#2
It's a device used to regulate the amount of moisture in the air.
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#3
^^ Yup

It prevents the woods on your acoustic from drying out, which leads to cracking and warping.
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#4
Quote by Dr LeBrun
It's a device used to regulate the amount of moisture in the air.


Actually, it's a device used to ADD moisture(humidity) to the air, not regulate it. That implies the act of de-humidifying the air as well, which a humidifier can't do. As for guitars, there is a device, if they ever perfect it, from Planet Waves called the "HumidiPak" which is able to work both ways. I had it briefly, but they had a recall on it due to a defect in packaging which could allow the product to leak out, possibly damaging the guitar. Still waiting for the replacement to arrive.
Simple rule of thumb, maintain the main climate that the guitar is stored in(inside the case or the room itself) at approx. 40-50% rH(relative humidity) and 70 degrees F temperature. If that means adding moisture to the air in the winter, and taking it out in the summer, so be it. If you go with an in case type of humidifier, be sure that you can monitor it also. It's easy to overdo it by adding too much moisture to the wood, which is no good. Same goes for if you are trying to dry out the air by removing moisture, such as in the summer months.
#5
Sounds like a lot to think about. I usually just leave my guitar in the living room or anywhere really, its a cheapo. How necessary is this humidifier? Do most guitarist really use these to keep there guitars from cracking or would I be fine just by keeping my guitar from too warm or cold temperatures?
#6
Quote by LeftyDave
Actually, it's a device used to ADD moisture(humidity) to the air, not regulate it. That implies the act of de-humidifying the air as well, which a humidifier can't do. As for guitars, there is a device, if they ever perfect it, from Planet Waves called the "HumidiPak" which is able to work both ways. I had it briefly, but they had a recall on it due to a defect in packaging which could allow the product to leak out, possibly damaging the guitar. Still waiting for the replacement to arrive.
Simple rule of thumb, maintain the main climate that the guitar is stored in(inside the case or the room itself) at approx. 40-50% rH(relative humidity) and 70 degrees F temperature. If that means adding moisture to the air in the winter, and taking it out in the summer, so be it. If you go with an in case type of humidifier, be sure that you can monitor it also. It's easy to overdo it by adding too much moisture to the wood, which is no good. Same goes for if you are trying to dry out the air by removing moisture, such as in the summer months.


If you don't keep your guitar humid/moist, what eventually happens? Something bad I suppose?
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#7
How necessary is this humidifier?


Depends on the climate you live in and the natural humidity levels of the environment where your guitar is kept.

If you don't keep your guitar humid/moist, what eventually happens? Something bad I suppose?


When wood loses moisture it shrinks. If you guitar is subjected to low humidity levels for an extended period of time the following symptoms will show.

Action will lower and fret buzz is very likely.
Soundboard and back will become flat and possibly even concave which may lead to cracking.
Fret ends will feel sharp due to the wood of the fingerboard shrinking.
#8
^^^ He speaks truth. And remember also folks, the 45-50% humidity level in your house is good for you too, not only the guitar. People feel more comfortable in this range than if it's too dry or too humid. Same goes with temp. 70 degrees F is a very comfy temp for people and guitars. As for if most guitarists use humidifiers? I can't really say, but if they have expensive instruments, they certainly should be doing something to maintain the proper moisture content of their guitars. The obvious main benefit of all this is that the guitar will stay in good shape for a long time. But another important one is it will be stable. As temp/humidity fluctuates, so does the physical size of the guitar. When this happens, your tuning goes right out the window. These changes are small granted, but more than enough to keep you on your toes re-tuning, performing set-ups more often, and so on.
If it's a cheap guitar, just keeping it from any harsh environment should be enough to keep it playable.
#9
Some good advice above. Usually a guitar kept in a too humid environment will warp. In a too dry environment it will shrink and crack. Air conditioning and central heating both cause unnatural dryness. That's when you should be especially concerned. Keeping your guitar in it's case may help maintain it's humidity. I don't use a guitar humidifier, but I do try to maintain humidity in my home in the winter when the heat's on. A room humidifier or vaporizer is just as effective (although may be less precise) and will also benefit your own well-being. I also can leave the guitar on a stand ready for me to play. Severe fluctuations in temperature can cause finish cracks ESPECIALLY with nitro-cellulose finishes. It is best to keep the guitar in its case until it has a chance to slowly come to room temperature.