500 feet of wire to achieve a resistance of 12k ohms. About 4500 feet will make a resistance of 9k ohms. With 42 awg it would take 7500 feet of wire to achieve a resistance of 12k ohms. So you see the difference. Higher gauge has more resistance per foot. Lower gauge can carry more amps.