#1
how do you turn a triad into a chord
do you just find the notes in the triad on the fret board and group them together or something
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#3
Triad just means that 3 different notes are played. They can be double in multiple octaves. For instance, that standard open E chord is an E major triad.

You mean three-string triad chord voicings (ways to play a chord). Your strategy is correct; if you want to play the notes in multiple octaves, simply find which notes are in the chord and play them elsewhere.
#4
Quote by bandet232
how do you turn a triad into a chord
do you just find the notes in the triad on the fret board and group them together or something


Well, a triad is basically two 3rds stacked on each other (at least tertiary triads are).
You'll always be able to find 3 consecutive strings to play them on. If you play a
note somewhere on the fretboard, then playing the next third up from that on
the next string, is (quite) roughly a diagonal angling towards the headstock.
#5
yes but how do you make that
e---0
B---1
G---0
D---2
A---3
E---3
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#6
Quote by Metallica rulz
A triad is a three note phrasing... as in 1 3 5.
C Major scale= C D E F G A B
1 3 5

CEG = C triad


Well, a chord is actually any ordered grouping of 3 notes or more played simultaneously. However, the conventional definition of a chord is a triad, or a 7th chord. A major triad involves the root of a chord, then a major third, then a minor third (perfect 5th from root). These 3 notes make a major triad of whatever type the root is. To make the triad minor, simply change the first major third to a minor third, making root, minor third, major third (again, perfect 5th from root). To turn this into a seventh chord, you can add another third on top of the 5th to make a 7th. There are five types of 7th chords, made with various combinations of diminished, major, minor triads, and major/minor/diminished 7ths. This will take too long to explain, so if you have more specific questions, you can ask them here.