#1
i've got this pretty cool, progressive style progression, but i'm not totally sure what sale(s) i should use to solo over it.

|----x---------x---------x---------x----------|
|----x---------x---------x---------2----------|
|---11--------6---------7---------x----------|
|----9---------4---------7---------4----------|
|----7---------5---------5---------4----------|
|----0---------7---------3---------2----------|

Esus2 Bmadd9 Gsus2 F#5

those are the chords (with other rhythm of course).
please help
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#3
Quote by bangoodcharlote
If you consider E the root, use E Dorian. If you consider B the root, use B natural minor.

i was planning on using E as the root. so i guess i'll use Dorian. Thanks
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#4
Quote by slashNpage77
i was planning on using E as the root. so i guess i'll use Dorian. Thanks
Don't feel compelled to write the whole thing using E Dorian. Throwing in a C# to make the F# chord not have a diminished 5th is very common. if you're going for something progressive, you'll likely end up writing your next progression in E natural minor and/or E Harmonic Minor.
#5
Quote by slashNpage77
i was planning on using E as the root. so i guess i'll use Dorian. Thanks


The progression will resolve to one or the other regardless of what you want. It you want it to resolve elsewhere, change the progression.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#6
God love Archeo...thanks Arch...you taught me more than you could ever imagine <3
Quote by metal4all
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Quote by steven seagull
Big deal, I bought a hamster once and they put that in a box...doesn't make it a scale.
#7
Quote by Archeo Avis
The progression will resolve to one or the other regardless of what you want. It you want it to resolve elsewhere, change the progression.
I could see it going to E or B. B is stronger IMMHOHO, but E could work.
#8
Quote by bangoodcharlote
If you consider E the root, use E Dorian. If you consider B the root, use B natural minor.
Dorians not really a scale. Modes arent scales. If you wanted a scale, in its exact meaning, you would be asking for B minor. Bminor would sound best over that imo.

If you did play a dorian "shape" over that progression, you would be playing E dorian over the Esus2 chord, B aeolian over the Bmadd9 chord, G lydian over the Gsus2 chord and F phrygian over the F5 chord. Modes change with the root of the chord playing underneath.

Modes are a group of intervals that respond harmonically with the root. If you see modes as "scales," and played only one mode "shape" over that progression, you might as well play the B minor/Dmajor shape to keep it simple.

TL;DR not E dorian, B minor
#9
If you wanted a scale, in its exact meaning, you would be asking for B minor.
If your point is that a scale is a group of notes, why not D major?

If you did play a dorian "shape" over that progression, you would be playing E dorian over the Esus2 chord, B aeolian over the Bmadd9 chord, G lydian over the Gsus2 chord and F phrygian over the F5 chord. Modes change with the root of the chord playing underneath
That depends on how you play

Modes are a group of intervals that respond harmonically with the root. If you see modes as "scales," and played only one mode "shape" over that progression, you might as well play the B minor/Dmajor shape to keep it simple.
What do you mean?
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Quote by MudMartin
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Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
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#10
I could see it going to E or B. B is stronger IMMHOHO, but E could work.
Thats funny because I definately hear E as the stronger chord.

Oh and sorry for the double post, the internet usually implodes if I use anything other than quick reply.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#11
Quote by Aenimus Prime
If your point is that a scale is a group of notes, why not D major?
See this \\//
Quote by demonofthenight
you might as well play the B minor/Dmajor shape to keep it simple.
Quote by Aenimus Prime
That depends on how you play
Sort of, but not really. If your describing modes, they will change with the root of the chord playing.
Quote by Aenimus Prime
What do you mean?
Some people see modes as scales. They than play a box shape called "E dorian" over a whole progression and then think that they have played the E dorian mode over that whole progression. This is wrong, as modes are intervals that respond harmonically with the root of a chord (I'll explain this too) and as the root of that chord changes so do the modes.

