#1
i'm having a hard time deciding on what lead and rhythm tones i should use for the songs i write.

Rhythm = Lower
Lead = Higher

can i still have the Lead guitars with lots of low's and stuff? or could i just use the same tone for both?
Originally Posted by Death_switch
Why would anyone learn to read braille through sight? This reminds me of a vending machine I saw with braille on the buttons. I mean what's the point if you can't see what the buttons correspond with?
#2
your lead tone should be the same as your rhythm tone, except a little bit boosted. turn up the mids to cut through the mix, and maybe add more level and/or gain.
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#3
do whatever the hell you want to man. they are your songs
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#5
but shouldnt there be like more highs and stuff?
Originally Posted by Death_switch
Why would anyone learn to read braille through sight? This reminds me of a vending machine I saw with braille on the buttons. I mean what's the point if you can't see what the buttons correspond with?
#6
Rhythm = Lower
Lead = Higher

This could be volume as well as octave, or register.
This is a common arrangement in classical / orchestral music and vocals. The basic idea is to have the lead echo the basic rhythm one or more octaves higher.

With a three piece band, you everything about 2 octaves apart, playing the same rhythm in harmony.

Things can get much more interesting when you add a fourth instrument, although most often not in typical popular music, although there are exceptions.
Last edited by PRNDL at May 2, 2008,
#7
Quote by PRNDL
This could be volume as well as octave, or register.
This is a common arrangement in classical / orchestral music and vocals. The basic idea is to have the lead echo the basic rhythm one or more octaves higher.

With a three piece band, you everything about 2 octaves apart, playing the same rhythm in harmony.

Things can get much more interesting when you add a fourth instrument, although most often not.


....huh?
Originally Posted by Death_switch
Why would anyone learn to read braille through sight? This reminds me of a vending machine I saw with braille on the buttons. I mean what's the point if you can't see what the buttons correspond with?
#8
....huh?


Think about it ... the bass player is an octave below guitar, and in most cases plays the basic rhythm with the drums.

In a four piece band, you add a lead guitarist who usually plays an octave above the rhythm guitar (and two above the bass)..
#9
what are octaves?
lol
Originally Posted by Death_switch
Why would anyone learn to read braille through sight? This reminds me of a vending machine I saw with braille on the buttons. I mean what's the point if you can't see what the buttons correspond with?
#10
what are octaves?

The notes on a guitar are ABCDEFG, and repeat over and over, getting higher in frequency.
The span of ABCDEFG is one octave.

Here's an example.

The rhythm player uses 1st position chords near the neck ... let's say A, D and E (I IV and V chords).

The lead player can play the same chords on the fifth fret. That way they don't sound identical.

During leads, the lead guitarist can play notes on the twelfth fret, one octave above the 1st position chords.
Last edited by PRNDL at May 2, 2008,
#11
so how many frets apart is an octave?
Originally Posted by Death_switch
Why would anyone learn to read braille through sight? This reminds me of a vending machine I saw with braille on the buttons. I mean what's the point if you can't see what the buttons correspond with?
#12
Quote by valhallawaitsme
so how many frets apart is an octave?

12

On the same string, the 12th fret is one octave above the nut.

It's typical to have bass playing one octave below, and the lead playing one octave above the rhythm guitar.

That would be a simple harmony - octaves apart.
Some songs have harmony that is a fifth apart, which makes for much more interesting music.

You'll really have to study up on music theory to understand what that means, but it's worth the effort.
It may even be good to make a post asking for examples of rock songs with guitars parts in harmony.

Does anyone have a good example?
(The Mamas and the Papas come to mind, but that is vocal harmony)
Last edited by PRNDL at May 2, 2008,
#13
oh yeah, i forgot about that...

whats a common harmony then.
Originally Posted by Death_switch
Why would anyone learn to read braille through sight? This reminds me of a vending machine I saw with braille on the buttons. I mean what's the point if you can't see what the buttons correspond with?