#1
Did the psychedelic music of the sixties, ie country joe and the fish, jefferson airplane, grateful dead, use the minor and major pentatonic scale majorly or did they use a different kind. all the scales sound similar, i just dont think they sound like the major or minor pentatonic scales
#2
Quote by Bmg6690
Did the psychedelic music of the sixties, ie country joe and the fish, jefferson airplane, grateful dead, use the minor and major pentatonic scale majorly or did they use a different kind. all the scales sound similar, i just dont think they sound like the major or minor pentatonic scales

I'm not familiar with Country Joe and the Fish. As far as Jefferson Airplane goes, I can give you an analysis of White Rabbit. The intro lead part moves in and out of F# phrygian and F# phrygian dominant. The chords in the verse: F# major and G major imply F# phrygian dominant. The chorus is a bit different; it kind of switches back and forth between A major and G major. To me, most of the song's sound comes from the modulation in key between the verses and chorus, and the way the vocals adjust to those key changes.

I would just like to point out that these bands have extensive discographies. They wouldn't be artists if they didn't alter their approach as they progressed, so you can't just say, "I'll play this scale, and I'll sound just like Jerry Garcia." If you really want to sound like these people, you need to study their phrasing, melodic tendencies, and the little quirks in their playing that made them them.

Furthermore, having listened to a good bit of Grateful Dead, I can't say that I've ever heard much that was psychadelic in their sound. It might be because most of what I've heard of them was live shows from the late '70s. Correct me if I'm wrong and point me to where I can find the psychadelia.
#4
They did use a lot of minor and major pentatonic.

The Dead have some roots in fiddle and bluegrass types of music. There's a lot
of major and myxolidian in thier flavor.

Quote by titopuente

Furthermore, having listened to a good bit of Grateful Dead, I can't say that I've ever heard much that was psychadelic in their sound. It might be because most of what I've heard of them was live shows from the late '70s. Correct me if I'm wrong and point me to where I can find the psychadelia.


Well, at the time, the Dead and LSD pretty much went hand in hand. But I'd
pretty much agree thier music wasn't all that psychedelic in nature. Just that
people liked to go out into nature, take psychedelics, and listen to thier music.
Last edited by edg at May 5, 2008,
#5
Quote by titopuente
Furthermore, having listened to a good bit of Grateful Dead, I can't say that I've ever heard much that was psychadelic in their sound. It might be because most of what I've heard of them was live shows from the late '70s. Correct me if I'm wrong and point me to where I can find the psychadelia.


I don't know about you, but Dark Star has always sounded about as psychedelic as it could get to me...
Quote by Ed O'Brien
“It’s not genius. It’s just that if you want something good to come out of something, you have to put in a lot of effort. That involves a lot of hard work, and a lot of blood, sweat and tears sometimes.”

http://urbanscarecrow.bandcamp.com/
#6
Quote by edg
They did use a lot of minor and major pentatonic.

The Dead have some roots in fiddle and bluegrass types of music. There's a lot
of major and myxolidian in thier flavor.

Well, at the time, the Dead and LSD pretty much went hand in hand. But I'd
pretty much agree thier music wasn't all that psychedelic in nature. Just that
people liked to go out into nature, take psychedelics, and listen to thier music.

A good friend of mine who happens to be a Dead-head and a regular user of LSD actually explained the appeal of the Dead to psychonauts to me pretty well. The idea is that if you listen to their live shows, a lot of the songs have an extended jam section in the middle of their songs. After hearing the head of the songs, the tripper is free to space out during the jam, letting the music take them where it takes them; then, the band returns to the head and reels the listener back in. My own experiences have confirmed this. It's also helpful that a lot of their music is so upbeat; no tripper wants to hear someone sing about how much the world sucks.

And to Damascus, I've never actually listened to Dark Star before, but I will and I'll get back to you on that.

To BGC, I don't really hear it as being in E. The bridge does have the A-E progression, but the rest of the song doesn't really center around E.
Last edited by titopuente at May 5, 2008,