A modes is not a scale, as a scale by definition is JUST a group of notes. So the scale DEFGABC is exactly the same as CDEFGAB, as they contain the same notes. Modes are a group of interval from one point (the root). What distinguishes one mode from another is not the notes used, or the supposed note you start on if you were to order the notes, but their intervals.
So from the root (E in this case), the dorian mode is M2, m3, p4, p5, M6, m7 and 8ve (or octave) OR 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7. These intervals can point to the notes, DEFGABC, but the purpose of the modes is to explain what these intervals used together will sound like over the chord/arpeggio/bassline/riff playing under it.
#13
Quote by branny1982
Demon, i, along with countless others, have said this before.... but take in just 2 words -
TONAL CENTRE
You mean for a whole song or just for the chord playing?
#15
Quote by branny1982
you can't just break it down to each chord if the tonal centre hasn't changed.
Why not? If you drone a B over a D minor chord and than over a E minor chord, it wont sound the same, right? B over D minor makes a Major sixth, which is usually dissonant. But B over an E minor chord makes a perfect fifth which is consonant.

Sure it would be nice to pick a 1 or 2 scales and follow them to the end, but I'm suggesting what I believe is a better way. I dont like being restricted to 7 notes when I can use 12.
#16
Why not? If you drone a B over a D minor chord and than over a E minor chord, it wont sound the same, right? B over D minor makes a Major sixth, which is usually dissonant. But B over an E minor chord makes a perfect fifth which is consonant.
Yeah but there's also the moon and the stars and gravity and whatnot. Did you read that post of mine a while back? I don't want to try to find it again.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#17
Ænimus, my browser crashes a lot when I don't use Quick Reply as well. Anyone know what's up?

Quote by demonofthenight
A modes is not a scale, as a scale by definition is JUST a group of notes. So the scale DEFGABC is exactly the same as CDEFGAB, as they contain the same notes. Modes are a group of interval from one point (the root). What distinguishes one mode from another is not the notes used, or the supposed note you start on if you were to order the notes, but their intervals.
So from the root (E in this case), the dorian mode is M2, m3, p4, p5, M6, m7 and 8ve (or octave) OR 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7. These intervals can point to the notes, DEFGABC, but the purpose of the modes is to explain what these intervals used together will sound like over the chord/arpeggio/bassline/riff playing under it.
This is completely wrong and I'm very surprised that you said it. Were you drunk/high last night?


(That would totally prove my theory about drugs!!)

By the thinking in that post, there is no Am scale, just the C major scale over an Am chord, and that's just ridiculous.

Moreover, when you play a scale over a chord progression, you don't have to discuss how the scale related to each chord. Over an Am G F E7 progression, it is fine to say, "Play A Natural Minor" over Am, G, and F. You don't have to say, "Play A Natural Minor over Am, G Mixolydian over G, and F Lydian over F." It's in unnecessary step that only confises people.

In fact, when you have a key-based piece of music, you SHOULD refer to each scale by the note name of the key. So when you play that G# over E7, you should call it A Harminic Minor rather than E Phrygian Dominant.
#19
E hungarian gypsy minor?
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#21
Quote by damm_punks
E hungarian gypsy minor?

i think that sounds like the best choice by far
____________________ ___________________
..............................................I have epic fail.........................................


#22
Quote by demonofthenight
See this \\// Sort of, but not really. If your describing modes, they will change with the root of the chord playing. Some people see modes as scales. They than play a box shape called "E dorian" over a whole progression and then think that they have played the E dorian mode over that whole progression. This is wrong, as modes are intervals that respond harmonically with the root of a chord (I'll explain this too) and as the root of that chord changes so do the modes.

A modes is not a scale, as a scale by definition is JUST a group of notes. So the scale DEFGABC is exactly the same as CDEFGAB, as they contain the same notes. Modes are a group of interval from one point (the root). What distinguishes one mode from another is not the notes used, or the supposed note you start on if you were to order the notes, but their intervals.
So from the root (E in this case), the dorian mode is M2, m3, p4, p5, M6, m7 and 8ve (or octave) OR 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7. These intervals can point to the notes, DEFGABC, but the purpose of the modes is to explain what these intervals used together will sound like over the chord/arpeggio/bassline/riff playing under it.


May I have an attempt at summarising what modes are in one line. If possible.

"Modes are inversions of scales, just the same way that chords and triads have their inversions".

Imo, it makes sense to use E Dorian cos Slash N (whatever's) chord progression highlights all the intervals that are characteristic of E Dorian sound, namely the G (b3), the C# (maj 6), and D (b7).