#2
Thats pretty cool. I wonder how it works.

And i wonder how they setup that experiment. If it was laid straight on a speaker wouldnt it go allover the place.
#3
coolest thing I've seen all day.. for the most part anyway
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#5
What's interesting is that the higher the pitch, the more complex the pattern in the salt; I wonder why that happens.
#7
My god, awesome.
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#10
That was freaky cool.
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#11
My ears hurt, but that was awesome... I also half expected Rick Astley to come up right when the pitch was at it's highest.

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#15
OK, I can try and explain how it works (thanks to me taking physics) but it might be a little hard to explain and those of you who don't know anything about physics will probably not understand it.

Here goes:

Ok, first off, you need to know that the reason sound is created is because waves are emitted from a speaker. These waves will cause the top of that surface to vibrate and thus, the salt will vibrate. More specifically, sound is emitted in the form of a standing wave (I am not going to try and explain what they are, so I have enlisted the help of wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standing_wave ).
Ok, so, a standing wave has points called nodes, and points called anti nodes. The anti nodes are parts of maximum amplitude from the central point, a node is the exact oposite, it is a point where there is no displacement from the mean point (basically, there are no vibrations at these points). When a piece of salt is resting on an anti-node it will be shaken around so much that it will move to another point (a node) where there is no vibration. So all the points that you see on the speaker with salt on them are simply the points where there is no vibration (the nodes). As you move up the pitch the nodes and anti nodes move around causing the shape to change.

Sorry if that's hard to explain, I'm not the best teacher.
#18
Quote by blynd_snyper
OK, I can try and explain how it works (thanks to me taking physics) but it might be a little hard to explain and those of you who don't know anything about physics will probably not understand it.

Here goes:

Ok, first off, you need to know that the reason sound is created is because waves are emitted from a speaker. These waves will cause the top of that surface to vibrate and thus, the salt will vibrate. More specifically, sound is emitted in the form of a standing wave (I am not going to try and explain what they are, so I have enlisted the help of wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standing_wave ).
Ok, so, a standing wave has points called nodes, and points called anti nodes. The anti nodes are parts of maximum amplitude from the central point, a node is the exact oposite, it is a point where there is no displacement from the mean point (basically, there are no vibrations at these points). When a piece of salt is resting on an anti-node it will be shaken around so much that it will move to another point (a node) where there is no vibration. So all the points that you see on the speaker with salt on them are simply the points where there is no vibration (the nodes). As you move up the pitch the nodes and anti nodes move around causing the shape to change.

Sorry if that's hard to explain, I'm not the best teacher.

Very interesting, so that's why the patterns got smaller? The wavelength was shortening?
#19
Quote by Shred Head
Very interesting, so that's why the patterns got smaller? The wavelength was shortening?

Yeah. It's slightly more complicated than that, but basically, that's it. You see, when you play an open string on a guitar, you have a node at each end (bridge and nut) and an anti-node in the middle. When you play a harmonic on the 12th fret you create a forced node there which means you have 3 nodes (bridge, 12th fret, nut) and two anti nodes (half way between 12th fret and bridge, halfway between 12th fret and nut). So you are effectively halving the wavelength and doubling the frequency.

Now, when you relate that to the vibrating table, when they half the wavelength and double the frequency, they get double the amount of anti nodes and thus, smaller patterns.
#21
Ya know what? that is REAAAAAALLLY trippy and the koolest thing ive seen today...(its onle 7:23 in the morning where i am XD) but im going to canadas wonderland....so i think the new behemoth will outshine it ;p srry!