#1
I just got my friend to restring my guitar with D'addario medium gauge phospher bronze strings, and I don't think he did a good job of it. The treble strings (GBE) are fine, but the bass strings (EAD) strings are rattling excessively, especially the D string. My old (stock) strings were so much better, I shouldn't have changed them at all. Now my guitar sounds really bad. How do I fix this buzzing problem?
#3
your guitar probally needs to be set up that's all just get your guitar store to adjust the truss rod
#4
did you chage the string gage? if so you may need a set up.
Im gonna pistol whip the next guy that says shenanigans !!!!
#5
This seems to happen a bit on all new strings I put on my guitar. Then they're fine after playing them in. Only worry if the problem doesn't go away.
#7
How much would a set up cost? Also, How long will it take to "go away" as lead ninja mentioned?
#8
Try clipping the string ends. They'll buzz if they hit things when you're playing.

Gear:
Partscaster/Tele into a bunch of pedals, a Maz 18 head, and a Z Best cab.
#10
Your windings are very . . . interesting. You should have about a 3 layer wrap of the string around the post when you bring it up to tune. This is for reasons of tension and tuning (makes fine tuning MUCH easier).

There are many solutions to this problem. Clip the string ends, check to make sure they are the same gauge (if not, don't worry), play them in for a few days, then report back.

Edit: also, medium gauge is somewhat thick, as most manufacturers ship with light gauge strings. This could account for the change. Either way, don't worry about it. If the neck doesn't adjust itself to the current conditions, a simple setup will.
Sincerely, Chad.
Quote by LP Addict
LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.
Last edited by Chad48309 at May 3, 2008,
#11
Quote by Opethfan1
did you chage the string gage? if so you may need a set up.


For the TS, the same thing happened on my last guitar purchase. I changed the strings to a lighter gage than what the guitar came with, and the bass strings were buzzing like crazy. Since the guitar was set up with the original string gage in mind, the drop in the tension from the lighter-gage strings caused a slight "bow" in the neck. On the other hand, if you change the strings to a heavier gage, then the neck will "warp." Either way, the neck can be excessively bent out of shape and will need adjustment.

As far as adjusting the truss rod, you can take it to a shop and have it done professionally. You can do it on your own if you know what you're doing, but only do so if you're absolutely comfortable with it.
#12
Quote by TokyoNeko
For the TS, the same thing happened on my last guitar purchase. I changed the strings to a lighter gage than what the guitar came with, and the bass strings were buzzing like crazy. Since the guitar was set up with the original string gage in mind, the drop in the tension from the lighter-gage strings caused a slight "bow" in the neck. On the other hand, if you change the strings to a heavier gage, then the neck will "warp." Either way, the neck can be excessively bent out of shape and will need adjustment.

As far as adjusting the truss rod, you can take it to a shop and have it done professionally. You can do it on your own if you know what you're doing, but only do so if you're absolutely comfortable with it.


I think my original strings were a bit heavier, but the ones I got a quite heavy as well. As for the windings...I think he got lazy, and did a half assed job of it. My strings are going out of tune quiet frequently now. Before I used to be able to play for weeks before i had to tune.
#13
Quote by killatm
I think my original strings were a bit heavier, but the ones I got a quite heavy as well. As for the windings...I think he got lazy, and did a half assed job of it. My strings are going out of tune quiet frequently now. Before I used to be able to play for weeks before i had to tune.

You might want to learn how to restring it yourself. Because there is such a fine line between tension and slack on the sparse winding, the slightest adjustment will push it to being either in or out of tune. With many windings (three is normal), this will not happen.
Sincerely, Chad.
Quote by LP Addict
LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.
#14
Quote by killatm
I think my original strings were a bit heavier, but the ones I got a quite heavy as well. As for the windings...I think he got lazy, and did a half assed job of it. My strings are going out of tune quiet frequently now. Before I used to be able to play for weeks before i had to tune.


You have to remember that guitars are very sensitive instruments. The slightest changes in the string tensions can do affect the neck position and consequently the string behavior. Likewise, the slightest tweaking of the truss rod can either alleviate or exacerbate the symptoms. These things may not be obvious from the naked eyes, but they do make a difference.
#15
Quote by killatm
Also, in the third picture if you notice, some strings have an extra layer sticking out near the white pegs. It wasn't like that before. Does that affect anything?

That has nothing to do with anything, it's just the end wrap.

However your friend needs lessons in how to string a guitar. He's done an appalling job of it, but I don't think the buzzing has anything to do with that. In my experience this is what happens if you put lighter strings on and attempt to lower the action at the same time.

Lighter strings require more room to vibrate but if you don't adjust the truss rod when putting them on the neck flexes back and reduces arc relief. If you then also lower the action at the saddle it's a recipe for fret buzz. You really can't play fast and loose with your string gauges.
Last edited by octavedoctor at May 12, 2008,
#16
Quick fix is to put the same gauge strings that were on it back again. And it probably had "Acoustic strings" and now your using "acoustic electrics" in a lighter gauge and that will make a big difference especially if they were really nice stock strings.

