Poll: Which meter?
Poll Options
View poll results: Which meter?
12/8
4 20%
4/4 with swung 8th
16 80%
Other
0 0%
Voters: 20.
#1
I've been writing a song with a swing feel. It's finally time to write it down and I'm unsure whether I should use 4/4 with a swing rhythm or 12/8.

Argument for 4/4:
Most of the rhythm follows the swing 8th feel.

Argument for 12/8:
A lot of the lead is in triplets.

I'll probably go with swing just because alternating between quarter notes and 8th notes will drive me crazy, but what you y'all think?

Edit: Please post your reasons.
#2
whats wrong with the leads being in triplets? o.o


i'd say 12/8, because it's more work for u writing the triplets.
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#3
4/4 with swing.

Imo there is a difference in accents between those meters. Btw in 4/4 it'll be easier to read.
#4
ofcourse hearing it could change my opinion, but based on what you've said:

I would go with 4/4 swing.

most swing tunes are in 4/4 played with a swing feel.

12/8 = unnecessarily complicated.
#6
4/4 with swing, that way all you have to write is eighth notes instead of a quarter note then eighth note.
#9
Quote by bangoodcharlote
In 4/4, Q=110.
In 12/8, Q.=110


many ballads are in 4/4 as well.

is the entire melody in triplets?
#11
Quote by bangoodcharlote
A lot of the melody is in triplets. I use the "triplet within a triplet" thing as well.



ok. Well its pretty much impossible to give you the right answer without hearing any of it, or seeing some of it written down.

You might want to try writing out the 1st 8 bars one way, and see if that works. You could always post it here to get some more feedback, or you might just know once you've written some of it out.

sometimes you just have to try and see what happens. Even if you try one way, and find it to be the wrong way, it will be a good learning experience, and you will know the next time around.
#12
Quote by GuitarMunky
or you might just know once you've written some of it out.
I think that's what's going to happen.

I'm going with 4/4 for now. No further posts in this thread are necessary.

Thanks guys.
#14
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I've been writing a song with a swing feel. It's finally time to write it down and I'm unsure whether I should use 4/4 with a swing rhythm or 12/8.

Argument for 4/4:
Most of the rhythm follows the swing 8th feel.

Argument for 12/8:
A lot of the lead is in triplets.

I'll probably go with swing just because alternating between quarter notes and 8th notes will drive me crazy, but what you y'all think?

Edit: Please post your reasons.
Before I add my two cents, I'd be very interested to read how the different posters differentiate between swing 8ths and 12/8.
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#15
The feel is obviously the same, that's why I could use either, but I'm unsure which would be easier to read and write.

I also usually consider something to be in 12/8 if it uses a lot of triplets, especially by the rhyhtm guitar, or is slow (ie a slow blues).
#16
^I disagree.

While 12/8 is commonly used to notate "swing" for classical players who don't have much experience with the style, swing is much more than that. It's actually pretty rare for swing to fall perfectly into 12/8 subdivisions; the ratio changes depending on the tempo, the style, and the player.

If you want it to swing, write it in 4/4, add "swung" to the top. Save 12/8 for melodies that really sound compound (I tend to associate compound time with more of a lilt than a swing)
#17
Quote by Nick_
^I disagree.

While 12/8 is commonly used to notate "swing" for classical players who don't have much experience with the style, swing is much more than that. It's actually pretty rare for swing to fall perfectly into 12/8 subdivisions; the ratio changes depending on the tempo, the style, and the player.

If you want it to swing, write it in 4/4, add "swung" to the top. Save 12/8 for melodies that really sound compound (I tend to associate compound time with more of a lilt than a swing)



+1
#18
Quote by Nick_
While 12/8 is commonly used to notate "swing" for classical players who don't have much experience with the style, swing is much more than that. It's actually pretty rare for swing to fall perfectly into 12/8 subdivisions; the ratio changes depending on the tempo, the style, and the player.
My swing rhythm really fits with the triplet thing.
#19
And there's nothing wrong with that.

I agree with your decision to notate it in 4/4.


Get writing.
#20
Just about every jazz realbook/fakebook uses 4/4 with triplets where required - i've hardly ever seen a jazz standard leadsheet (the most popular format for notating a jazz tune) use a 12/8 time signature.

Once had to produce a lengthy jazz transcription whilst at university - got marked down for precisely notating a dotted 16-note, 32 note tied to a 16 note and a final 16 note riff, rather than illustrating it as a triplet over a half note (which would have been technically incorrect but apparently would have been the accepted format for jazz). Would have been a 100% grade otherwise! Grrr......
#21
I say 12/8, simply because it will make it a lot easier to follow the lead guitar and not much harder for the rhythm... Yeah, I know this is vague, it's just what I'd do =]