#1
Hey dudes i leave quite a lot of threads asking for help, but bare with me

Anyway, extending chords, how do you know which notes to use to extend a chord, like, i know with the major scale you sort of continue the 'leap-frog' thing....i think

like say the bracketed notes are the ones that you miss out:

1 (2) 3 (4) 5 (6) 7 (8) 9, would that be a Maj9 or summin?

and with other chords, how do you know which notes to use?


and finally (this is a lot sorry :P) how do you know which extended chords to use over which scale, like people say "Oh this mode is good with Minor 7ths" or w.e.


thanks for reading what appears to be a small novel and thanks in advance for the help dudes
#2
Quote by synysterA7Xrule

1 (2) 3 (4) 5 (6) 7 (8) 9, would that be a Maj9 or summin?

and with other chords, how do you know which notes to use?


and finally (this is a lot sorry :P) how do you know which extended chords to use over which scale, like people say "Oh this mode is good with Minor 7ths" or w.e.



Yeah, that's right Maj9. "leap-frog" is actually called (diatonic) 3rds, so you'd just
keep going to the 11th and 13th. Then you're basically done because a 13th chord
is every note in the scale. Of course, in practice, seldom are all the notes played
(and it's impossible to on guitar to play a full 13th). So, you tend to use the
primary notes that define it (like the 3, 7 and 13) and add others for color.


As to the last question, there's really no simple answer to that. A lot is just
how you want it to sound.
#3
You're right on the dot with the leap-frogging, and as edg said, it's thirds.

Anyway, as to what sounds good where. Having all the notes in key or out of key in a way you can "justify" is about it. Matter of personal taste and it'll take a lot of experimenting. Uh, I'll just say...throwing a 9th on top of anything that has a major 9th generally sounds nice.
#4
ooo thanks dudes

but when you come to a minor chord, how do you extend that? like cus it doesnt follow the 'leap-frog' thing the same way cus of the b3 (flat 3rd in case that isnt clear), how do you go bout doing that?

same with the other chords like augmented and diminished, once again thanks for the help dudes!!!
#6
Quote by synysterA7Xrule

but when you come to a minor chord, how do you extend that? like cus it doesnt follow the 'leap-frog' thing the same way cus of the b3 (flat 3rd in case that isnt clear), how do you go bout doing that?


Actually it does follow the same formula, but it just uses a different scale basis.
For minor chords, you could use the minor scale as a basis.
Dimished, diminished scale
Augmented, whole tone scale

You can also use any of the major scale modes and melodic & harmonic minor modes
to produce chords with various harmonic characteristics using the "leap-frog"
process....
#7
the 'leap-frog' thing the same way cus of the b3 (flat 3rd in case that isnt clear)


Chords are built by stacking thirds, and b3 signifies a minor third (as opposed to a major third)
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
Notice there's no 10th or 12th.

If you look up the interval terms it'll help you understand a little better.

For min chords it's b3 right off the bat.

Saying maj3 is like saying perfect4 or perfect5.

anywho...it's like saying play the note as it's natural posistion...not flat or sharp

For the 5th note...you'll to have say diminish5th for a b5...to be politically correct.lmao

you're still leap frogging but you're wraping the pitch. The terms used tell you
which way to wrap, down pitch , up pitch, or play it as it's natual posistion

The reason you do that is becuase it would be wicked as heck to see
key signature in # and b for the same song, in the same measure

What also helps me to know why..I would need to use a b7 for a minor chord
to stay within the same key is...
If I look at the postions of these chords...they all have 1 whole step back
for 7th note of the root or octive when I play their modes.
The II,III,VI chords.

The natural position of the 7th note in a diatonic (major)scale is 1/2 step back.


why dose it have to be a b3 for the II,III,VI chords ??
In the key of C...when leap froging.
1, b3,5

D to F is 1 1/2 step
E to G is 1 1/2 step
A to C is 1 1/2 step

If I wanted to extend a 9th note for the III chord.
Most likely it would be a b9...becuase there a 1/2 step between the III and IV chord.
9 is the same as 2.
A whole step between 1 and 2
Last edited by Ordinary at May 5, 2008,
#9
ok dudes! thanks, just to clarify, you use diatonic 3rds or leap-frogging as i so childishly put it, and you continue this, you use this on the scale you want to get the right chord...

so

major 7 would be

1 (2) 3 (4) 5 (6) 7

and would a minor 7 be...

1 (2) b3 (4) 5 (6) b7?

cus the minor scale is

1,2,b3,4,5,6,b7 ( i think)

#10
You got it.

In the key of C..the V chord G..it woud be G7 and not Gmaj7.

The reason is becuase there's whole step between 4 and 5. (F and G)
So...you have to play a b7 to stay in the same key.
If you play a Gmaj7, then the it would be a F#

Becuase you basically put the the G in the 1 posistion when you write
1,3,5,b7.


The I and IV stays as a natural 7th or maj7 becuase there's a 1/2 step
btween 3,4 and 7,8.

In the diatonic scale (reference piont) there's a 1/2 step between
7, 8
Last edited by Ordinary at May 6, 2008,