Also if you tune to drop d or Eb your gonna notice the buzz even more. Make sure your tuned up to pitch in standard tuning and if it still buzzes give them a few days to stretch out and settle down and if it don't go away then "maybe" somethings wrong. If you always want to play with lighter strings then you may want to get it adjusted and set up again if it is set up for heavy strings now.

Many people like medium to light gauge acoustic/electrics so they can bend the strings on their acoustic which is fine, but they may vibrate more in a lighter gauge and with close action that might buzz. Besides, you will lose some of the great acoustic tone if you step down too much in gauge anyway.

On one of my guitars I have medium gauge strings with a slightly heavier low E string just to get rid of the buzz cuz it only does it on the E string and I like the lighter strings to bend and the difference doesn't bother me at all.
~JP~
#17
Octavedoctor and Jammy, you two had better do your homework before posting again.
Lighter gauge strings do NOT vibrate more than heavier gauge, they vibrate in a smaller arc. It's actually an elliptical shape which strings vibrate in. Lighter gauge strings have less tension and are generally easier to play on than heavier gauges are. Take a look at an acoustic strung with .012's versus an electric strung with .009's. Look particularly at the action of the two. Which is closer? The electric strings have a lower action because the strings vibrate in a SMALLER pattern than the heavier strings of the acoustic.
Killatm, try restringing it with a set of lights, .012's, and see if it doesn't remedy itself. This is the middle of the road gauge for acoustics and is a good starting point when trying to fix problems like this. The D'Addario Phosphor Bronze EJ16's should be just right. Learn how to do the job yourself. It's not very difficult and it's rewarding in it's own right. There are many walkthroughs on the internet to teach you how to restring an acoustic. Either way, don't let your friend do it again as he obviously doesn't know how to do it properly. There should be 3-4 wraps on each tuning post. One above the hole that the string goes through, and 2-3 below it. The first top wrap above the hole is to lock the string in place, and does this by crossing over itself before wrapping around the post below the hole. This is critical and MUST be done right or your tuning stability will suffer, which is the problem your having. The other, string buzz, could be from the left over excess string left hanging around. Cut it off close to the tuning post, about 1/4 inch away. The other reason for buzzing is the fact that you put on too heavy of strings and the guitar isn't setup for them. Like I said eariler, heavier gauge strings need MORE room to vibrate, so the neck needs more relief. This means a truss rod adjustment. See what I mean about trying a set of lights?

Here's a site link to information on restringing a steel string acoustic. I suggest you read through it and do the job yourself.
http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Musician/Guitar/Setup/SteelStrings/Stringing/ststringing1.html
Last edited by LeftyDave at May 13, 2008,
#18
i was always under the impression that more string tensoin= a less movement with all other factors being equal unless my physics teacher was all wrong(doubt it).
my personal experience is that my treble strings buzz with .012 and that problem was remedied instantly with .013 gauge this may be because of the way the strings contact the nut slots or the slightly more neck relief the extra tensoin gives me. I made no further adjustments other than string gauge.
#19
Look, I'm not trying to be technical and I'm going by experience rather than something I read. The bottom line is the strings that my acoustic guitar came with were heavier than the one's I replaced them with and the ones I replaced them with made my guitar buzz on the the lower strings "just like his." I don't care if technically i should have said that "they buzzed more but they don't actually vibrate more because yadayadayada."

All I wanted to do was let him know that I experienced the same problem and putting heavy gauges back on solved the problem. While some people would rather have him tear into his guitar and adjust the frkn neck just because the strings were buzzing does NOT mean the neck needs to be adjusted necessarily and I stand by that..

He had heavier stock strings that played perfect, he went to medium gauge and that made the guitar buzz and now you want him to put on light gauge strings. . . Brilliant.

I am certain that the way that guitar is strung it will go out of tune right away and it will get looser and the looser the string is the more it will buzz. Restring it and tune it to pitch in standard tuning and give the strings a chance to stretch out and see if it still buzzes.

If mediums make it buzz, a heavier string (like the ones it had) will make the buzz go away. But if you have to have a lighter gauge, then restring with a lighter gauge the right way (wrap around 2-3 times to allow the string to stretch tighten and it will hold tune) and tune it to pitch in standard tuning and give it a few days and see how it sounds. If the buzz don't go away and you must use light gauge strings then take it down and get it adjusted and set up again. More than anything, learn by experience and string it yourself so you don't have to go through all this bs that people like us put you through trying to help.

FYI: If you don't believe me read "While on the subject of buzz" the 4th paragraph. Peace.
While on the subject of buzz
~JP~
Last edited by Jammy Pige at May 14, 2008,