#1
This site and several others finally have me understanding modes, now I'm looking for a site that explains the application of modes more in depth as well as other theory related to jazz improv and whatnot. Any suggestions?
#3
I'm just looking for general mode application...not just your average "You have this chord progression so you should play in this mode" but more of a chord to chord analytical approach.
#5
I'm not asking anyone to explain anything specifically, I'm looking for a reference to somewhere that further explains the application of modes specifically in chord to chord jazz improvisation.
#6
Quote by fattyDQ
I'm just looking for general mode application...not just your average "You have this chord progression so you should play in this mode" but more of a chord to chord analytical approach.

What you described kind of is 'general mode application,' but I suppose that's not what you want to hear.

The rub when it comes to modal music is in the simplicity of it, as well as the way that it both limits and frees your playing. With tonal music, it's easy (a very big ISH here) to just follow the chords by targeting specific notes to reap tension and sow resolution. After you get used to the process, it basically becomes second nature, and with complex chord progressions, it's easy to see where the music tenses and resolves. With modal music, on the other hand, you have very simple chord progressions, often consisting of just one, two, or three chords that don't have quite the same sense of resolution that you hear when you're playing in your basic major or minor tonalities. When you come across a tune where you're forced to play over just two chords that alternate each measure for several minutes, it quickly becomes boring to simply follow the chords like you would in a piece that was major, cut and dry.

With modal music, you have much more of an opportunity to explore the melodic possibilities of scales. The first time I listened Miles Davis' album Kind of Blue (a landmark modal jazz album), I was a bit stunned when I heard John Coltrane's solo on Flamenco Sketches. I was so used to hearing sax players playing furiously to keep up with the swift chord changes that are characteristic of bebop, that I was struck a bit dumb to hear him play such simple (and catchy!) melodies. Modal music provides a unique challenge to the improviser, as he/she must weave their own tension into the music when the harmony of the piece dictates none. Though tonal music requires strong melodies, modal music would not exist were it not for very strong melodies. In the context of a modal tune, your goal as an improviser should be to create melodies that are both challenging and familiar to the listener.

Reading through this again, I realize that I didn't really get into too many specifics, but to get that specific would require that I discuss how you come up with melody, and that's not a subject I'm ready or able to wax poetic on.
#7
Quote by titopuente
What you described kind of is 'general mode application,' but I suppose that's not what you want to hear.

The rub when it comes to modal music is in the simplicity of it, as well as the way that it both limits and frees your playing. With tonal music, it's easy (a very big ISH here) to just follow the chords by targeting specific notes to reap tension and sow resolution. After you get used to the process, it basically becomes second nature, and with complex chord progressions, it's easy to see where the music tenses and resolves. With modal music, on the other hand, you have very simple chord progressions, often consisting of just one, two, or three chords that don't have quite the same sense of resolution that you hear when you're playing in your basic major or minor tonalities. When you come across a tune where you're forced to play over just two chords that alternate each measure for several minutes, it quickly becomes boring to simply follow the chords like you would in a piece that was major, cut and dry.

With modal music, you have much more of an opportunity to explore the melodic possibilities of scales. The first time I listened Miles Davis' album Kind of Blue (a landmark modal jazz album), I was a bit stunned when I heard John Coltrane's solo on Flamenco Sketches. I was so used to hearing sax players playing furiously to keep up with the swift chord changes that are characteristic of bebop, that I was struck a bit dumb to hear him play such simple (and catchy!) melodies. Modal music provides a unique challenge to the improviser, as he/she must weave their own tension into the music when the harmony of the piece dictates none. Though tonal music requires strong melodies, modal music would not exist were it not for very strong melodies. In the context of a modal tune, your goal as an improviser should be to create melodies that are both challenging and familiar to the listener.

Reading through this again, I realize that I didn't really get into too many specifics, but to get that specific would require that I discuss how you come up with melody, and that's not a subject I'm ready or able to wax poetic on.


Wow that really helped solidify my concept of modes haha, nice post. Have you written any lessons or anything on here?
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Last edited by zipppy2006 at May 4, 2008,
#8
Quote by zipppy2006
Wow that really helped solidify my concept of modes haha, nice post. Have you written any lessons or anything on here?

There's a link to a lesson that I wrote a while back on chord voicings on my profile. Also, if you look at some of the threads that I created a few months ago entitled "My Brain Has Diarrhea," you might learn something. They got a generally good reaction. Enjoy.