#1
Hi everyone,

I've not been participating in these forums for very long yet, but I've come across a couple of threads where the term fret buzz was mentioned. I've bought a new Tanglewood TW115 a few days back, and there's something wrong with my low E string that might fall under this category so... Occasionally when I pluck it, or during strumming, it sounds like it's rattling against something, a sort of can-sound, if that makes any sense. It's like the buzz when you touch a string that's ringing, just.. more intense. I figured I was playing it wrong (since I'm still a beginner), but I'm fairly sure everything's right. It's not my nail striking it or anything, it happens when strumming too, and my dad gets the same thing when playing on it (took me a while to convince him something was wrong though).

I've looked at the guitar extensively, and I've come to a couple of conclusions. Now, forgive me for using incorrect terminology, feel free to correct me so I'll learn..

- I considered it might be something in the case that's trembling, like the electronics wiring vibrating on the sound of the string, but it doesn't happen with any of the other strings, so I doubt this is it.

- Second I saw that the low E string, as only of the 6, has a little dent in the copper (metal?) coating where it goes into the case (case is probably not the right word either lol). Maybe something's messed up there, or if not precisely, it's at least related to the white..bridge..thingy (I gotta do a crash course in terms, any online lexicon for that? ) I think.

In the end I'm fairly certain it's the string itself, and not the guitar. Can anyone help or confirm (and is this what you call fret buzz)?

Thanks!
#2
Well the white bridge thingy is a saddle, it's used for adjusting string height/action.

It make be too low and causing the fret buzz.
Your truss might be loose and vibrating at on a certain note or frequency like my acoustic does.
You might have not have enough relief in the truss rod and the neck may be bowed back slighty.


And by 'case' do you mean the body of the guitar?
Quote by demoniacfashion
Is there any black people on UG?
I don't think a lot of black people play guitar anymore.

Quote by Oasis-fanatic
they all kinda went extinct after hendrix really.


Needless to say, I lol'ed.

Quote by human panda
Appart from being on UG or wanking, thats what i mostly do
#3
Quote by Kingyem0c0re
Well the white bridge thingy is a saddle, it's used for adjusting string height/action.

It make be too low and causing the fret buzz.
Your truss might be loose and vibrating at on a certain note or frequency like my acoustic does.
You might have not have enough relief in the truss rod and the neck may be bowed back slighty.


And by 'case' do you mean the body of the guitar?


Body, that's the word! Truss rod would be the round ball thingy where the string goes in? Sorry for sounding like a total newb here but.. well I guess English not being my first language doesn't really help either.

Is this fixable? Sure do hope so, given the fact I've only just bought the guitar...
#4
Quote by Azunaii
Body, that's the word! Truss rod would be the round ball thingy where the string goes in? Sorry for sounding like a total newb here but.. well I guess English not being my first language doesn't really help either.

Is this fixable? Sure do hope so, given the fact I've only just bought the guitar...

Right, where the strings go in is the bridge, the 'white thingy' is the Saddle.
If your not a competent person at this, you really should take it back to where you bought it and get it fixed for free under warranty.

Edit:
http://www.4electricguitar.com/images/guitar/Acoustic-Guitar-Parts.jpg
http://user156177.websitewizard.com/images/acoustic_guitar_parts.png
http://www.moviesmusicgamesandmore.com/acoustic-guitar-parts.gif
Quote by demoniacfashion
Is there any black people on UG?
I don't think a lot of black people play guitar anymore.

Quote by Oasis-fanatic
they all kinda went extinct after hendrix really.


Needless to say, I lol'ed.

Quote by human panda
Appart from being on UG or wanking, thats what i mostly do
Last edited by Kingyem0c0re at May 3, 2008,
#5
Quote by Kingyem0c0re
Right, where the strings go in is the bridge, the 'white thingy' is the Saddle.
If your not a competent person at this, you really should take it back to where you bought it and get it fixed for free under warranty.


That's what I was figuring yeah. Motivation or general guitar competence isn't lacking, but I'm not the person who would confidently fiddle around with their guitar other than playing indeed. I was just wondering if anyone here knew straight from the top of their heads what's going on and wether it's something easily fixed, f. ex. putting on a new string (which I would then have the dealer do).

As for what I meant with the whole bridge, saddle, truss rod thing.. I was wondering if you were referring to those black ball thingies on this picture when you said truss rod, is all. So, just for the record, brown wooden thing is the bridge, white is the saddle, and then the balls would be.. ? Thanks for the information though

EDIT: Never mind, gonna go through this a couple of times
Last edited by Azunaii at May 3, 2008,
#6
Check my edited post above.

Those in the picture you listed are called Bridge Pin's.

A Truss Rod is an adustable rod down the neck of the guitar that can go loose if left to long with out maintenance or adjustment.
It might also resonate at a certain frequency.


Edit:
Also, don't use that guide completely, it's for a classical guitar, not an acoustic/dreadnought.
Quote by demoniacfashion
Is there any black people on UG?
I don't think a lot of black people play guitar anymore.

Quote by Oasis-fanatic
they all kinda went extinct after hendrix really.


Needless to say, I lol'ed.

Quote by human panda
Appart from being on UG or wanking, thats what i mostly do
Last edited by Kingyem0c0re at May 3, 2008,
#7
Thanks, feeling really dumb now ^^ But luckily I already knew most parts Gonna drop by the dealer this week, see if they have anything they can do about it. Else there's always warranty.