#1
Sorry if this has already been answered but I've heard alot of artists start off with a 4 Track recording studio and I was wondering what it is exactly. I'm interested in recording music and I have no idea where to get started on this so here's a few questions:
What is a 4 track?
What is the quality of a 4 track? (I'm not looking to produce music or anything, I just want to record a few tracks for my own listening enjoyment and maybe a few close friends.)
Can I alter recordings?
Can I somehow upload my recordings onto a computer?
What kind of price would I be looking at for a decent one?
and finally, any suggestions on where to find a 4 track or what brands to look for?
Input would be greatly appreciated. Thanks for helping out a newbie
#2
Well, what exactly are you going to record?

You shouldn't get a 4 track just because people say it's a good idea. You may have a better use of your money buying interfaces and using your computer directly or have better quality with a high quality two track.

1. Four track = can take four inputs (or two stereo) tracks at once.
2. Quality depends wildly.
3. Not too well. Even the digital ones.
4. If you just get an interface, you upload from the first step and save yourself time and save yourself from additional audio conversions (meaning a better sound).
5. I won't speculate, since I first have to figure out your needs (you and your friends isn't enough...are there drummers? guitarists?)
6. Fostex, Zoom, Boss (especially) are all top brands.
Quote by keiron_d
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Recording Guitar Amps 101
#3
Thanks for the information, maybe I will try out that interface thing you mentioned. where can I find more information on that? Also I was only planning to record a single acoustic guitar maybe with vocals. I also wanted to record some electric with a digital delay pedal that serves as a makeshift loop station for now.
#4
Quote by TabooTapeworm
Thanks for the information, maybe I will try out that interface thing you mentioned. where can I find more information on that? Also I was only planning to record a single acoustic guitar maybe with vocals. I also wanted to record some electric with a digital delay pedal that serves as a makeshift loop station for now.


Oh, you could go basic and not have any problems. Here's a TASCAM US-122L, $200, with two microphone preamps (if you plan on singing while playing), a good pair of headphones, and cables.

It has line inputs so you can stick your guitar delay pedal in there. If it sounds weak, you can stick it to the 2nd line in and select guitar (to match levels). Then decide on microphone(s). M Audio Novas (warm sounding), Studio Projects B1s, Samson CO3s (which is very versatile), and Sterling Audio ST51s are highly rated $99 large diaphragm condensers. These give a really nice sensitivity and wide response, and complement acoustics and voices well.

An alternative (which should help performance in your software, and allow you to use a light version of Pro Tools) is getting this package and the M-Audio Delta 44, a sound card. You'll need two TRS-TRS and XLR cables to connect the microphones to the preamp and the preamp to the sound card. It'll be about 250 total.
Quote by keiron_d
thank you sooooooo much for the advice Fast_Fingers...i would hug you if i could...i looooove you!


True love exists in UG. Can you feel it?

Recording Guitar Amps 101
Last edited by Fast_Fingers at May 4, 2008,